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By IRA L. STRAUS | July 14, 1991
New York -- KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov, in a closed-door speech to the U.S.S.R. Supreme Soviet June 18, accused Western intelligence services planning for ''pacification and even occupation'' of the Soviet Union, on the ''pretext'' of keeping Soviet nuclear forces under control. The West was imposing demands of drastic economic changes; perestroika was being done as a favor to the West, in the ''illusion'' that the West would give tens of billions of dollars to make it work. A ''catastrophe'' was brewing, like the Nazi invasion.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1995
MYASNOI BOR, Russia -- In a country where World War II has been kept powerfully alive by the myths and legends of official propaganda, thousands of ordinary young Russians, shovels in hand, are searching for what in every sense are the true remains of the war.The young people have flocked to the woods and swamps of hundreds of villages like Myasnoi Bor, joining a voluntary campaign to find the unburied remains of the millions of Soviet soldiers who still...
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev returned to Moscow early today after the disintegration of the 3-day-old junta that tried to overthrow him. He promptly had five members of the junta arrested, according to the independent Interfax news agency.Mr. Gorbachev reassumed the full powers of his post late yesterday and said in a televised statement that he was "in full control of the situation."Mr. Gorbachev, in his first public comments on the collapsed takeover, said on Soviet television that Soviet society would have been heading for disaster if the hard-line State Committee for the State of Emergency had succeeded in its aims.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | June 13, 1993
LENIN'S TOMB: THE LAST DAYS OF THE SOVIET EMPIRE.David Remnick.Random House.576 pages. $24.50. During the botched-up 1991 coup attempt against Mikhail S. Gorbachev, men from the Soviet military prosecutor's office were digging up the bones of Stalin's victims near Moscow. Should they go on or stop?The prosecutors had interviewed a local man who described how, in April 1940, his secret police unit had shot Polish officers in the woods -- 250 a night, for a month.Like many another cog in Stalin's death machine, the aging secret police veteran had chosen to build his retirement home in those killing fields.
NEWS
August 23, 1991
More than 67 percent of callers to SUNDIAL say the United States should send food to the Soviet people, now that the coup has collapsed. Of 288 callers, 195 supported that position, and ,, 93 (32 percent) said food should not be sent.From the same total of callers, 159, or 55 percent, said Congress should grant most-favored-nation trade status to the Soviet Union, while 129 callers, 44 percent, disagreed."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
For Western nations, which could scarcely believe their good luck in Mikhail Gorbachev, the military ouster of the reformist Soviet leader is a nightmare come to life.Politicians, diplomats and strategic planners always knew this could happen: the rumbling tanks, the hardline junta, the quick stifling of free discourse. But they dared to hope.Now, with hope crushed for the moment, the United States and its allies must condemn this step back into darkness and isolate its perpetrators -- without encouraging civil war.The Soviet regime should be given to understand that the world will insist that it live up to its treaty obligations and fulfill its international commitments.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
The sons of Lenin and Stalin have once again demonstrated their true nature. After repeatedly denying rumors of a coup, the KGB, the army and police rose against a lawful government. In staging the Putsch, they circumvented the newly prescribed constitutional mechanism for removing a president and the Communist Party's own rules for ousting a leader. They wanted to take no chances. So much for communism with a human face!The history of Russian empire, whether ruled by czars or the Bolshevik usurpers who overthrew the legitimate government in 1917, is a series of failed reforms.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- Casting himself as just an old businessman, President Bush departed from two days of high-level political talks to tell aspiring Soviet wheeler-dealers how to set their country right.Think American, the president said during a new phenomenon here -- the breakfast meeting. Take risks, he said. Remember that can-do attitude.The wheeler-dealers ate it up."This is just what we need," said Alexander Vladislavlev, a Soviet people's deputy and executive vice president of the League of the Scientific and Industrial Association of the U.S.S.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Fearing the effects on Soviet people of food shortages and a severe winter, President Bush said yesterday that he may allow the Soviet Union to buy food on credit from the United States by waiving trade restrictions that prohibit such transactions.The Soviet parliament has not yet enacted the emigration guarantees that Mr. Bush has been holding out for before he lifts the controls.But the president said that he was reconsidering and might change his policy because it was harming U.S. farm communities as well as denying critical food aid to the Soviets.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | December 17, 1990
PRESIDENT BUSH now has taken directly on himself the responsibility for the lives and futures of all those millions of Soviet citizens who want to leave their country. The duty now becomes his not to feed them but to free them, not to save their government but to allow them to escape from it.Whether Bush acknowledges it or not, that is the moral and political consequence of his decision to send $1 billion worth of food on credit to the Soviet Union without condition -- and to channel all of it directly through the faltering government of Mikhail Gorbachev.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | January 25, 1992
Washington. -- I have never opposed a foreign-aid bill in my life, always believing that a rich America helping the hungry and hopeless of our troubled world would make for peace, which is infinitely cheaper than war.So why am I so uneasy, so loath to support the plea by President Bush for the Congress to allocate another $645 million in aid to Russia and the other newly independent states of the former Soviet Union? Why am I troubled by the fact that this would bring to some $5 billion the U.S. aid given or pledged to the former ''evil empire'' since it fell apart?
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
Doing business in what was the Soviet Union requires, among other things, learning how to say "little bit" when offered a glass of vodka, knowing that not everyone is Russian, and figuring out how to structure a payment plan that will put real money in the bank.A panel of Baltimore businessmen who addressed a luncheon seminar in Baltimore yesterday agreed that the vast territory does offer opportunity for the patient and knowledgeable.The country is wrestling with enormous political and economic changes that can make working there difficult, noted Alexander V. Bobilev, a Russian expatriate who operates a consulting business in Columbia.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 19, 1991
MOSCOW -- The line for sugar stretched along the sidewalk, but the sidewalk was too cramped and the line too slow, so it soon curled into a dark low passageway leading to a rear courtyard.Faces, motionless, peered out of the gloom. Five o'clock brings nightfall to Moscow. For three pounds of sugar, a month's ration, several dozen people had come to wait 45 minutes in the gathering cold.Ella Murashkavskaya tried to decide if she had time for sugar. "Our people seem to be doomed to waiting," she said.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
NEWS
By Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | September 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The majority of people in Russia and the Ukraine "are not prepared for capitalism," have only an "embryonic" appreciation of pluralism and attach little importance to personal and political freedoms.These and other findings of a major poll by the Times Mirror Co. starkly demonstrate the difficulty confronting reformers trying to establish a new economic and political system in the former Soviet Union.The belief that people who make a profit are probably doing something illegal and a preference for state ownership of most businesses collide head-on with a stated wish for a "market economy."
NEWS
September 9, 1991
Congress returns from its summer recess this week to a world turned upside down and the legislative agenda scrambled in the process. Democratic plans to put the spotlight on domestic issues will have to make way for the overriding question of how much aid the United States should provide the Soviet Union -- and in what form. In this arena, President Bush is in his element while his congressional opposition is distracted and divided.Yet even the demise of Soviet Communism will not deflect Senate confirmation hearings on Judge Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court, Robert M. Gates for the Central Intelligence Agency and William Taylor for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | August 26, 1991
THE WORLD rejoices about what happened in Moscow, and nobody more than Li Lu, who lies starving on a street in Washington, outside the embassy of China.Li was one of the thousands of young people at Tiananmen Square who went without food day after day, trying to shake the communist rulers into surrendering a morsel of freedom. Now, in America, he is on a hunger strike again, praying that this will make the world remember some of his comrades, lying in dark isolation in communist cells.Although his heartbeat is dangerously low, he is filled with zest.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | September 4, 1991
A MARXIST, Antonio Gramsci, put it best. "The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and and the new cannot be born," he wrote from his prison cell in the 1920s."
NEWS
September 1, 1991
Vladimir P. Kuzmishchev, 42, born in Tula in central Russia, has worked on Moscow newspapers for two decades and now is editor of economic news for Trud. He was in Moscow when the coup began.A colleague called me early in the morning [of Monday, Aug. 19], at my apartment near the Bauman Metro stop and said, "Turn on your TV! They ousted [Soviet President Mikhail S.] Gorbachev." I was angry and said, "That's a stupid joke. What are you waking me up for?" But I turned it on anyway, and I heard the announcer read the statement of the putschists.
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