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NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TALE OF how six Moscow bankers -- formerly little-known cogs in the Soviet system -- came to control Russia's post-communist economy involves ruthless machinations and collusions. Some of the main characters not only have bought access to the highest levels of Kremlin decision-making but make the decisions themselves.Don't expect exposes about this economic power grab any time soon.Instead, Russian media controlled by the bankers are now having a field day with the doings of First Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly B. Chubais, a leading liberal reformer in President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 25, 2005
MOSCOW - With the swift, chaotic collapse yesterday of the government of Kyrgyzstan and with President Askar Akayev's decision to flee, autocrats seem to be toppling across the states of the former Soviet Union. But the triumph of opposition demonstrators in Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and Georgia in the past 18 months may have shored up rather than eroded the positions of the remaining post-Soviet strongmen, especially in strategic Central Asia. With surprising speed, a protest yesterday by thousands of opposition supporters on the streets of the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek, turned into a rout of government forces, as demonstrators overran government offices and the state-run television network.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 20, 1991
Washington. -- Among the jokes Soviet citizens use to keep despair at bay is -- was -- this: Mikhail Gorbachev says, ''When I came to power, Soviet society was on the verge of a deep abyss. Now we have taken a bold step forward.''He was never nearly bold enough. Now he has suffered condign punishment, discarded by a system he never considered discarding.The two great questions of the Gorbachev era were answered in the asking of them: Would an entrenched, brutal and cynical ruling class liquidate itself in order to improve the lot of the masses it exists to exploit?
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The crime was make-believe and the proceedings were rushed and incomplete, but for the six Russian judicial officials sitting in a Howard County jury box yesterday, the mock trial still offered an enlightening glimpse at the future. This bit of theater -- complete with lawyerly posturing and pacing, attacks on credibility and a judge who managed to stay above the fray -- was intended to give the Russians a chance to observe the workings of an American trial by jury as they prepare to launch their own jury system.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | September 24, 1990
THE GORBACHEV era of Soviet history began in the spring of 1985. It ended the summer of 1990.Day after day the news from the Soviet Union has been that what Mikhail Gorbachev tried to do has failed and is over. He tried to reshape the country to make it more efficient and permissive but keep it within the boundaries of the Soviet empire and under the direction of the ComA.MRosenthalmunist Party.Yet the news of the end of the "reform" era has still not penetrated the consciousness of the West.
TOPIC
By Bob Caldwell | June 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- On a sweltering afternoon in the first heat wave of Russia's summer, the room at 49 Leningradsky Prospekt is an oven.The lights are off and, as the shadows of late afternoon engulf the building, the room and its occupants bake in the dark.This is, as Russians might say, "normal."Electricity and air conditioning, like government and the economy, are things you can't take for granted in post-Soviet Russia.These days, Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, winner of the 1990 Nobel Peace Prize and loser of the Cold War, works out of an office here, in a hulking, gray building with a discreet hammer-and-sickle emblem over the door, halfway between the Kremlin and the international airport.
NEWS
By Clara Germani | August 24, 1996
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - When the arsenal buried in this military port's hilly, San Francisco-like downtown exploded into a giant fireball four years ago, people for 50 blocks around ran for their lives.But Andrei Ostrovsky, a skinny, hyperactive newspaper reporter, scrambled straight to the inferno to report a story of lax military discipline in which a soldier's cigarette ignited stored torpedoes, mines and rockets, killing two.And when two more military arsenals blew up in subsequent years, Ostrovsky was first on the scene and first with the stories of what had happened: Soldiers playing with a rocket and maintenance personnel burning grass over a berm full of explosives were to blame.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | September 11, 1995
Washington -- REMEMBER Russia? Recall when dealings between Washington and Moscow regularly took center stage? Recollect the days when we worried about the Cold War?At times it seems as if the Bosnian crisis and other foreign problems have eclipsed those bad old days. Many days go by now without Russia making it onto the main news agenda.While from a news standpoint, Russia remains on the back burner, it seemed to make sense to listen to Grigory Yavlinsky, a Russian politician who, insiders say, stands a good chance of succeeding President Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin next year.
NEWS
By CLARA GERMANI | August 22, 1996
MOSCOW -- Seventy years after the Bolsheviks expropriated her family home in Sebastopol, Antonina Merkulova finds herself a property owner for the first time.Russia's wave of post-Communist privatization has finally caught up with the 85-year-old pensioner. In December she exchanged the four-room communal apartment she shared with three other families for a two-bedroom apartment of her own.It's practically palatial. She has room to hang all the paintings her late husband, a famous Soviet film animator, made of the passionate lives they led through revolution, world war and Josef Stalin's purges.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | August 26, 1991
THE WORLD rejoices about what happened in Moscow, and nobody more than Li Lu, who lies starving on a street in Washington, outside the embassy of China.Li was one of the thousands of young people at Tiananmen Square who went without food day after day, trying to shake the communist rulers into surrendering a morsel of freedom. Now, in America, he is on a hunger strike again, praying that this will make the world remember some of his comrades, lying in dark isolation in communist cells.Although his heartbeat is dangerously low, he is filled with zest.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 4, 2002
TBILISI, Georgia - He claims inspiration from God, but foes say the defrocked Orthodox priest is an apostle of violence. Dressed in flowing purple robes and wearing a silver cross studded with red stones, Basil Mkalavishvili says he is merely defending the Georgian Orthodox faith of his ancestors from "Satanists." "We are not beating anybody," he says. "There were a few times when we had to fight back." Human rights groups here say Mkalavishvili's followers have staged scores of attacks during the past three years against Jehovah's Witnesses and members of the Assembly of God, Baptists and other non-Orthodox worshippers.
TOPIC
By Bob Caldwell | June 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- On a sweltering afternoon in the first heat wave of Russia's summer, the room at 49 Leningradsky Prospekt is an oven.The lights are off and, as the shadows of late afternoon engulf the building, the room and its occupants bake in the dark.This is, as Russians might say, "normal."Electricity and air conditioning, like government and the economy, are things you can't take for granted in post-Soviet Russia.These days, Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, winner of the 1990 Nobel Peace Prize and loser of the Cold War, works out of an office here, in a hulking, gray building with a discreet hammer-and-sickle emblem over the door, halfway between the Kremlin and the international airport.
NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TALE OF how six Moscow bankers -- formerly little-known cogs in the Soviet system -- came to control Russia's post-communist economy involves ruthless machinations and collusions. Some of the main characters not only have bought access to the highest levels of Kremlin decision-making but make the decisions themselves.Don't expect exposes about this economic power grab any time soon.Instead, Russian media controlled by the bankers are now having a field day with the doings of First Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly B. Chubais, a leading liberal reformer in President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
NEWS
By Clara Germani | August 24, 1996
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - When the arsenal buried in this military port's hilly, San Francisco-like downtown exploded into a giant fireball four years ago, people for 50 blocks around ran for their lives.But Andrei Ostrovsky, a skinny, hyperactive newspaper reporter, scrambled straight to the inferno to report a story of lax military discipline in which a soldier's cigarette ignited stored torpedoes, mines and rockets, killing two.And when two more military arsenals blew up in subsequent years, Ostrovsky was first on the scene and first with the stories of what had happened: Soldiers playing with a rocket and maintenance personnel burning grass over a berm full of explosives were to blame.
NEWS
By CLARA GERMANI | August 22, 1996
MOSCOW -- Seventy years after the Bolsheviks expropriated her family home in Sebastopol, Antonina Merkulova finds herself a property owner for the first time.Russia's wave of post-Communist privatization has finally caught up with the 85-year-old pensioner. In December she exchanged the four-room communal apartment she shared with three other families for a two-bedroom apartment of her own.It's practically palatial. She has room to hang all the paintings her late husband, a famous Soviet film animator, made of the passionate lives they led through revolution, world war and Josef Stalin's purges.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
At 83, George Aloysius Meyers of Govans remains a big man with a big, wry, ironic laugh that punctuates his memories like the exclamation point at the end of the Communist Manifesto."
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 25, 1994
THERE WAS a flap in Washington recently over President Bill Clinton's statement of condolence to the people of North Korea after the death of Kim Il Sung.Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., issued a press release asking whether the president had forgotten "that Kim Il Sung was responsible for the war that caused the loss of more than 54,000 American lives." Other Republicans chimed in that we hadn't sent condolences on the death of Mao Zedong.The president's defenders went right to their libraries and came up with the letters issued by Presidents Ford and Eisenhower.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 25, 2005
MOSCOW - With the swift, chaotic collapse yesterday of the government of Kyrgyzstan and with President Askar Akayev's decision to flee, autocrats seem to be toppling across the states of the former Soviet Union. But the triumph of opposition demonstrators in Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and Georgia in the past 18 months may have shored up rather than eroded the positions of the remaining post-Soviet strongmen, especially in strategic Central Asia. With surprising speed, a protest yesterday by thousands of opposition supporters on the streets of the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek, turned into a rout of government forces, as demonstrators overran government offices and the state-run television network.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | September 11, 1995
Washington -- REMEMBER Russia? Recall when dealings between Washington and Moscow regularly took center stage? Recollect the days when we worried about the Cold War?At times it seems as if the Bosnian crisis and other foreign problems have eclipsed those bad old days. Many days go by now without Russia making it onto the main news agenda.While from a news standpoint, Russia remains on the back burner, it seemed to make sense to listen to Grigory Yavlinsky, a Russian politician who, insiders say, stands a good chance of succeeding President Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin next year.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 25, 1994
THERE WAS a flap in Washington recently over President Bill Clinton's statement of condolence to the people of North Korea after the death of Kim Il Sung.Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., issued a press release asking whether the president had forgotten "that Kim Il Sung was responsible for the war that caused the loss of more than 54,000 American lives." Other Republicans chimed in that we hadn't sent condolences on the death of Mao Zedong.The president's defenders went right to their libraries and came up with the letters issued by Presidents Ford and Eisenhower.
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