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NEWS
December 12, 1991
If control of the Soviet nuclear arsenal is to be sorted out in a way that avoids catastrophe, the Soviet military will have to maintain its traditional discipline and acceptance of civilian authority. So far, the signs are encouraging, despite the apocalyptic warnings of Robert M. Gates, the new director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Even after a right-wing political coup attempt in August, a free fall in the economy, **TC deterioration in the morale and living conditions of the armed forces and the disintegration of the old regime, the Soviet army remains an island of relative stability.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 19, 2002
Alone among this year's nuclear-disaster pictures, K-19: The Widowmaker has the virtue of believability. Based on the real-life near-meltdown, in July 1961, of the first Russian submarine to carry ballistic missiles, the movie follows the ship's scheduled sea trials - and the unscheduled calamity that compelled its men to weld a leak and jerry-rig a cooling system in one of the reactor chambers. The officers in this brave new world of atomic nightmare make decisions in the dark; the sailors make repairs amid savage radioactivity.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When the Soviet Union throws open its borders to would-be emigres this January, thousands of scientists who design and build nuclear weapons will face a decision that has government officials biting their nails from here to Moscow.It is the nightmare prospect of Soviet "nuclear mercenaries" ending up anywhere from Iran to North Korea to Libya."After January, all the doors are open, and it is like the Wild West," said one Soviet official tracking the issue. "Some of these people, they have no scruples at all. They won't give a damn if it is Saddam Hussein or anyone else [who hires them]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2002
An international team of experts has flown to the former Soviet republic of Georgia to try to recover two highly radioactive objects that were found near a mountainous region controlled by Muslim rebels, officials said yesterday. The objects, cylinders not much larger than a can of string beans, caught the attention of three woodsmen because nearby snow was melting. The men lugged the surprisingly heavy objects to their campsite for warmth and soon became dizzy and nauseated. A week later, they had radiation burns.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2002
An international team of experts has flown to the former Soviet republic of Georgia to try to recover two highly radioactive objects that were found near a mountainous region controlled by Muslim rebels, officials said yesterday. The objects, cylinders not much larger than a can of string beans, caught the attention of three woodsmen because nearby snow was melting. The men lugged the surprisingly heavy objects to their campsite for warmth and soon became dizzy and nauseated. A week later, they had radiation burns.
NEWS
By The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C | September 5, 1991
THE HARASSED men trying to harness the hurricane of change in Moscow have gone to some pains to reassure a worried global village about who's minding Soviet nuclear buttons. But they are in no position to seize the opportunity that the second Russian revolution provides to sharply reduce the entire planet's risk of nuclear war for generations to come.Only leadership from President Bush can do that, and he needs to get busy. Soft words aren't enough.A top science adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev has urged "the international community" to help safeguard Soviet nuclear capability against the chance of political chaos.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun The New York Times contributed to this article | December 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Yesterday's move by three Soviet republics to replace central authority with a commonwealth of their own appeared to head off the Bush administration's worst nightmare.For the administration, which has clung to the idea of a central power centered in the Kremlin, the main fear has been a Yugoslavia-like conflict between republics with the potential for nuclear war.Secretary of State James A. Baker III reaffirmed those anxieties yesterday before Russia, Ukraine and Byelarus declared their commonwealth.
NEWS
August 23, 1992
Even before the collapse of communism was official, the United States and the former Soviet Union had reached agreement on destroying thousands of nuclear weapons in the superpowers' arsenals. Now that the Russians are beginning to deliver on their end of the bargain, however, a new question has arisen: what to do with tons of bomb-grade uranium and #F plutonium products extracted from former Soviet nuclear warheads?No one wants to see these materials fall into the wrong hands. The U.S. could buy and dilute weapons-grade uranium from the former Soviet Union to run in its own nuclear power plants.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
"Brain drain," much discussed during the 1960s when the Third World's best and brightest scientists were being lured away to the United States, carries sinister overtones when applied to nuclear technologists from the former Soviet Union. That's why the Americans are not the only ones trying to prevent it. Germany's Hans-Dietrich Genscher recently signed an accord with his Japanese counterpart, Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe, to support an international center that Americans have pushed to help the bomb specialists keep working while they convert to more peaceful pursuits.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | January 3, 1992
Washington. - Over 20 years I've enjoyed debating my distinguished colleague James J. Kilpatrick on the issue of education in America, and the need for massive federal financing of public schools.He lashes out that federal money means federal control, and declares that ''education is a state and local responsibility.''I riposte that education is as much a part of America's defense as the military, and then I deliver my killing blow: ''If someone walked into this room and said we should abolish the Pentagon and its central command and let state and local militia defend America, you'd slap that sucker in a straitjacket before either of us could cry, 'Doctor!
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1993
Detailing new evidence of Cold-War dangers, a report said yesterday that Moscow's nuclear-powered submarines had collided with foreign subs at least eight times over the decades and, separately, suffered at least four partial meltdowns of nuclear reactors.The report also said that one reactor on a Soviet sub exploded in 1985 while being serviced at a shipyard, killing 10 people and releasing clouds of radioactive material that irradiated workers and caused at least one case of severe radiation sickness.
NEWS
August 23, 1992
Even before the collapse of communism was official, the United States and the former Soviet Union had reached agreement on destroying thousands of nuclear weapons in the superpowers' arsenals. Now that the Russians are beginning to deliver on their end of the bargain, however, a new question has arisen: what to do with tons of bomb-grade uranium and #F plutonium products extracted from former Soviet nuclear warheads?No one wants to see these materials fall into the wrong hands. The U.S. could buy and dilute weapons-grade uranium from the former Soviet Union to run in its own nuclear power plants.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
Chernobyl introduced the world to the lax safety procedures in nuclear plants of the now-defunct Soviet Union, but the Barents Sea was where the system's roughest edges were hidden. That is the import of the revelations by a Russian nuclear engineer, Andrei Zolotkov, who says he participated in dumping radioactive reactor wastes off Novaya Zemlya during the 1970s.Later, as a member of the old Soviet parliament, Mr. Zolotkov must have had pangs of conscience as he began gathering the evidence for the reports that he recently released to Western environmental groups.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
"Brain drain," much discussed during the 1960s when the Third World's best and brightest scientists were being lured away to the United States, carries sinister overtones when applied to nuclear technologists from the former Soviet Union. That's why the Americans are not the only ones trying to prevent it. Germany's Hans-Dietrich Genscher recently signed an accord with his Japanese counterpart, Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe, to support an international center that Americans have pushed to help the bomb specialists keep working while they convert to more peaceful pursuits.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 30, 1992
One easily understands the fear that ex-Soviet nuclear expertise is going to find new sponsorship abroad, and that Soviet nuclear weapons will appear on the black market. However, nuclear proliferation is a problem with no solution. It's too late now to stop it.By licit means or illicit, there are going to be more nations with nuclear weapons. Those of us who already live in well-armed states will have to make the best of it.Obviously all that can be done should be done to destroy or secure Soviet weapons and provide harmless employment to the scientists and engineers of the new Commonwealth of Independent States.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | January 3, 1992
Washington. - Over 20 years I've enjoyed debating my distinguished colleague James J. Kilpatrick on the issue of education in America, and the need for massive federal financing of public schools.He lashes out that federal money means federal control, and declares that ''education is a state and local responsibility.''I riposte that education is as much a part of America's defense as the military, and then I deliver my killing blow: ''If someone walked into this room and said we should abolish the Pentagon and its central command and let state and local militia defend America, you'd slap that sucker in a straitjacket before either of us could cry, 'Doctor!
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is taking increasing control over the Soviet Union's strategic military forces, including "de facto" power to veto the use of nuclear weapons, U.S. officials and independent analysts said yesterday.Mr. Yeltsin's growing influence, reflected in new high-level Soviet appointments and the weakening of Soviet central authority, suggests that the country's tight control over an estimated 27,000 nuclear warheads may actually be drawn even tighter, they said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States, hoping to prevent the new Soviet revolution from degenerating into chaos, urged central authorities and republics yesterday to work out new power-sharing schemes in an "orderly, democratic" way free of threats or violence.Secretary of State James A. Baker III also said he hoped that the Soviet nuclear arsenal would be kept under a central command authority, an apparent response to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's bid for his republic to share control of the nuclear button.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | December 30, 1991
Washington. -- In a nightmare scenario from the debris of the Soviet Union, jobless scientists from the old empire are drawn by undreamed-of pay to clandestine military laboratories in rogue nations.The Cold War is thus succeeded by an appalling menace -- a proliferation of nuclear weapons and missiles to deliver them.High-tech fiction? Not at all. Science and engineering, no less than other professions, possess a mercenary streak that's easily inflamed by hard times and professional opportunities.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,New York Times News Service | December 22, 1991
ALMA-ATA, Kazakhstan -- Eleven former republics of the Soviet Union formally constituted themselves yesterday as the Commonwealth of Independent States, dedicated to reversing their slide toward economic and political chaos.Putting aside seven decades of central dictatorship, the republic leaders meeting in the Kazakh capital, near the Chinese border, negotiated and signed a broad commonwealth agreement that guarantees their separate sovereignties.But the agreement leaves unsettled such important issues as how to create an acceptable system of command to administer military policy and nuclear weapons control.
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