Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSoviet Communist Party
IN THE NEWS

Soviet Communist Party

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | August 1, 1992
Ever since moving to Baltimore two years ago, the American Center for International Leadership has been riding an emotional and financial roller coaster.America's foremost training organization for emerging Eastern European leaders came here from Indiana, confident of expansion and higher visibility. Then began a fall so sudden and scary ''it looked fatal at times,'' according to the center's president, Stephen Hayes.On January 19, 1991, the concluding round of U.S.-Soviet Chautomer the government-sanctioned citizen encounter ran into financial trouble.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- His prescience may not help him be confirmed as CIA director, but yesterday's coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev does confirm Robert M. Gates' reputation: the Bush administration's in-house pessimist was right.So was Alexander Yakovlev, once Mr. Gorbachev's top aide, who quitthe Soviet Communist Party on Friday, warning that a hard-line coup was in the works.But for the legions of American Sovietologists, the record is mixed.The effort to sort out who was right and who was wrong is a classic Washington response to an international crisis, as experts scramble to demonstrate that world events prove the soundness of whatever policy position they have been advocating.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said yesterday.Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M. Shakhrai, Mr. Yeltsin's top legal adviser, said that impounded Soviet Communist Party documents clearly showed that the party covertly aided "several dozen" foreign countries and organizations, among them the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
NEWS
August 26, 1991
The Soviet Communist Party's fall from power, just short of its 74th anniversary as the ruling force in the Soviet Union, is strangely like its rise to dominance in the October Revolution of 1917. It comes about in a tumultuous atmosphere of popular revulsion against the old order and euphoric expectations of the new. There is a near-certainty of upheaval, hardship and struggle in days to come.Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's resignation as secretary general of the party, his dissolution of its ruling committee, his confiscation of its vast properties and his denial of any essential party role in the future governance of the country has a finality akin to the Bolshevik seizure of ultimate authority from the czarist system in 1917.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said yesterday.Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M. Shakhrai, Mr. Yeltsin's top legal adviser, said that impounded Soviet Communist Party documents clearly showed that the party covertly aided "several dozen" foreign countries and organizations, among them the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1991
BEIJING -- In a reversal of their historic roles, China -- the recipient of massive aid from the Soviet Union before the two nations' bitter estrangement in 1960 -- is now offering to help the troubled Soviet economy with "commodity loans."The offer of the loans this week is only one example of the recently increased pace of Sino-Soviet rapprochement, which began with the renewal of official relations during Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit almost two years ago.Next week, during a visit by Soviet Defense Minister Dmitry T. Yazov, the two Communist giants are expected to take another step toward closer ties by sealing an arms deal in which the Soviet Union would earn badly needed cash by selling China a dozen Su-27 fighter jets and possibly other military technology.
NEWS
By Michael Mandelbaum and Michael Mandelbaum,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 1990
THE BUSH administration is about to confront one of the most difficult and painful questions in the history of Soviet-American relations: Has Mikhail S. Gorbachev outlived his usefulness?The continuing political struggle in the Soviet Union is forcing that question onto the political agenda of the West. On one side of that struggle are Mr. Gorbachev and his allies, who want to maintain a strong central government. Opposing them are the leaders of the Soviet Union's 15 constituent republics, led by Boris Yeltsin, the president of the huge Russian Federation.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF and WILLIAM PFAFF,William Pfaff is a syndicated columnist | January 14, 1991
A Russian right-wing dissident from perestroika was recently quoted as saying that there is an obvious explanation for what has happened to the Soviet Union: It is the result of a Western plot.He said that he had been told in the army that the CIA's ambition was to infiltrate the Soviet Communist Party and leadership so as to overthrow the Soviet system from within. They obviously have succeeded. Mikhail Gorbachev is the CIA's man. What other explanation fits the facts?This Russian's conviction that a Western conspiracy has ruined the U.S.S.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | August 1, 1992
Ever since moving to Baltimore two years ago, the American Center for International Leadership has been riding an emotional and financial roller coaster.America's foremost training organization for emerging Eastern European leaders came here from Indiana, confident of expansion and higher visibility. Then began a fall so sudden and scary ''it looked fatal at times,'' according to the center's president, Stephen Hayes.On January 19, 1991, the concluding round of U.S.-Soviet Chautomer the government-sanctioned citizen encounter ran into financial trouble.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | April 13, 1992
Steve Hanke has a three-part prescription to cure what ails Russia and the other countries of the former Soviet Union -- the institution of private property, the rule of law needed to ensure that, and a stable currency.It was an invitation to discuss his plans for currency that took Dr. Hanke to Moscow earlier this year for a meeting with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, a trip he has been invited to make again in June.Dr. Hanke, a professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University, is a free-market, supply-side economist who was among President Ronald Reagan's original Council of Economic Advisers.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA and ANTERO PIETILA,Antero Pietila, an editorial writer for The Sun, is a former editor for the Finnish newspaper Aamulehti | December 8, 1991
Helsinki, Finland. -- As the darkness of the Nordic winter sets in, more and more Finns are realizing they have never experienced a fall quite like this. Certainties of life, it seems, are slowly eroding.Not since the end of World War II, when defeat forced Finland to reach a political accommodation with its enemy, the neighboring Soviet Union, has the country been involved in such a painful self-examination. The disintegration and chaos of the Soviet Union has wiped out one-fifth of Finland's foreign trade, contributing to the highest unemployment rate since the 1940s.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
NEWS
August 26, 1991
The Soviet Communist Party's fall from power, just short of its 74th anniversary as the ruling force in the Soviet Union, is strangely like its rise to dominance in the October Revolution of 1917. It comes about in a tumultuous atmosphere of popular revulsion against the old order and euphoric expectations of the new. There is a near-certainty of upheaval, hardship and struggle in days to come.Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's resignation as secretary general of the party, his dissolution of its ruling committee, his confiscation of its vast properties and his denial of any essential party role in the future governance of the country has a finality akin to the Bolshevik seizure of ultimate authority from the czarist system in 1917.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- His prescience may not help him be confirmed as CIA director, but yesterday's coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev does confirm Robert M. Gates' reputation: the Bush administration's in-house pessimist was right.So was Alexander Yakovlev, once Mr. Gorbachev's top aide, who quitthe Soviet Communist Party on Friday, warning that a hard-line coup was in the works.But for the legions of American Sovietologists, the record is mixed.The effort to sort out who was right and who was wrong is a classic Washington response to an international crisis, as experts scramble to demonstrate that world events prove the soundness of whatever policy position they have been advocating.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- Communists rejoiced in their blandness yesterday.None of the recent uproar -- not the calls for President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's resignation, not the rumblings of martial-law enthusiasts, not the passion over the end of Marxist thought, not the feuding and sniping between left and right -- seeped to the surface of the plenary meeting of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union."
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA and ANTERO PIETILA,Antero Pietila, an editorial writer for The Sun, is a former editor for the Finnish newspaper Aamulehti | December 8, 1991
Helsinki, Finland. -- As the darkness of the Nordic winter sets in, more and more Finns are realizing they have never experienced a fall quite like this. Certainties of life, it seems, are slowly eroding.Not since the end of World War II, when defeat forced Finland to reach a political accommodation with its enemy, the neighboring Soviet Union, has the country been involved in such a painful self-examination. The disintegration and chaos of the Soviet Union has wiped out one-fifth of Finland's foreign trade, contributing to the highest unemployment rate since the 1940s.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | April 13, 1992
Steve Hanke has a three-part prescription to cure what ails Russia and the other countries of the former Soviet Union -- the institution of private property, the rule of law needed to ensure that, and a stable currency.It was an invitation to discuss his plans for currency that took Dr. Hanke to Moscow earlier this year for a meeting with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, a trip he has been invited to make again in June.Dr. Hanke, a professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University, is a free-market, supply-side economist who was among President Ronald Reagan's original Council of Economic Advisers.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1991
BEIJING -- In a reversal of their historic roles, China -- the recipient of massive aid from the Soviet Union before the two nations' bitter estrangement in 1960 -- is now offering to help the troubled Soviet economy with "commodity loans."The offer of the loans this week is only one example of the recently increased pace of Sino-Soviet rapprochement, which began with the renewal of official relations during Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit almost two years ago.Next week, during a visit by Soviet Defense Minister Dmitry T. Yazov, the two Communist giants are expected to take another step toward closer ties by sealing an arms deal in which the Soviet Union would earn badly needed cash by selling China a dozen Su-27 fighter jets and possibly other military technology.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF and WILLIAM PFAFF,William Pfaff is a syndicated columnist | January 14, 1991
A Russian right-wing dissident from perestroika was recently quoted as saying that there is an obvious explanation for what has happened to the Soviet Union: It is the result of a Western plot.He said that he had been told in the army that the CIA's ambition was to infiltrate the Soviet Communist Party and leadership so as to overthrow the Soviet system from within. They obviously have succeeded. Mikhail Gorbachev is the CIA's man. What other explanation fits the facts?This Russian's conviction that a Western conspiracy has ruined the U.S.S.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.