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By LEONARD LATKOVSKI | January 26, 1992
This past week, 47 nations met in Washington to coordinate relief efforts for the states of the former Soviet Union. The urgency of this task has been continually reinforced by daily reports of growing hardship in all parts of the Soviet successor states. The world is reacting to the signs of extensive personal suffering -- and to the ominous indications of potential political and social instability.Yet it is surprising that the world's leaders waited so long to respond to the crisis. Even before the failure of the hard-line coup in August, there was credible evidence that this would be a dangerous winter.
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NEWS
February 24, 2014
The swiftly unfolding of events in Ukraine over the weekend saw chanting crowds depose the country's president, political prisoners freed from jail, the emergence of an interim government led by opposition figures and warrants for the arrest of former security officials who ordered police to fire on demonstrators in Kiev. The rapid developments apparently caught both U.S. and European Union officials by surprise, coming as they did only hours after those powers had signed a deal with Russia for a more gradual transition.
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BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Russia and most of the former Soviet republics were invited yesterday to join the capitalist world's two premier financial institutions, clearing the way for a massive injection of Western aid and what Moscow's new economic "czar" called a "radical speeding up" of foreign investment.The admission of the emergent democracies widens the global scope of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.The two institutions, formed at a meeting of 44 nations in the New Hampshire village of Bretton Woods in 1944, have helped guide economic and financial order in the free world since.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 12, 2007
NARVA, Estonia -- In this quiet Estonian city on a wide river separating the small Baltic nation from its mammoth Russian neighbor, the official state language, in practical terms, is also a foreign one. One hardly seems to need Estonian in Narva, where the majority of residents are ethnic Russians and where ordering a taxi, getting medicine at the pharmacy, even instruction in school, are done in Russian. The use of Estonian is so limited here that many have a similarly limited ability to speak it. That, the Estonian government says, is the problem.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 19, 1990
MOSCOW -- On Monday, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the Fourth Congress of People's Deputies that "the country and the people are becoming increasingly convinced that it is vitally important to preserve" the Soviet Union on the basis of his proposed union treaty.Yesterday, evidence to support his thesis was hard to come by:* Latvian officials charged that three explosions in Riga early in the day were staged by communist and military hard-liners as a prelude to a military takeover to block Latvian independence.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 1993
MOSCOW -- In a renewed display of tension over the resurgence of Russian nationalism, the former Soviet republics grouped in the Commonwealth of Independent States rejected a Russian proposal to grant special status to Russians living inside their borders.The proposal was put forward by President Boris N. Yeltsin at a meeting in Turkmenistan of the leaders of the 12 countries that make up the commonwealth, which comprises all the former Soviet republics except the three Baltic countries.Some 25 million Russians live in former Soviet republics, the so-called "near abroad."
NEWS
May 27, 2000
PRESIDENT Vladimir Putin is moving on two fronts to strengthen his grip on Russia. He is using administrative centralization as a way to bring his country's far-flung regions under tighter Kremlin control. He is also forging closer links to now-independent former Soviet republics willing to cooperate with Moscow. Largely because of his five-year training as a KGB spy in East Germany, Mr. Putin is strongly European in his orientation. But because of the war in Chechnya, he has come to recognize the vulnerability of the old Soviet empire's Asian borders.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 28, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - In a speech to campaign workers before his re-election in March, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin chillingly hinted at what is clearly now a foreign policy crusade. "The collapse of the Soviet Union is a national tragedy on an enormous scale," the former KGB agent told the gathering in Moscow. "We cannot only look back and curse about this issue." Putin's remarks were more than just a lamentation. In nearly five years as president, Putin has seen the Baltic states join NATO and the European Union, and the United States establish military bases in Central Asia.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
They speak Persian dialects and Turkic tongues, their ancestors developed algebra and conquered vast empires, and they live in land once traversed by the fabled Silk Road. And most Americans know very little about them. "I would venture to guess the average American may not have noticed the name Uzbekistan until three weeks ago," says John Schoeberlein, director of Harvard's Forum for Central Asian Studies. Now, some U.S. soldiers are stationed there, and the four other countries that make up the former Soviet republics of Central Asia are growing in importance because they, too, are neighbors of Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1992
BERLIN -- Thousands of ethnic Germans from the former Soviet republics are emigrating to Germany each month.Although Germany has put up $60 million to encourage them to stay in Russia, officials here privately concede that most of the 2 million ethnic Germans probably will leave the former Soviet Union by the end of the decade, further straining Germany's overburdened economy and stripping the struggling republics of qualified workers and farmers.Germany's Constitution requires the country to pay for the repatriation of any ethnic German.
NEWS
April 24, 2007
Boris N. Yeltsin was a destroyer at a time when there was much that was in need of destruction - primarily the sclerotic and decrepit Soviet Union, where an entire tottering system was devoted to the ideology of nothing-makes-sense. He turned on his one-time comrades and, drawing upon deep and vocal public support, he stood up for Russia - and in doing so stood up as well for the other 14 Soviet republics - and thereby swept aside the U.S.S.R. His death yesterday at age 76, more than 15 years after the Soviet crackup, puts in relief one salient and dismal fact about Russia today: Mr. Yeltsin, the first democratically elected president in 1,000 years of Russian history, outlived the democracy he did more than anyone else to bring into being.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 28, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - In a speech to campaign workers before his re-election in March, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin chillingly hinted at what is clearly now a foreign policy crusade. "The collapse of the Soviet Union is a national tragedy on an enormous scale," the former KGB agent told the gathering in Moscow. "We cannot only look back and curse about this issue." Putin's remarks were more than just a lamentation. In nearly five years as president, Putin has seen the Baltic states join NATO and the European Union, and the United States establish military bases in Central Asia.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | November 15, 2003
All week, protesters have been gathering around-the-clock in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi, complaining that the Nov. 2 parliamentary elections were rigged and insisting that President Eduard Shevardnadze annul them. With their demands unmet yesterday, the crowds, which had ranged from hundreds to several thousand, grew 15,000 strong, and they marched from the Parliament building toward Shevardnadze's office, demanding his resignation. "Go away, go away," they chanted. Shevardnadze, who refused to meet them, appeared on television to warn of dire consequences.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 17, 2003
MOSCOW - Authorities in the former Soviet republic of Georgia said yesterday that they had discovered two boxes of highly radioactive material that officials said could have been used to make a "dirty bomb," as well as a container of nerve gas, in a taxicab in the capital, Tbilisi. The announcement appeared to underscore concerns about the vulnerability of the former Soviet Union's vast, crumbling nuclear infrastructure and chemical weapons arsenal to thieves and terrorists. Georgian officials said police were conducting a routine search of the cab on May 31 on the road to Tbilisi's main railway station when they found three boxes, two of which contained Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, both of which are by-products of nuclear fission.
NEWS
By David Holley and Ela Kasprzycka and David Holley and Ela Kasprzycka,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2003
MOSCOW - Voters in Lithuania approved this weekend the former Soviet republic's entry into the European Union, adding to momentum for a planned 10-state expansion of the group next year. With polls showing strong pro-European Union sentiment in the Baltic state, supporters of membership had been primarily worried about a requirement that in order for the two-day referendum to be valid, a majority of eligible voters had to cast ballots. After a low turnout Saturday that frightened some EU supporters into making greater efforts to get to the polls, that threshold was easily passed yesterday.
NEWS
By Alan Friedman and Alan Friedman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2002
TBILISI, Georgia - The Georgia-Russia soccer game isn't scheduled to start for two hours, but the streets around the stadium are a mass confusion of singing, flag-waving fans and honking cars. The fall evening is clear and warm, and anticipation has been building for months. Around the world, soccer matches like this one between national teams often take on all the attributes of open warfare. Tonight, open warfare is exactly what's on everyone's mind. Less than 100 miles away, Russian helicopters are streaking down on Chechen fighters who hide out in impassable terrain.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 28, 1991
The good news is that the evil Soviet Union is disintegrating. The bad news is that instead of three votes at the United Nations, they will now get 15.High school student SAT scores are lower than ever, but since fewer than ever can afford college, freshmen-admit scores will -- rise.Some comrades want to link the economies of the Soviet republics while other comrades ask, what economies?
NEWS
September 4, 1991
While the United States has withheld recognition of the independence of Soviet republics except Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, nearly 60 percent of callers to SUNDIAL think this country should recognize the independence of other republics. Of 199 callers, 119 registered that opinion, while 80 callers, or 40 percent, said the United States should not recognize the other republics."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 12, 2002
TEL AVIV - The smokejumper from Siberia was used to leaps of faith, parachuting into remote forests to fight fierce fires. Four years ago, jobless in the former Soviet Union, he took another plunge, leaving a tattered Siberian city named Novosibirsk and taking his wife and four children to Israel. "It was," he said, "like a miracle." He had left a country that in every sense seemed to be in a deep freeze and arrived in another warmed by a hot desert wind. He found a job as a dishwasher in a restaurant, working 80 hours, supporting his family, making sure his four kids got the best schooling, the best clothes.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
They speak Persian dialects and Turkic tongues, their ancestors developed algebra and conquered vast empires, and they live in land once traversed by the fabled Silk Road. And most Americans know very little about them. "I would venture to guess the average American may not have noticed the name Uzbekistan until three weeks ago," says John Schoeberlein, director of Harvard's Forum for Central Asian Studies. Now, some U.S. soldiers are stationed there, and the four other countries that make up the former Soviet republics of Central Asia are growing in importance because they, too, are neighbors of Afghanistan.
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