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By Ted Shelsby | October 29, 1991
The recent political and social changes in the Soviet Union have come to the small, sleepy Eastern Shore town of Cambridge in the form of an economic blessing.Western Publishing Co. picked up one of the largest contracts in its 30-year history early this year when it was asked to print 2 million copies of the New Testament for distribution in the Soviet Union.By now these copies have made their way to residents in Moscow, Minsk and St. Petersburg, who have more freedom these days to read the words of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, and more orders could come in the future.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 1996
GSE Systems, a Columbia company that makes and designs software and simulators to train workers in the nuclear power and manufacturing industries, said yesterday that it has won a contract to supply control room training simulators to the former Soviet Union.The company was awarded the $6.5 million contract by Pacific ZTC Northwest National Laboratory, a quasi-government agency connected to the U.S. Department of Energy. The contracts are part of an international effort to train workers and improve nuclear plant safety in the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 1, 2014
Vladimir Putin has been kicked out of an exclusive club, but he may not even care. Last month, meeting in The Hague, leaders from seven of the world's biggest economic powers agreed to blackball Mr. Putin's Russia, reducing the G8 to the G7. They ratified the decision to move the group's upcoming annual world economic summit to Brussels, taking away from Mr. Putin the chance to host the event in Sochi, site of his recent successful Winter Olympic...
NEWS
December 30, 1990
Howard Community College will offer a 14-day trip to the Soviet Union from June 30 through July 3.The trip, which will be led by Russian historian and HCC Associate Dean Vladimir Marinich, will feature tours of Moscow's Red Square and the Kremlin; a trip to Kiev with a cruise on the Dnieper River and a visit to the Museum of Folk Art; a journey to Leningrad during the White Nights Festival with tours of the Winter Palace, Hermitage Museum and St. Issac's Cathedral;...
NEWS
By Roman Szporluk | January 30, 1991
ALTHOUGH Mikhail Gorbachev insists that "neither the internal nor the external policy has changed" in the Soviet Union, the truth is that everything has changed.The Soviet interventions in Lithuania and Latvia have demolished any lingering hopes that Gorbachev could transform the Soviet Union into a free association of republics. In essence, the Soviet Union has ceased to exist.The great question, which will be played out over the next months and years, is what will emerge in its stead.Before the Jan. 13 invasion of Lithuania there was still hope that the republics could attain political independence peacefully and go on to freely establish economic ties that would benefit them all. This still may occur but not under the leadership of Gorbachev, who has clearly chosen to save the empire by falling back on the army, secret police and central bureaucracy.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | September 4, 1991
A MARXIST, Antonio Gramsci, put it best. "The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and and the new cannot be born," he wrote from his prison cell in the 1920s."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Political chaos and economic decline in the former Soviet Union since the end of Communist rule have produced "an almost total demographic collapse," as birth rates have plummeted and death rates risen, according to a study released yesterday.The collapse is most dramatic in Russia itself, said Carl Haub, the demographer who wrote the study. Even before the disastrous war in Chechnya, life expectancy for Russian men had fallen below the retirement age of 60, the result of the rising toll of stress-related heart attacks, alcoholism, accidents, murder and suicide, he said.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
This is a new dawn in the Soviet Union -- or whatever the country emerging from this week's failed coup will be called. Just as President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's six years of reforms altered the psychology of his fellow citizens, so have events of the past few days changed the political dynamics between the Kremlin and the republics. Mr. Gorbachev is back in his office today not only because of the personal courage and leadership of Russian President Boris Yeltsin but also because every other republic refused to join the reactionary takeover against the central government.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | December 17, 1994
Back in the Cold War, it was common for scholars and pundits to remind us that the adversary was not necessarily the Soviet Union but Russia.Expansion, hegemony and influence sought by Stalin and his successors represented continuity not only with Lenin but also with the Imperial Russia of the czars.This explained the drive to a warm-water port, the presence in the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas, the bullying in Eastern Europe, the collision with China.It was fashionable to quote Alexis de Tocqueville writing in 1835 that the two great nations were the Russians and the Americans, each ''marked out by the will of Heaven to sway the destinies of half the globe.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 24, 2014
Former Democratic National Chairman Robert S. Strauss, who passed away Wednesday at a robustly lived 95, was a happy political warrior whose talent and energies took him far afield from his chosen playground, even to Moscow where he served as the first American ambassador after the collapse of the Soviet Union. He was a rare combination of straight-talker and schmoozer who endeared himself to friend and foe alike, to the point that when he left Russia in 1993, he was given a huge vodka-flowing reception at the Russian Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
I can not agree with the recent letters to The Sun written about the unrest in Ukraine. Although the U.S. has current economic problems, our nation has always shown the resiliency to overcome them in the long run, fueled by a democratic, capitalistic and innovative society ( "Ukraine not unlike the U.S.," Feb. 27). This, unfortunately, is not characteristic of the Ukraine, formerly part of the communist Soviet Union. As for the writer who insists that Russia has every right to claim interference with its sphere of influence ( "The U.S. should speak softly on Ukraine," Feb. 27)
NEWS
February 24, 2014
I am extremely disappointed by President Obama's lack of engagement in Ukraine. It pains me that Russian President Vladimir Putin seems to be playing him for a toothless paper tiger ( "Obama plans to talk to Russia's Putin about Ukraine deal Friday - official," Feb. 21). When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Ukraine had the world's third largest nuclear arsenal, larger than the those of the UK, France and China combined. The Unites States, Russia and the UK guaranteed Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity in exchange for surrendering its nuclear arsenal.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
Comments and observations about the U.S. Olympic speed skating team should cover the gamut of possible influences as to the unexpected results of the competition ( "In Sochi, Under Armour skates into some sturm und drang," Feb. 15). It seems very strange to me that so many are quick to point to a very thin, sleek, and I am sure almost weightless, suit as being the culprit for outcomes that have not resulted in winning Olympic medals. I have competed in athletics for many years, not anywhere close to the Olympic level, but regardless of the level, I do know that for each and every sport there is a myriad of areas that influence outcomes.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
North Dakota State has built itself into a juggernaut in the Football Championship Subdivision, winning the last two national championships and going 23-0 since its last loss on Oct. 13, 2012, when Indiana State pulled off a 17-14 upset in Fargo, N.D. The Bison, who are 14-0 and the No. 1 seed in the NCAA playoffs, will meet No. 7 seed Towson (13-2) in the title game on Jan. 4 at 2 p.m. at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. Coach Rob Ambrose was quite complimentary on Monday of the team standing in the Tigers' path to the program's first national crown.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 17, 2012
Jeanne Vertefeuille and Sandra Grimes could be George Smiley's people. They were recruited on their college campuses by the Central Intelligence Agency during the height of the Cold War. Jeanne wanted travel and adventure. Sandy didn't know much about the CIA; she just needed a job. Jeanne and Sandy. That's how they refer to themselves in the book they co-authored, "Circle of Treason. " It tells the story of these two women - Jeanne worked her way up from the equivalent of the steno pool, while Sandy was immediately in the Soviet division (and over her head)
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 7, 2012
My book club, which focuses on works with a Jewish theme, is reading "The Free World" by David Bezmozgis. It was one of the better novels we've read, though it conntinued a common theme of a rootless people looking for a safe haven. In 1978, when a trickle of Jews were allowed to leave the Soviet Union, three generations of the Krasnansky family land in Italy, a way station to their new home. Each member of the family carries a particularly poignant bit of personal baggage, which weighs on their decision to seek a new life in the United States, Israel or Canada.  You'll like this if: You enjoy a well-written character study, rather loosely plotted.
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