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March 4, 1991
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin demanded Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's resignation a fortnight ago. Mr. Gorbachev soon responded, saying Mr. Yeltsin and his "so-called democrats" favored the "restoration" of capitalism and the "collapse" of the Soviet state."
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 2, 2005
MOSCOW - The immediate cause of Uzbekistan's decision last week to expel the United States from an air base supporting military operations in Afghanistan was a quarrel over Uzbekistan's bloody suppression of a prison riot and protests in May. But the roots of the dispute run much deeper, diplomats and experts say, to a long-term deterioration of Russian-U.S. relations, and reflect the increasing tensions between Moscow and Washington over their influence in the nations of the former Soviet Union.
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NEWS
By Carey Goldberg and Carey Goldberg,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to resolve a major budget crisis, agreed yesterday to bail out Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's near-bankrupt central government -- at a price.Coming to Mr. Gorbachev's rescue the day after Soviet State Bank officials announced that their coffers were empty, Mr. Yeltsin said Russia would guarantee the state loans Mr. Gorbachev's government needs to keep functioning and merge the central government's costs into its own budget for the coming quarter.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - When Presidents Bush and Vladimir V. Putin meet Sunday in Moscow, they will have a lot to commiserate about. Bush and the Russian president are confronting several common challenges, such as fighting terrorism and curbing weapons proliferation. But the two leaders face more immediate - and in some ways more troubling - problems closer to home. Both have seen their popularity slip domestically. As Bush draws fire for his plans to cut future Social Security benefits, Putin has provoked street protests among pensioners with his changes to welfare.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | January 17, 1991
BUDAPEST, 1956. Prague, 1968. Vilnius, 1991. Each time Soviet tanks were sent to crush subject peoples who had become bold enough to resist Moscow's rule. Each time the brutal crackdowns were accompanied by similarly unbelievable claims.The independence movements that the Red Army extinguished in Hungary and Czechoslovakia were condemned as "counter-revolutionary," a designation that automatically put them beyond the pale of Soviet tolerance and made military force obligatory.The harsh and unmistakable message of the military takeover in Lithuania won't be misheard in those other republics that have also declared their sovereignty.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 10, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, fighting for his political survival, unveiled yesterday a program of severe measures, including dismissal of local officials who disobey Moscow's orders and a moratorium until the end of the year on all strikes and demonstrations during working hours.Though many of its details remained obscure, Mr. Gorbachev's "anti-crisis program" seemed to combine a swift introduction of market forces in the economy with authoritarian measures to preserve political stability.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Diana Jean Schemo and Richard O'Mara and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondents | August 20, 1991
LONDON -- Europe faced the disturbing prospect yesterday that the period of peace and cooperation between the Soviet Union and the West may have come to an end with the overthrow of Mikhail S. Gorbachev by hard-line Communists in Moscow.The North Atlantic Treaty Organization met in emergency session in Brussels, Belgium, and the foreign ministers of the European Community scheduled a meeting for today in the same city to consider the political and, possibly, military consequences of the crisis in the east.
NEWS
August 2, 1991
President Bush imprudently abandoned U.S. neutrality in internal Soviet struggles yesterday when he went to the Ukraine -- of all places -- and effusively praised President Mikhail S. Gorbachev while warning restive Soviet republics to avoid "the hopeless course of isolation."The Ukraine, with 52 million people, one-fourth of Soviet agriculture production and one-third of its manufactures, can hardly be isolated. Nor is it wise to tie U.S. policy so closely toTC leader, however admirable and "astounding" his achievements, who lacks popular support and probably could not win the kind of open election he has avoided so far.In the abstract Mr. Bush may have been offering wise advice, especially if one believes the American political model is adaptable to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet state, marked throughout its brief but tumultuous history by great achievement and terrible suffering, died yesterday after a long and painful decline. It was 74 years old.Conceived in utopian promise and born in the violent upheavals of the "Great October Revolution of 1917," the union heaved its last breath in the dreary darkness of late December 1991, stripped of ideology, dismembered, bankrupt and hungry -- but awe-inspiring even in its fall.The end came with the resignation of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make way for a new "Commonwealth of Independent States."
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | August 26, 1991
Communism came to power in Russia by a coup d'etat in October 1917. It might well have been preserved by another coup d'etat in August 1991, had there been among the Gang of Eight a Leon Trotsky, the master tactician of the Bolshevik coup, who understood the requirements for seizing power in a modern state.Fortunately for the Soviet people and for the world, there was not. But it was a near miss, and we should not conclude from this coup's failure that the reform process in the Soviet Union could not be threatened by another, better planned and executed coup.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 2004
MOSCOW - As hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians besieged their parliament yesterday demanding that the results of a presidential election be set aside, Russian political figures cast the struggle there as one being waged between Moscow and Washington. Supporters of the opposition candidate, Viktor A. Yushchenko, swarmed through the streets of Kiev, the capital, while Yushchenko tried but failed to force parliament to declare him the winner. The government said it was recommending talks between Yushchenko and the official winner, Prime Minister Viktor F. Yanukovych, but no clear resolution was in sight.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 20, 2000
When Alexander Toradze arrived in town last week to perform with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, he had more on his mind than playing Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3. He was also thinking about two occasions when Yuri Temirkanov came to his rescue. "I want people here to know what kind of man Yuri is," the pianist said in his dressing room after a rehearsal. "They may see him only as a great conductor." Temirkanov, a fellow Russian, is the BSO's new music director. The two men have known each other for many years and have developed a strong, mutual respect.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
For 17 years, the Rev. Casimir Pugevicius presided over a network that smuggled information on human rights violations out of his ancestral homeland of Lithuania for distribution to Western news media.In appreciation, the Lithuanian government will present to the Baltimore priest today the Order of the Grand Duke Gediminas, one of its highest honors."I benignly presided over this amateurish bit of religious espionage," said the retired 71-year-old Pugevicius, who resides at the downtown St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By John Donnelly and Dave Montgomery and John Donnelly and Dave Montgomery,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- On an eight-hour plane ride from Paris to New York last fall, a Ukrainian emigre repeatedly coughed. Unbeknown to fellow passengers, the man was sick with infectious tuberculosis.And it wasn't just any tuberculosis. His was a strain of TB that had mutated into an organism able to fight off six common anti-tuberculosis drugs.Two days after the flight, the man walked into a western Pennsylvania health clinic. Doctors diagnosed the illness. Health investigators called the airline and quickly tracked down 40 passengers who had sat near the man.They were glad they did: 13 passengers were found infected with the bacteria.
FEATURES
By James Asher and James Asher,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
"Secrecy: The American Experience," by Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Yale University Press. 262 pages. $22.50. Daniel Patrick Moynihan is the senior U.S. senator from New York State and - if the assessment of the FBI and the late J. Edgar Hoover is worth much - an egghead and skunk.His newest book, "Secrecy: The American Experience," is proof that the nation could use more such intellectual rascals. In didactic detail, Moynihan builds an impressive argument that secrecy is not the ointment to preserve democracy but the oil upon which our liberties slip.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 8, 1994
Under assault on several foreign policy fronts, the Clinton administration put three successes on display in Baltimore yesterday to make the case that it is learning to cope with post-Cold War chaos.The U.S.-led occupation of Haiti, aid to the former Soviet republics and expansion of trade and relations with Asia were touted as policies that are going well."We're slowly finding patterns and approaches that work," said James F. Dobbins, the administration's Haiti coordinator, the first of three speakers at a "foreign policy town meeting" sponsored by the State Department and the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs at the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 16, 1991
MOSCOW -- Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin squared off yesterday over the referendum on whether to preserve the Soviet Union with competing broadcasts that dramatized the central role of the power struggle of the Soviet president with his populist rival in tomorrow's vote.Mr. Gorbachev pleaded for a vote in favor of preserving the Soviet Union as a "renewed federation of equal sovereign republics," saying that dissolution of the state would be a catastrophe."At issue is the fate of our country, the fate of our homeland, our common home, how we and our children and grandchildren will live," he said.
FEATURES
By James Asher and James Asher,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
"Secrecy: The American Experience," by Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Yale University Press. 262 pages. $22.50. Daniel Patrick Moynihan is the senior U.S. senator from New York State and - if the assessment of the FBI and the late J. Edgar Hoover is worth much - an egghead and skunk.His newest book, "Secrecy: The American Experience," is proof that the nation could use more such intellectual rascals. In didactic detail, Moynihan builds an impressive argument that secrecy is not the ointment to preserve democracy but the oil upon which our liberties slip.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 24, 1993
KIEV, Ukraine -- The talk in Kiev these days, as in othe outlying capitals of the former Soviet Union, is tinged with fear that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's defeat in a power struggle with his hard-line, nationalist parliament might give free rein to Russia's ancient instinct to dominate its neighbors.Leaders of nearly all the newly independent states -- including Ukraine and Georgia, whose relations with Moscow are most strained at the moment -- have sent messages of support for Mr. Yeltsin in the faint hope that their words will somehow help.
NEWS
By Elaine Sciolino and Elaine Sciolino,New York Times News Service | February 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration intends to create a supercommittee in the State Department to shape a unified strategy toward Russia and the other former Soviet republics, but it has no intention of immediately increasing foreign aid to the area, senior administration officials say.In an effort to avoid what it considers President George Bush's haphazard approach to the problem, the administration has chosen Strobe Talbott, a journalist and author...
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