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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
He helped set up the first U.S. embassy in the Soviet Union. During Stalin's purge trials, he whispered a simultaneous translation of the proceedings into the ear of the clueless American ambassador. Later, when he became ambassador himself, he discovered a KGB bug in the hollowed-out American seal on his office wall.enormous sympathies. He was a man who saw things too deeply to join any political cause."Calvin Coolidge was president when George Frost Kennan signed up for the Foreign Service.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 2003
MOSCOW - In a small television studio in central Moscow crammed with cameras and video gear, anchorman Andrei Norkin recently sat at his desk and began what in Russia is a politically sensitive exercise. He delivered his afternoon newscast. Increased defense spending, he reported, is leading to more accidents during military exercises. The nation's politically sensitive courts, he predicted, would allow prosecutors to extend the custody of a businessman of keen interest to the Kremlin.
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NEWS
By Carey Goldberg and Carey Goldberg,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to resolve a major budget crisis, agreed yesterday to bail out Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's near-bankrupt central government -- at a price.Coming to Mr. Gorbachev's rescue the day after Soviet State Bank officials announced that their coffers were empty, Mr. Yeltsin said Russia would guarantee the state loans Mr. Gorbachev's government needs to keep functioning and merge the central government's costs into its own budget for the coming quarter.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
He helped set up the first U.S. embassy in the Soviet Union. During Stalin's purge trials, he whispered a simultaneous translation of the proceedings into the ear of the clueless American ambassador. Later, when he became ambassador himself, he discovered a KGB bug in the hollowed-out American seal on his office wall.enormous sympathies. He was a man who saw things too deeply to join any political cause."Calvin Coolidge was president when George Frost Kennan signed up for the Foreign Service.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1990
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Despite a warning from Moscow, Iraq is delaying the departure of 2,300 Soviet advisers now working at oil and military installations who Soviet officials fear could become targets in any attack on Iraq by U.S.-led forces in the Persian Gulf, Eastern European diplomats said yesterday.A high-level Soviet delegation arrived in Baghdad last night to begin negotiations to reduce the economic penalties Iraqi officials have told Moscow they will impose if the Soviet government walks away from several large oil, hydroelectric and military contracts that were employing about 7,000 Soviet technicians and other specialists when Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2.Moscow is seeking to negotiate a "temporary suspension" of its contracts with the Iraqi government in hopes that they can be resumed after a resolution of the crisis and the lifting of the United Nations trade embargo against Iraq, the Eastern European diplomats said.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1990
MOSCOW -- The president of Kazakhstan yesterday said an accident two weeks ago at a nuclear fuel plant had released a toxic gas cloud that affected "many inhabitants" of the city of Ust-Kamenogorsk, the Tass news agency reported.Nursultan Nazarbayev, president of the Kazakh republic, asked the Soviet government to declare the accident site in eastern region of Kazakhstan near the Chinese border an ecological disaster area.The number of victims in the accident and the nature of their injuries have not been made public, in a holdover from the secrecy that for many years surrounded industrial accidents.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 30, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet government took the first of what was expected to be a series of rapid steps aimed at economic liberalization in a bid to attract massive infusions of Western aid and investment.The Parliament voted 291-11 yesterday, with 29 abstentions, for a draft law that would clear the way for foreign firms to establish wholly owned businesses in the Soviet Union as part of a broad government program to privatize the economy.The moves come as the U.S.S.R. is lobbying for foreign assistance in rebuilding its collapsing economy.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 27, 1991
KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine -- President Bush declined yesterday to join the rush of European countries and Canada in recognizing the independence of the Baltic states, choosing instead to wait until the Soviet government ratifies their departure."
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
Baltimore's Ukrainians were cleaning up after a momentous celebration of Ukraine's new-found independence from the Soviet Union when they were startled by news that their homeland was joining a commonwealth with Byelorussia and the Russian republic."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 24, 1991
KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine -- President Bush praised yesterday's purge of Communist hard-liners from the Soviet government and the new power-sharing arrangement between Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin as moving in the direction he had hoped for."The changes appear to be coming toward the objectives we wanted," Mr. Bush told reporters as he began an afternoon on the links with golfer Arnold Palmer."The [Soviet] people appear to be moving toward objectives of United States foreign policy -- and in the process toward democracy, freedom, self-determination, all these things."
NEWS
By MARK FINEMAN | April 19, 1992
The man so big in stature and so brutal in technique that he was nicknamed "The Ox" was clearly in a good mood that day, beaming broadly as he predicted confidently that history would remember him as the savior of his nation.Seated at the big wooden conference table in an office ringed by security men, President Najibullah banged the table time and again to make his point. He belly-laughed, told stories of swimming against virtual tidal waves in the Caspian Sea and finally lowered his voice, narrowed his eyes and jabbed the air with a beefy finger as he summed up his five years at the helm of a nation at war with itself.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
Baltimore's Ukrainians were cleaning up after a momentous celebration of Ukraine's new-found independence from the Soviet Union when they were startled by news that their homeland was joining a commonwealth with Byelorussia and the Russian republic."
SPORTS
December 8, 1991
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) -- The NHL has offered to help hockey officials in the Soviet Union keep the structure of their sport viable after the collapse of the sport support system in their country."
NEWS
By Carey Goldberg and Carey Goldberg,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to resolve a major budget crisis, agreed yesterday to bail out Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's near-bankrupt central government -- at a price.Coming to Mr. Gorbachev's rescue the day after Soviet State Bank officials announced that their coffers were empty, Mr. Yeltsin said Russia would guarantee the state loans Mr. Gorbachev's government needs to keep functioning and merge the central government's costs into its own budget for the coming quarter.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 29, 1991
The recent political and social changes in the Soviet Union have come to the small, sleepy Eastern Shore town of Cambridge in the form of an economic blessing.Western Publishing Co. picked up one of the largest contracts in its 30-year history early this year when it was asked to print 2 million copies of the New Testament for distribution in the Soviet Union.By now these copies have made their way to residents in Moscow, Minsk and St. Petersburg, who have more freedom these days to read the words of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, and more orders could come in the future.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1991
Air so cold it numbed their faces and froze every breath. Ice so thick it took pickaxes and 10-pound mauls to open doors. Ships rolling in single file following the narrow channel cut by an icebreaker, sitting ducks for Nazi U-boat torpedoes and strafing airplanes."
NEWS
February 18, 1991
After five years of flirting with democracy and free market, the Kremlin seems to have decided those concepts cannot be transplanted to the Soviet Union in their Western form. Recently, ideologists and planners have become preoccupied with the experiences of China. There, economic successes have been achieved without relaxing the Communist Party's authoritarian controls.It is ludicrous for the Soviets to believe that what works in the Far East would work in their country. Traditions of culture and work ethic are totally different.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 29, 1991
The recent political and social changes in the Soviet Union have come to the small, sleepy Eastern Shore town of Cambridge in the form of an economic blessing.Western Publishing Co. picked up one of the largest contracts in its 30-year history early this year when it was asked to print 2 million copies of the New Testament for distribution in the Soviet Union.By now these copies have made their way to residents in Moscow, Minsk and St. Petersburg, who have more freedom these days to read the words of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, and more orders could come in the future.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 3, 1991
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the leaders of 10 Soviet republics yesterday outlined their plans for a completely new central government -- one that would be controlled by the republics through their chief executives.They told the Congress of People's Deputies, th conservative-dominated supreme legislative body that began meeting here yesterday to ponder the implications of the August coup, that they intend to sweep away the old structures of the Soviet government, including the congress itself.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 29, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned the Russian government of Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday against overstepping its bounds, as the issue of Russia's mushrooming power within what's left of the Soviet Union leaped to the fore.Mr. Gorbachev, who several days ago appeared to be acting virtually at Mr. Yeltsin's bidding, asserted his government's authority yesterday."Everything must be based on the constitution," he said.As if to demonstrate his command, Mr. Gorbachev dismissed the entire Collegium, or executive board, of the KGB, and effectively dismantled the secret police department as an instrument of the Communist Party's historic repression and fear.
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