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NEWS
August 27, 1991
Somewhere in the vast land area that is or was the Soviet Union and on its ships at sea, there are still 4 million military personnel, 27,000 nuclear warheads and thousands of tanks, aircraft, artillery and other instruments of war or population suppression. How this vast force will be shaken up, downsized and distributed as the nation unravels is a security question for the whole world.Warning bells were ringing following reports that putschists seized Mikhail S. Gorbachev's equivalent of a nuclear black box before their attempted coup d'etat collapsed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | July 8, 2001
When that celebrated spymaster Moses dispatched 12 agents to the Promised Land on a 40-day reconnaissance mission, the operation ended in debacle. Some spies came back talking of milk and honey; others reported terrifying giants. The bewildered Israelites rioted, provoking the Lord to consume some with fire and sentence others to 40 years in the wilderness. But did Moses swear off espionage? Oh, no. He sent more spies out, the Book of Numbers tells us. This time, his agents were taken prisoner.
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NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet military, battered by internal divisions fed by ethnic tensions, desertions and low morale, may be unable to consolidate power for the new Soviet regime consolidate if widespread violent protest breaks out, U.S. military and independent analysts said yesterday.It cannot be certain that soldiers dispatched to respond to civil unrest across the country will follow orders to fire on civilians, the analysts said."The more resistance there is, the more strain it'll put upon the military.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - A Florida jury took only one vote yesterday to unanimously convict a retired civilian employee of the Army, who also had been a colonel in the Army Reserves, of spying for the Soviet Union and then Russia over a period of at least 25 years. George Trofimoff, 74, was found guilty of providing highly classified documents to Moscow from a NATO interrogation center where he worked in Nuremberg, Germany, from 1969 to 1994. Trofimoff, a naturalized American whose parents were Russian emigres, could be sentenced to life in prison.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | September 6, 1991
It's usually true that those tough-to-get interviews come through only when the elusive subject has something to sell. Warren Beatty becomes available when "Dick Tracy" is about to be released. Madonna can be had when "Truth or Dare" needs to sell tickets.And so last night Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin brought their much anticipated Russian road show to a two-hour ABC late night news special.They were selling a lot of things -- their own uneasy alliance, the stability of their country, the genuine nature of the reforms that have taken hold.
NEWS
By RON MARTZ | December 27, 1991
Washington--When the Soviet Union officially goes poof -- or bang -- at midnight Dec. 31, the behemoth that is the Soviet military machine is unlikely to go up in smoke with it.Like a creaking, clanking machine that has run on its own power for years, the Soviet military will take months, if not years, to break apart, according to military analysts who have closely monitored the dissolution of the superpower.''The Soviet military will exist long after it's dead because even if the central units dissolve, the individuals in the republic armies will be from the Soviet military,'' said David Isby, a Washington-based expert on Soviet military affairs.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1991
BERLIN -- Under pressure to turn former East German leader Erich Honecker over to stand trial, the Soviet military has spirited him away to Moscow, officials said yesterday.Although the Soviet Embassy in Berlin refused to make any official comment, officials said privately that Mr. Honecker's medical condition had "worsened acutely" and that he required surgery. He is said to be suffering from heart and kidney problems."We took him to Moscow Wednesday for humanitarian reasons," one official said, saying Mr. Honecker could receive "more appropriate care" there than if he were sent to a German hospital.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With the leadership of the Soviet military in doubt, American planning is increasingly focused on preventing the spread of Soviet nuclear weapons or expertise to the Middle East, North Korea or other developing nations that want atomic weapons, according to administration officials."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said yesterday that the Soviet Union will pull thousands of troops out of Cuba within a few months in an effort to "modernize" relations between the bankrupt ex-Communist superpower and its one-time bridgehead off the Florida coast.Mr. Gorbachev's statement at a news conference with Secretary of State James A. Baker III was described as "sensational" by Soviet television last night, and the troops' withdrawal will remove what for Americans has been a potent symbol of the Soviet military threat for three decades.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to the Sun | November 23, 1991
BERLIN -- The KGB, the once dreaded Soviet secret police and espionage agency, may be disintegrating in Moscow, but it is still very much alive in Germany.That is illustrated by a recent incident, German counterespionage sources say.Shortly after the Soviet consul general in Hamburg failed to persuade a Soviet soldier to give up his application for political asylum in Germany and return home, they say, the KGB stepped in.While the man was window shopping in Heide, in northern Germany, a rental car drove up, and two men stepped out and shoved the protesting man into the back seat.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2000
MEXICO CITY - Through the working-class neighborhood of Pueblo Quieto, a thin, tall man stops to talk with shop owners and housewives in doorways. "Hi. I'm Lopez y Rivas," he says, handing a flier to an old woman in an apron. "I'm running for delegation chief. I hope you'll favor us with your vote." Gilberto Lopez y Rivas is a congressman from the center-left Party of the Democratic Revolution. He is running for chief of Mexico City's most expansive "delegation," or borough, Tlalpan, home to about 700,000 people.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 1998
MOSCOW -- A new and terrifying picture is emerging of the deadliest known incident in the history of biological weapons.It was an accidental outbreak of anthrax in the city of Sverdlovsk in 1979, and it now appears that the disease was both more widespread and considerably more virulent than Russian officials have ever acknowledged.The picture that emerges of the Sverdlovsk incident is one of helpless doctors and hundreds -- or perhaps even thousands -- of people dying quickly and in great pain.
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service | September 25, 1992
MOSCOW -- Stalin advised Communist leaders in China and Korea to hold back 20 percent of U.S. pilots captured during the Korean War and use them as bargaining chips with the United States, according to documents drawn from Soviet archives officially delivered to the U.S. government yesterday.Accounts of these conversations were included in a thick file handed over to former U.S. Ambassador Malcolm Toon, here in Moscow on his third trip as co-chairman of a joint commission investigating the fate of POW's and other Americans held in the Soviet Union after World War II.The file also contains documents from the interrogation, conducted in the presence of Soviet security forces, of 54 U.S. pilots held in Korea and China, said Gen. Dmitri Volkogonov, a military historian who is Mr. Toon's counterpart on the commission.
NEWS
By MARK FINEMAN | April 19, 1992
The man so big in stature and so brutal in technique that he was nicknamed "The Ox" was clearly in a good mood that day, beaming broadly as he predicted confidently that history would remember him as the savior of his nation.Seated at the big wooden conference table in an office ringed by security men, President Najibullah banged the table time and again to make his point. He belly-laughed, told stories of swimming against virtual tidal waves in the Caspian Sea and finally lowered his voice, narrowed his eyes and jabbed the air with a beefy finger as he summed up his five years at the helm of a nation at war with itself.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- It is a dismal end to glory.On a gray foggy day, four Soviet naval officers sit in a tiny office at a Tallinn minesweeping base, trying to sort out who they are and where they belong.Out the window, a half-dozen navy ships can be seen scattered near the shore. Inside, a captain and three lieutenant commanders sit under the gaze of V. I. Lenin, whose portrait still hangs on the wall.The mighty Soviet military, once pampered with all the tanks and technology it could desire, now considers itself lucky to have bread.
NEWS
By Carey Goldberg and Carey Goldberg,Los Angeles Times Knight-Ridder Newspapers contributed to this article | January 18, 1992
MOSCOW -- Standing before khaki-clad multitudes of his fellow officers yesterday, Lt. Col. Melis Bekbasynov abandoned his army-bred stoicism and gave voice to his pain."
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service | September 25, 1992
MOSCOW -- Stalin advised Communist leaders in China and Korea to hold back 20 percent of U.S. pilots captured during the Korean War and use them as bargaining chips with the United States, according to documents drawn from Soviet archives officially delivered to the U.S. government yesterday.Accounts of these conversations were included in a thick file handed over to former U.S. Ambassador Malcolm Toon, here in Moscow on his third trip as co-chairman of a joint commission investigating the fate of POW's and other Americans held in the Soviet Union after World War II.The file also contains documents from the interrogation, conducted in the presence of Soviet security forces, of 54 U.S. pilots held in Korea and China, said Gen. Dmitri Volkogonov, a military historian who is Mr. Toon's counterpart on the commission.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 25, 1991
Mikhail Gorbachev may be the most misunderstood European authoritarian since General Franco.In the late 1930s, Franco was widely thought to be an Iberian Hitler, a dynamic force for a radical New Order. In fact Franco just wanted to shove modernity back north of the Pyrenees.Mr. Gorbachev, like Franco, is partly responsible for being misunderstood. Mr. Gorbachev's rhetoric has often been, as Franco's was, bolder than his aims. But Mr. Gorbachev has made clear that his aim is preservation of the ''socialist choice'' -- his phrase -- the Soviet Union made in 1917.
NEWS
By RON MARTZ | December 27, 1991
Washington--When the Soviet Union officially goes poof -- or bang -- at midnight Dec. 31, the behemoth that is the Soviet military machine is unlikely to go up in smoke with it.Like a creaking, clanking machine that has run on its own power for years, the Soviet military will take months, if not years, to break apart, according to military analysts who have closely monitored the dissolution of the superpower.''The Soviet military will exist long after it's dead because even if the central units dissolve, the individuals in the republic armies will be from the Soviet military,'' said David Isby, a Washington-based expert on Soviet military affairs.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With the leadership of the Soviet military in doubt, American planning is increasingly focused on preventing the spread of Soviet nuclear weapons or expertise to the Middle East, North Korea or other developing nations that want atomic weapons, according to administration officials."
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