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By Los Angeles Times | July 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The commander in chief of the Soviet navy announced yesterday that the number of vessels in his country's fleet would be cut by between 20 percent and 25 percent within the next decade, the official news agency Tass reported.Adm. Vladimir N. Chernavin said that the Soviet fleet, one of the world's largest, would maintain defensive sufficiency despite the cuts."Combat capabilities of the navy will be maintained thanks to the qualitative renewal of all branches of the service," he told Tass.
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NEWS
By Newsday | May 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- A specially equipped U.S. submarine recovered two nuclear bombs in 1976 from the underwater wreckage of a Soviet strategic bomber that had crashed in the North Pacific that year, the Russian newspaper Izvestia reports.The submarine Grayback reached the wreckage and recovered the bombs after Japanese air defense officials, who had tracked the bomber, alerted the U.S. naval command and relayed the precise position of the wreckage, the newspaper said reported yesterday.The Soviet Navy took no action to recover the bombs because it was never informed of the crash by the country's central military command, Izvestia said, citing as its source a senior Soviet naval official who later investigated the incident.
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NEWS
By Newsday | May 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- A specially equipped U.S. submarine recovered two nuclear bombs in 1976 from the underwater wreckage of a Soviet strategic bomber that had crashed in the North Pacific that year, the Russian newspaper Izvestia reports.The submarine Grayback reached the wreckage and recovered the bombs after Japanese air defense officials, who had tracked the bomber, alerted the U.S. naval command and relayed the precise position of the wreckage, the newspaper said reported yesterday.The Soviet Navy took no action to recover the bombs because it was never informed of the crash by the country's central military command, Izvestia said, citing as its source a senior Soviet naval official who later investigated the incident.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The commander in chief of the Soviet navy announced yesterday that the number of vessels in his country's fleet would be cut by between 20 percent and 25 percent within the next decade, the official news agency Tass reported.Adm. Vladimir N. Chernavin said that the Soviet fleet, one of the world's largest, would maintain defensive sufficiency despite the cuts."Combat capabilities of the navy will be maintained thanks to the qualitative renewal of all branches of the service," he told Tass.
FEATURES
By Julian S. Jones | July 14, 1991
When a University of Maryland delegation reached Vladivostok airport recently, it was met by a band of Gypsies.The delegation's Aeroflot flight had arrived early and the Soviet hosts had not yet turned up. In their place were perhaps 75 Gypsies who had been waiting on the airport's second-floor mezzanine, apparently for several days. They had strung makeshift tents from old sheets and blankets, and some sat on the floor in front of these temporary homes drinking tea and smoking. The Soviet hosts hustled their American colleagues out of the airport in a hurry, explaining later in the taxis that they feared something might be stolen.
NEWS
August 19, 1992
The Black Sea fleet was the part of the Soviet navy that shadowed the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Eastern Mediterranean. Obsolete as it is, the fleet is capable of doing a powerful amount of harm, some of it nuclear. But with the lesson of the Yugoslav army in view, the Black Sea fleet is a menace particularly to the two countries that claim it, Russia and Ukraine. One of the things the 300-vessel armada has the capability to do is blow itself out of the water.Russia and Ukraine have threatened to destroy the Commonwealth of Independent States in their rival claims on the fleet, tied to their rival claims on the Crimean peninsula.
NEWS
June 14, 1991
Boris N. Yeltsin's landslide victory is a watershed event in the dismantling of the Soviet Communist system. Seventy-three years after Bolsheviks deposed Russia's standing government, voters have returned the Russian republic and Moscow and Leningrad city governments to non-Communist hands. They also want St. Petersburg, the pre-revolutionary name of Leningrad, restored.These expressions of popular will change the very dynamics of Soviet politics at a time when future power-sharing between the Kremlin and the republics is still to be defined.
NEWS
August 19, 2000
THE RUSSIAN NAVY will struggle mightily to recover from the loss of the nuclear submarine Kursk, which sank in Arctic waters with 118 crew members aboard. The catastrophe was the worst in the history of that country's nuclear fleet. Even after the pain heals, the memory of the disaster may make Kremlin policy-makers hesitant to beef up its navy. In the post-Cold War rejuggling, high-maintenance navy has become increasingly expendable. The Kremlin has slashed its share of the military budget to 12 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | March 4, 2001
"Big Red: Three Months On Board a Trident Nuclear Submarine," by Douglas C. Waller. HarperCollins. 336 pages. $27.50. By any measure, it stands among the greatest marvels of human invention in history -- a ship as long as a 56-story building is high, as wide as a three-lane highway and capable of traveling underwater for months at a time. It makes its own drinking water, oxygen, heat and electricity for a crew of 160 men. Fully provisioned, it is completely self-sufficient -- whether under the polar ice cap or in the middle of the open sea. Oh, yes, and there's this: It carries 1,560 tons of nuclear missiles in its belly that could quite readily incinerate at least 14.5 million people, injure at least three times that many more and flatten a piece of the globe many thousands of square miles wide.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- In a new sign of the rapid fragmentation of the Soviet army, acting Commander in Chief Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov disclosed yesterday that only five of the 11 members of the new Commonwealth of Independent States want to join in a unified armed forces.The remaining six, he said, want their own conventional armies, VTC although all are agreed that nuclear forces should remain under unified command.Mr. Shaposhnikov appealed for a two-year transition period to allow the 3.7-million-member Soviet army, the world's largest, to regroup "without losses, tears and blood."
FEATURES
By Julian S. Jones | July 14, 1991
When a University of Maryland delegation reached Vladivostok airport recently, it was met by a band of Gypsies.The delegation's Aeroflot flight had arrived early and the Soviet hosts had not yet turned up. In their place were perhaps 75 Gypsies who had been waiting on the airport's second-floor mezzanine, apparently for several days. They had strung makeshift tents from old sheets and blankets, and some sat on the floor in front of these temporary homes drinking tea and smoking. The Soviet hosts hustled their American colleagues out of the airport in a hurry, explaining later in the taxis that they feared something might be stolen.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 12, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian-Ukrainian relations rose to the boiling point yesterday after 120 Ukrainian navy commandos seized a maintenance base of the disputed Black Sea Fleet near Odessa in a late-night raid that reportedly injured some Russian sailors and their family members.The Ukrainian Defense Ministry acknowledged that commandos raided the base Sunday night to arrest three Russian officers for their role in an incident Saturday.But it denied that anyone was hurt and said no damage was done.
NEWS
December 7, 2002
THE MODERN jet-powered passenger plane, a child of the 1950s, has made the ideal of speed on land or at sea largely beside the point. That's why American trains are slower than they were a generation ago, and why the record for a trans-Atlantic crossing by a passenger liner, once a highly contested distinction, has stood unchallenged now for 50 years. It was in 1952 - a golden half-century ago - that the SS United States pulled away from her pier on the west side of Manhattan, set her course at the Ambrose Lightship standing guard outside New York Harbor, and, three days, 10 hours and 40 minutes later, carried her 1,660 passengers past Bishop's Rock in the English Channel.
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