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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
Fabian Homer Kolker, an international activist who brought Jews out of the former Soviet Union, died Tuesday of complications of diabetes at Sinai Hospital. He was 85 and lived in Pikesville. Long a passionate advocate of the state of Israel, he spent 30 years defending the rights of Jews in the former U.S.S.R. "He worked night and day to get people free from Russia," said Audrey Levine, a friend who lives in Baltimore County. "He did it for freedom." He first became interested in the plight of Soviet Jews in 1960 when he met with philosopher Bertrand Russell, who told him how families were being repressed in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
Fabian Homer Kolker, an international activist who brought Jews out of the former Soviet Union, died Tuesday of complications of diabetes at Sinai Hospital. He was 85 and lived in Pikesville. Long a passionate advocate of the state of Israel, he spent 30 years defending the rights of Jews in the former U.S.S.R. "He worked night and day to get people free from Russia," said Audrey Levine, a friend who lives in Baltimore County. "He did it for freedom." He first became interested in the plight of Soviet Jews in 1960 when he met with philosopher Bertrand Russell, who told him how families were being repressed in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 8, 1991
BERLIN -- A year after united Germany promised a "generous" treatment of Soviet Jews wanting to immigrate here, government rules and bureaucracy have significantly slowed the number of those entering.Government officials speak of necessary regulations to administer the former flood of asylum-seekers. But some Jewish leaders say Germany now is purposefully excluding Jews who want to come and making life difficult for those who manage to arrive."The government just feels trapped into accepting the Jews but really doesn't want them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1995
JERUSALEM -- When they were still in the Soviet Union dreaming of going to Israel, Soviet Jews used to ask: "What do you call a Soviet symphony orchestra after it returns from an engagement in Israel?" Answer: "A string quartet."When the big post-Communist wave arrived in Israel a few years ago, the new joke was: "A remarkable change has been observed among Israeli street cleaners. Two years ago they spoke Arabic. Since then, they have all learned Russian and acquired a higher education." After a few years in Israel, the Russian Jews told of placing an ad in a Moscow newspaper: "Soviet Jews!
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | May 16, 1991
BERLIN -- Germany has decided to stop giving Soviet Jewish immigrants preferential treatment and plans to deport back to the Soviet Union any who enter the country illegally.The move is in apparent contradiction of Germany's announcement shortly after unification last year that it would treat "generously" any Jew leaving the Soviet Union."It's definite. People either come through legal channels, or they are sent back," an official in the federal Interior Ministry said.Up to 500 of the 5,000 Soviet Jews who have entered Germany since last June are affected by the decision.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau The Knight-Ridder news service contributed to this story | March 1, 1992
JERUSALEM -- As a biologist in Moscow, Helena Kashman learned long ago that organisms placed in new environments must adapt to survive. As a recent immigrant to Israel, she is learning that adaptation is necessary both ways -- for newcomers and for their new country."
NEWS
By Robert Ruby | August 20, 1991
Israeli officials yesterday were forced by the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev to re-evaluate plans for Middle East peace talks and to begin preparing for a possible tidal wave of Soviet Jews wanting to emigrate.The turmoil threatened to upset months of planning for the peace talks scheduled to convene in October under Soviet and U.S. sponsorship. But Foreign Minister David Levy pledged Israel's willingness to participate with or without Soviet involvement.Mr. Gorbachev was the figure who ended decades of Soviet hostility toward Israel, first by reducing Soviet military support for hard-line Arab regimes.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | December 31, 1990
JERUSALEM -- As Israel celebrates today the arrival of its 200,000th immigrant of the year, officials are contemplating with growing concern projections that at least twice that number will arrive from the Soviet Union in 1991.Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir is scheduled to attend a welcoming ceremony tonight at Ben-Gurion Airport outside Tel Aviv even as members of his Cabinet acknowledge that the flood of Soviet Jews is outstripping the government's ability to provide basic services.Ministers predict that all possible housing units will be filled by the end of March, including hotel rooms and requisitioned army camps.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | December 3, 1990
Nearly five years after his celebrated release from a Soviet prison and the beginning of his free life in Israel, Natan Sharansky went to Towson last night to appeal to American Jews not only to support Israel monetarily but to create businesses there.Mr. Sharansky, whose struggle to leave the Soviet Union made )) him a celebrity in the eyes of Jews around the world, said that each day 2,000 Soviet Jews emigrate to Israel in search of freedom of expression, decent homes and productive lives.
NEWS
March 22, 1992
Election years are not especially good times for sensitive diplomatic maneuvering. Issues tend to be painted in stark terms on the hustings while they need to be discussed in shades of gray across the negotiating table. With both the United States and Israel embarking on national elections, the conflicting pressures of domestic politics and foreign policy are pushing both governments into extreme positions. The political intimacy and sense of common purpose that has marked the special relationship for several decades is dangerously frayed.
NEWS
By WILLIAM J. BENNETT and VIN WEBER | July 22, 1992
Early in his administration, Ronald Reagan made an important foreign-policy decision: Whenever the United States engaged in government-to-government negotiations with the Soviet Union, one of the first issues on the agenda would be the Soviet Union's atrocious record on human rights including its persecution of Soviet Jews.Realpolitik critics argued that while concern over human rights was all well and good, it was a real-world inconvenience that might jeopardize agreements in areas ranging from arms control to cultural exchanges.
NEWS
March 22, 1992
Election years are not especially good times for sensitive diplomatic maneuvering. Issues tend to be painted in stark terms on the hustings while they need to be discussed in shades of gray across the negotiating table. With both the United States and Israel embarking on national elections, the conflicting pressures of domestic politics and foreign policy are pushing both governments into extreme positions. The political intimacy and sense of common purpose that has marked the special relationship for several decades is dangerously frayed.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau The Knight-Ridder news service contributed to this story | March 1, 1992
JERUSALEM -- As a biologist in Moscow, Helena Kashman learned long ago that organisms placed in new environments must adapt to survive. As a recent immigrant to Israel, she is learning that adaptation is necessary both ways -- for newcomers and for their new country."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 26, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Deeply concerned about increasing chaos in the former Soviet Union, Israel has been building an infrastructure throughout the new republics that could airlift hundreds of thousands of Jews in an operation reminiscent of those launched in recent years to save Ethiopian Jews.Simcha Dinitz, director of the Jewish Agency, said yesterday that although he would not make the details public, contingency plans had been accelerated since the failed coup in August."No one can guarantee that there will not be another coup or civil war," Mr. Dinitz said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By JEROME GROSSMAN | October 25, 1991
The Middle East peace conference sponsored by the UnitedStates will most assuredly be held, because the collapse of Soviet military and economic power has left America dominant in the region. While this dramatic realignment affects all nations, none is affected as much as Israel.During the Cold War the United States subsidized Israel largely because it was a ''strategic asset'' in the military and political struggle with the Soviet Union.In return, Israel supplied its all with performance reports on the latest U.S. weapons systems, appraisals of Soviet military equipment captured from the Arab states, intelligence on conspiracies against the rulers of Egypt and Saudi Arabia, and surveillance and Soviet activities from planes and electronic interceptions.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | October 17, 1991
JERUSALEM -- When they were younger, they were friends. For more than 20 years, they have been officially estranged.Now they are on the verge of reconciliation: The Soviet Union, seeking to undo a break it acknowledges was a mistake, is on the verge of restoring full diplomatic ties with Israel, as one of the last procedural steps before the convening of a Middle East peace conference.The renewal of full ties could take place as early as today, when Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin is scheduled to arrive here to discuss his country's role in the talks.
NEWS
By WILLIAM J. BENNETT and VIN WEBER | July 22, 1992
Early in his administration, Ronald Reagan made an important foreign-policy decision: Whenever the United States engaged in government-to-government negotiations with the Soviet Union, one of the first issues on the agenda would be the Soviet Union's atrocious record on human rights including its persecution of Soviet Jews.Realpolitik critics argued that while concern over human rights was all well and good, it was a real-world inconvenience that might jeopardize agreements in areas ranging from arms control to cultural exchanges.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,Robert Ruby is The Sun's Mideast correspondent | April 28, 1991
After leaving the Soviet Union for a new country, finding an apartment in a new city and learning a new language, Felix Shai is beginning to worry that Israel offers Soviet immigrants less than they sought.Mr. Shai and his wife, Olga, are seeking jobs. In the Ukraine, he worked as a biochemist, she as a hospital bacteriologist, making them only two among thousands of well-educated Soviet immigrants, some of them disheartened, in a country hard pressed to offer affordable housing and productive work.
NEWS
By TRB | September 27, 1991
Washington -- The cringing ethnic is a pathetic specimen in American culture, whether it is Uncle Tom meekly defending his Master for selling him down the river (''It goes agin me to hear one word agin Mas'r . . . He couldn't be spected to think so much of poor Tom'') or Walter Lippmann oleaginously agreeing with Harvard's WASP president, A. Lawrence Lowell, that the university ought to have fewer Jews (''bad for the immigrant Jews as well as for Harvard if there were too great a concentration'')
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1991
JERUSALEM -- In what began as a dispute between the United States and Israel over financial aid, Israel's government now is being forced to choose between two goals central to its ideology: the absorption of thousands of Soviet Jews and the continued expansion of Jewish settlements in disputed lands.is a stark choice that Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir probably never expected to face.Since Israel captured the West bank and Gaza Strip in the 1967 war, every U.S. president has publicly opposed the development of Jewish settlements in the territories, arguing that it would obstruct negotiations for peace.
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