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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1991
LONDON -- British officials said yesterday that a response to Soviet interest in having President Mikhail S. Gorbachev invited to July's economic summit here would have to come jointly from the Group of Seven industrial nations.They suggested it was too early for a formal decision on the Soviet leader's attendance at the meeting of the West's richest nations.More time was needed to assess the Kremlin's commitment to economic reforms and their success, said an aide to Prime Minister John Major.
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HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
It was the most expensive campaign ever launched, but opponents were determined to defeat the president's health care reform plan. "Would socialized medicine lead to socialization of other phases of American life?" began one of the pitches used in a massive advertising and lobbying effort. "Lenin thought so. He declared: 'Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the Socialized State.'" That may sound like it was ripped from today's headlines — or at least, the debut this week of Fox News' latest talking head, Dr. Ben Carson.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 20, 1990
PARIS -- President Bush failed yesterday to win a promise of support from Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev for the use of force to oust Iraqi troops from Kuwait."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | October 31, 1999
Could life after communism have turned out better for Russia and its former Soviet neighbors? Mikhail Gorbachev insists that it could have. And things are so dismal today that his argument, tainted as it is by self-justification, is worth a fair hearing.In the eight years since Boris Yeltsin used the aftermath of the failed coup against Gorbachev to maneuver his rival from power, the Russian economy has shrunk steadily and natural riches have been spirited abroad. Wealth has been monopolized by a handful of unprincipled oligarchs while millions have slipped into destitution.
NEWS
July 1, 1998
Galina Brezhnev, 69, the daughter of former Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, died in a Moscow hospital, the ITAR-Tass news agency said yesterday. It did not give the cause or date of her death or any other details. Her father was Soviet leader from 1964 until his death in November 1982.Pub Date: 7/01/98
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has dropped his previous objection to a meeting between Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and leaders of the seven major industrialized democracies at next month's economic summit in London, a Bush administration official said yesterday.Mr. Bush's decision clears the way for the unprecedented meeting, at which the Soviet leader is expected to plead for extensive Western assistance to shore up his country's crumbling economy and to advance his embryonic economic reform program.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told President Bush yesterday that he was pursuing some new ideas for a diplomatic solution to the Persian Gulf crisis, but the White House was not optimistic about their chances for success.Mr. Gorbachev outlined his proposals to Mr. Bush in a 25-minute telephone call yesterday morning. Soviet Ambassador Alexander Bessmertnykh met twice with the president later in the day to follow up on the discussions.Mr. Bush told reporters the Soviet leader was "thinking innovatively" but would not describe the ideas in detail.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
TOKYO -- The Soviet Union faces "civil showdown" and the "chaos from which dictatorship emerges," President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned yesterday, and he asked the advanced world to accept the "resolve" he must show to save his country.Seizing the opportunity presented by his first public speech outside the Soviet Union since last fall, when he began a series of widely criticized and sometimes bloody steps against opponents, Mr. Gorbachev was unsparing in the dire picture he painted of political and economic conditions at home.
NEWS
By John Woodruff and John Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 16, 1991
TOKYO -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev became the first top Soviet leader ever to visit Japan today, arriving for a four-day visit he hopes will spur the world's second-biggest economic power into taking a major role in reviving his country's faltering production.Mr. Gorbachev and his wife, Raisa, stepped down from his presidential plane at Haneda Airport at 10:30 a.m. to shake hands with Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama and a line of diplomats from the Japanese Foreign Ministry.They were whisked into Tokyo in a bulletproof Soviet limousine to begin the opening formalities, including an audience with Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, before attending the first of three meetings with Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu this afternoon.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
The trade-off for Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is excruciating: He craves Japanese investment of $2.5 billion or more to exploit gas and oil on Sakhalin island. He would like some $28 billion in aid that Japanese sources have suggested is available to develop Soviet East Asia.If he could bring them home, such foreign gains might shore up his weak domestic support. And he knows that Japanese business hungers for the resources in the eastern sector of the Russian republic that is much closer to Tokyo than to Moscow.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 1999
MOSCOW -- In the days leading to her death yesterday, the Russian people finally granted Raisa Maximova Gorbachev what they had long denied her in life: their respect, their admiration, their sympathy.Raisa Gorbachev, who once annoyed the citizens of the Soviet Union as much as she charmed those of the West, died at 3 a.m. in a hospital in Muenster, Germany, where she was being treated for acute leukemia. She was 67.Her husband, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who opened the Soviet Union to the rest of the world, was at her side -- as always.
NEWS
July 1, 1998
Galina Brezhnev, 69, the daughter of former Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, died in a Moscow hospital, the ITAR-Tass news agency said yesterday. It did not give the cause or date of her death or any other details. Her father was Soviet leader from 1964 until his death in November 1982.Pub Date: 7/01/98
NEWS
March 6, 1996
MIKHAIL S. GORBACHEV, the Kremlin leader who presided over the dissolution of the Soviet Union, is such an unpopular man in today's Russia that there is a tendency to write off his renewed presidential ambitions as a joke. This is a mistake.Although Mr. Gorbachev's comeback is hardly likely, the 65-year-old former communist chief could perform a valuable service to his country by conducting a campaign so tightly focused on issues that it would force President Boris N. Yeltsin and Gennady Zyuganov, the neo-communist candidate, to outline their specific policies for Russia's future.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
When he was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Mikhail S. Gorbachev introduced a new word into the Russian language: "konsensus." But people got so tired of hearing about "konsensus" that it became a sort of running joke.Now, in the fractured body politic of Russia, where the splinters have splinters, the idea of bringing people and ideas together seems unimaginable. But if there is a consensus about anything, it is this: Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev -- the man who brought an end to the Cold War, made democratic elections possible and yesterday declared his intention to run for president -- stands virtually no chance of being the people's choice in the presidential election.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1994
MOSCOW -- In the end, not one of the men who plotted to rTC overthrow Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the 1991 failed coup will be punished: Gen. Valentin I. Varennikov, the last of 12 defendants, was acquitted of treason yesterday by the Military Collegium of the Russian Supreme Court.That brought to a close a three-year trial of the coup leaders.The other leaders of the hard-line coup, whose collapse brought on the breakup of the Soviet Union, have either died, seen the cases against them dismissed because of poor health, or been pardoned under a general political amnesty declared by Parliament in February.
NEWS
By Hearst Newspapers | April 8, 1994
PARIS -- Leonid I. Brezhnev and other members of the Soviet Union's geriatric leadership, many of whom were ailing, regularly took a secret "rejuvenating" pill in the 1970s and '80s that was not only supposed to keep them going but make them more youthful.Official archives just published by the newspaper Moscow News reveal that the masters of the Kremlin during the final decades of the Soviet empire lived in a Byzantine atmosphere in which medical quackery and superstition were the order of the day.Historian Peter Bogdanov, a specialist in Soviet history at Paris University, said the documents make clear that this obsession with miraculous cures contributed to the political paralysis and economic stagnation that were soon to destroy the communist system.
NEWS
By Melor Sturua | August 23, 1991
MIKHAIL Gorbachev has returned to Moscow, reinstated as president of the Soviet Union. A lot of people -- including the leaders of the West -- are happy it turned out this way. Gorbomania may even rise again.But in every way that matters, Gorbachev is a loser, not the winner. In the long run, I suspect that he will become a one-term president or, to be more optimistic, he will be re-elected as a ceremonial figurehead, the Soviet version of the queen of England.The real power will belong to the republics, especially to new Russia, to Boris Yeltsin, which is why Yeltsin is not the least interested in climbing to what some people might mistakenly call a "higher office."
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 19, 1991
TOKYO -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu ended 12 hours of summit talks early today without the "breakthrough" both had vowed to achieve in a territorial dispute that has stunted their countries' relations for four decades.Instead, they agreed to "accelerate" negotiations on the future of four small, flinty northern islands that Josef V. Stalin's forces seized in August 1945 as Japan surrendered at the end of World War II. The dispute has kept the two Far Eastern powers from signing a peace treaty formally ending that war.Mr.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 24, 1993
KIEV, Ukraine -- The talk in Kiev these days, as in othe outlying capitals of the former Soviet Union, is tinged with fear that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's defeat in a power struggle with his hard-line, nationalist parliament might give free rein to Russia's ancient instinct to dominate its neighbors.Leaders of nearly all the newly independent states -- including Ukraine and Georgia, whose relations with Moscow are most strained at the moment -- have sent messages of support for Mr. Yeltsin in the faint hope that their words will somehow help.
NEWS
By ARCHIE BROWN | December 29, 1991
Mikhail S. Gorbachev's real occupancy of the principal seat of power in the former Soviet Union lasted for less than 6 1/2 years. Yet within that time, he changed the world.Not all of the changes were intentional. The disintegration of the Soviet Union was the last thing that Mr. Gorbachev had in mind when he embarked on the reconstruction (perestroika), or radical reform, of the Soviet system. He was, however, prepared to move from a desire to reform the system to an attempt to make it different in kind.
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