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NEWS
February 8, 1991
The truly important news from the Soviet Union is not what President Mikhail S. Gorbachev may or may not do about independence referendums set by Lithuania and Estonia. The Baltic nations have so repeatedly and so strongly voiced their wish for independence that whatever the Kremlin does has little lasting significance.Far more crucial are the increasingly shrill attacks on Mr. Gorbachev's handling of the Soviet Union's affairs during his six years in power. Those attacks initially focused on the worsening economic conditions at home but now have been extended to foreign policy.
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NEWS
May 6, 2005
NATIONAL Roads allowed in national forests The Bush administration took sweeping action to open nearly 60 million acres - about one-third of the national forests - to road construction, which in turn could lead to logging, mining and other commercial use of the previously protected areas. [Page 1a] General to be demoted The Army said that only one senior officer - Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski - will be demoted for failed leadership in the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal and that more than a dozen lower-ranking officers will face a variety of punishments.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | December 29, 1991
LONDON -- Immediately after Josef V. Stalin died in March 1953, the new leaders of the Soviet Union, preoccupied until then with strategies for their own self-preservation, woke up to the fact that a new world was unfolding beyond their borders.The European colonial powers -- Britain, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Italy -- were weakened by war and had no will to hold together the vast territories they had colonized in Africa, Asia and the Pacific. From India, to Kenya, to Indonesia, colonial populations agitated and rebelled.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2004
MOSCOW - During his eight years as leader of the free world, Ronald Reagan evolved from a fierce Cold Warrior who called the Soviet Union an "evil empire" to "a man you could do business with," as former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would later describe him. He was both hated and feared by Communist hard-liners. But today, as people around the world mourn his death, Russia's overarching assessment of America's 40th president is largely one of respect and admiration. Many credit his peace-through-strength policies for hastening the downfall of the Soviet empire and curtailing the nuclear arms race.
NEWS
August 24, 2001
THIS WEEK, Russians commemorated the 10th anniversary of the failed 1991 coup that ultimately led to the collapse of the Soviet empire. Ordinary people keep asking themselves the seminal question of worldwide politics: Are we better off today? The short answer: Many are, but most aren't. A significant news item has gone almost unnoticed amid this week's hoopla: Russia and Ukraine have reunified their electric power grids. As a result of this act, Russia has now recreated virtually the entire power grid that once served the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | September 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Fidel Castro is refusing to repay Russia the $28 billion lent to Cuba by the former Soviet Union to help the island along as an enduring thorn in the side of the United States."
NEWS
October 18, 1991
Soviet winter, a gloomy period of Arctic freezing, is just around the corner. And the country, disorganized after the fall of communism less than two months ago, is ill prepared. Food supplies are erratic, the haphazard distribution system is falling apart. As people grumble, politicians quarrel.Just yesterday, Ukraine joined Moldavia and Georgia in deciding not to sign a key economic agreement that was supposed to bind 12 of the 15 former Soviet republics together in a loose common market.
NEWS
November 27, 1991
No end seems in sight to the disintegration of the Soviet Union. The refusal this week of seven republics to form a new rump union under President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's leadership is the kind of bad news that will benefit no one as a bitter winter sets in. It is impossible to think of any meaningful economic or societal overhaul in the former communist empire without determined cooperative efforts in the fields of foreign policy, nuclear armaments and...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2004
MOSCOW - During his eight years as leader of the free world, Ronald Reagan evolved from a fierce Cold Warrior who called the Soviet Union an "evil empire" to "a man you could do business with," as former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would later describe him. He was both hated and feared by Communist hard-liners. But today, as people around the world mourn his death, Russia's overarching assessment of America's 40th president is largely one of respect and admiration. Many credit his peace-through-strength policies for hastening the downfall of the Soviet empire and curtailing the nuclear arms race.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
"Invisible Allies," by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Translated by Alexis Klimoff and Michael Nicholson. Washington: Counterpoint Press. 344 pages. $29.50 Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, hero, genius, prophet, a man who never merely speaks but thunders as if from Olympia, a writer who risked terrible danger to expose the evil on which the Soviet empire rested, who never flinched despite the most sinister efforts of the KGB, has now done something quite unexpected. He has said "thank you."In his 1975 memoirs, "The Oak and the Calf," Mr. Solzhenitsyn described the battle he waged against the KGB to tell the world and his countrymen the truth about the enormous prison camp system that killed, tortured and enslaved millions of innocent people.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 28, 2004
MOSCOW - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell sought yesterday to allay Russian concerns over a growing American military presence in countries that once were part of the Soviet empire, saying, "We are not trying to surround anyone." In a radio interview, Powell said the U.S. might put small, temporary military facilities in several former Warsaw Pact countries that would be used for training of forces or as air bases for flying to crisis points in Central Asia, the Middle East and the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
August 24, 2001
THIS WEEK, Russians commemorated the 10th anniversary of the failed 1991 coup that ultimately led to the collapse of the Soviet empire. Ordinary people keep asking themselves the seminal question of worldwide politics: Are we better off today? The short answer: Many are, but most aren't. A significant news item has gone almost unnoticed amid this week's hoopla: Russia and Ukraine have reunified their electric power grids. As a result of this act, Russia has now recreated virtually the entire power grid that once served the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 16, 1999
PARIS -- The events in Berlin 10 years ago were foreseeable more than three decades before the wall fell. They were forecast by the East Berlin workers' uprising of 1953 and again by the Hungarian revolt and Polish mutiny of 1956 and the Prague Spring of 1968. Each event was a demonstration that the Soviet "empire" in Central Europe had failed to take root. Successful empires win collaborators and converts. Some of its subjects join the rulers' side because that seems where successful careers will be made.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 20, 1999
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- For Peter Kozyrev, the past screeched to an abrupt halt and the future took over in 1992, when a St. Petersburg artist produced and moderated a television program about Vladimir Ilyich Lenin and mushrooms.Both are holy in Russia. In the Soviet days, the first thing children learned in nursery school was how much Lenin loved them. When the Soviet Union collapsed, joyous crowds toppled Lenin statues across the Soviet empire -- everywhere except Russia, where his statues preside as majestically as ever.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
WITH A MIXTURE of horror and fascination, several former Soviet republics have been watching as Western Europe's twin pushes toward closer integration: through today's adoption of the euro common currency and through the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.Cut off from those efforts, Russia has launched a concentrated drive toward ``reinforcing the brotherhood of Slav peoples,'' as Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov put it. Recently, this effort has produced two important symbolic results: Moscow concluded a union pact with Belarus, which is in even worse economic shape than Russia.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
WITH A MIXTURE of horror and fascination, several former Soviet republics have been watching as Western Europe's twin pushes toward closer integration: through today's adoption of the euro common currency and through the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Cut off from those efforts, Russia has launched a concentrated drive toward "reinforcing the brotherhood of Slav peoples," as Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov put it. Recently, this effort has produced two important symbolic results: Moscow concluded a union pact with Belarus, which is in even worse economic shape than Russia.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 28, 2004
MOSCOW - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell sought yesterday to allay Russian concerns over a growing American military presence in countries that once were part of the Soviet empire, saying, "We are not trying to surround anyone." In a radio interview, Powell said the U.S. might put small, temporary military facilities in several former Warsaw Pact countries that would be used for training of forces or as air bases for flying to crisis points in Central Asia, the Middle East and the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
WITH A MIXTURE of horror and fascination, several former Soviet republics have been watching as Western Europe's twin pushes toward closer integration: through today's adoption of the euro common currency and through the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.Cut off from those efforts, Russia has launched a concentrated drive toward ``reinforcing the brotherhood of Slav peoples,'' as Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov put it. Recently, this effort has produced two important symbolic results: Moscow concluded a union pact with Belarus, which is in even worse economic shape than Russia.
NEWS
By Lawrence J. Korb | May 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The cold war is over, and the military-industrial complex has won. If there is any doubt, it should have been dispelled May 2, when the Senate and House defense committees approved bills adding approximately $13 billion to the Pentagon's request of $254 billion in spending authority for the fiscal year that begins on October 1.A year ago, the Republican-dominated Congress added $7 billion to the Pentagon's request. President Clinton over the last three years has added some $75 billion to his own defense program.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
"Invisible Allies," by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Translated by Alexis Klimoff and Michael Nicholson. Washington: Counterpoint Press. 344 pages. $29.50 Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, hero, genius, prophet, a man who never merely speaks but thunders as if from Olympia, a writer who risked terrible danger to expose the evil on which the Soviet empire rested, who never flinched despite the most sinister efforts of the KGB, has now done something quite unexpected. He has said "thank you."In his 1975 memoirs, "The Oak and the Calf," Mr. Solzhenitsyn described the battle he waged against the KGB to tell the world and his countrymen the truth about the enormous prison camp system that killed, tortured and enslaved millions of innocent people.
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