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By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet citizens, while obsessed with their country's economic plight, overwhelmingly oppose private ownership of basic industries and have serious reservations about transforming their state-operated economy into a free-market system, a new poll shows.The poll, designed to explore the attitudes of ordinary citizens regarding the momentous issues facing their country, found that only a bare majority favor the kind of free-market economy demanded by the Bush administration as a precondition for Western aid.Moreover, even many who favor such a policy, in theory, are opposed to it in specific details.
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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 1996
GIVAT HAMATOS, Israel -- Four years after the last election -- four years for Ludmilla Gasin in a mobile home that swelters in the summer and leaks in the winter -- the Labor-led government now says it will help her buy a home.Too late, she says."The big parties have cheated us. The Labor government didn't do anything. After all this disillusionment, the only thing left for immigrants is the Russian party," said the 58-year-old economist from Kiev, Ukraine.The Russian immigrants who began flooding into Israel as the Soviet Union collapsed are on the verge of becoming a potent political power in their adopted home.
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NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff Richard Irwin contributed to this story | July 24, 1991
The Soviet sailors who jumped ship in Baltimore this week to seek asylum in the United States are likely to be denied help, international law analysts say."My gut feeling is that these seamen will be returned to the Soviet Union," said Frank Gaffney, president of the Center for Security Policy, a public policy institution that researches and analyzes international news."The Bush administration, like the Reagan administration in its later years, is reluctant to complicate U.S.-Soviet relations by accepting highly visible defectors," Gaffney said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 1996
SOHREN, Germany - Emmi Schleicher arrived in Germany from her native Kazakstan six years ago and thought she had finally gone home to the land her ancestors left over two centuries before. Since then, she has learned a much more painful lesson.As an ethnic German in Kazakstan, she said, she faced nationalist hostility among Kazaks who called her a foreigner. Now she confronts another kind of animosity from Germans who do not accept her as a German and who accuse her and others like her of receiving social benefits they do not deserve.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev sternly warned Iraq yesterday that the united front of West and East against its occupation of Kuwait will not weaken and that it will face a "tough resolution" of the U.N. Security Council this week.Meeting with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz, Mr. Gorbachev "asked him to convey to Saddam Hussein an urgent appeal to weigh everything once more, because the fate of Iraq is in the hands of its leaders. Time is running out," the Tass news agency said.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 27, 1990
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday granted foreigners the right to 100-percent ownership of businesses in the Soviet Union, committing yet another heresy against Marxist orthodoxy in a move to lure investment in the ailing Soviet economy.The decree, issued under special powers granted to Mr. Gorbachev by the Soviet parliament, also said foreign businesses would be permitted to take out profits earned in Soviet rubles. But the ruble is not freely convertible, and the decree did not make clear how repatriation of profits would be accomplished.
NEWS
By The New York Times | January 30, 1991
IN A FIT of pure pique at his country's deepening economic morass, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has decided to crack down on both profiteers and inflation by withdrawing all 50- and 100-ruble bank notes in circulation in the Soviet Union.It is a harebrained scheme that would be laughable, were it not the latest symptom of a malaise that could prove terminal for Gorbachev. As such, it's no laughing matter for him or the rest of the world.Gorbachev, as he himself has conceded ruefully, is weakest on prescriptions for his tumbledown economy.
NEWS
August 26, 1991
What kind of new Soviet Union will emerge from the travail of seven days that shook the world? No one knows the answer to that question, but we could envision the following scenario:The first order of business is the signing of the new union treaty, which was the precipitating factor in the last desperate attempt of the old central bureaucracy to hold onto privilege and power. In fact, the treaty should be amended to bestow even greater power on the republics which have entered the treaty, placing them roughly in the same position as the American states.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | December 17, 1990
PRESIDENT BUSH now has taken directly on himself the responsibility for the lives and futures of all those millions of Soviet citizens who want to leave their country. The duty now becomes his not to feed them but to free them, not to save their government but to allow them to escape from it.Whether Bush acknowledges it or not, that is the moral and political consequence of his decision to send $1 billion worth of food on credit to the Soviet Union without condition -- and to channel all of it directly through the faltering government of Mikhail Gorbachev.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 20, 1990
Paris.---WHY SHOULD the West not tell the hungry Russians: Too bad; you brought all this on yourselves. Take the consequences. It was Russians who imposed Bolshevism on Russia. The leaders of the Soviet nation collectivized its agriculture, turning a food-exporting nation into the one which today asks foreign charity. They bestowed upon it the command economy whose collapse today has brought the U.S.S.R. to its knees. No foreign agency bears responsibility for any of that.Furthermore, it was not the West that murdered the Soviet Union's elites, debased its intellectual and artistic existence, sent millions to atrocious labor, or to death, in its Arctic camps.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | February 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The FBI is accusing Aldrich Hazen Ames, the CIA officer arrested on espionage charges this week, of betraying at least 10 Soviet citizens working for U.S. intelligence, government officials said yesterday. All were convicted of treason and executed in Moscow by the Soviet authorities, they said.The agents said to have been identified by Mr. Ames included the first two intelligence officers the FBI had ever recruited from the Soviet Embassy in Washington and a senior Soviet counterintelligence official in Moscow responsible for catching U.S. spies.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1992
MOSCOW -- George Blake, triple agent, came in from the bitter cold of a Moscow day yesterday and declared that even though communism hadn't quite worked out this time, it still deserved another chance.George Blake was a highly placed British intelligence officer 30 years ago when he was revealed as a Soviet spy who had betrayed 50 Western agents. He served six years in a British prison before making a dramatic escape to the Soviet Union.Yesterday he chatted companionably about his treason with reporters, more like a pensioner from an office job than a character worthy of James Bond "007" films.
NEWS
By Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | September 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The majority of people in Russia and the Ukraine "are not prepared for capitalism," have only an "embryonic" appreciation of pluralism and attach little importance to personal and political freedoms.These and other findings of a major poll by the Times Mirror Co. starkly demonstrate the difficulty confronting reformers trying to establish a new economic and political system in the former Soviet Union.The belief that people who make a profit are probably doing something illegal and a preference for state ownership of most businesses collide head-on with a stated wish for a "market economy."
NEWS
August 26, 1991
What kind of new Soviet Union will emerge from the travail of seven days that shook the world? No one knows the answer to that question, but we could envision the following scenario:The first order of business is the signing of the new union treaty, which was the precipitating factor in the last desperate attempt of the old central bureaucracy to hold onto privilege and power. In fact, the treaty should be amended to bestow even greater power on the republics which have entered the treaty, placing them roughly in the same position as the American states.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 23, 1991
Too bad the coup, the final flaring of a political faith now nearly extinguished, did not end with the plotters fleeing Russia by train from St. Petersburg's Finland Station, where Lenin arrived in 1917. The plotters were (in Lenin's phrase) useful idiots. Because of what they did, Mikhail Gorbachev cannot again be what he was, a retrograde force temporizing with a bankrupt system and retarding the advance toward democratization and economic rationality.Mr. Gorbachev now has the prominence of a ship's figurehead.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | August 20, 1991
English is the foreign language at Goucher College's Thormann International Media and Educational Center, where students come to study or watch foreign news broadcasts captured by satellite dishes atop Froelecker Hall.Russian was the language of choice yesterday, as professors, students and foreign visitors got a look at what Soviet citizens are learning about the coup in their country.Watching the Russian news program "Vremya," which means "Time," they got a view decidedly different from what Americans see and hear now that coup leaders have banned all non-censored media.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 23, 1991
Too bad the coup, the final flaring of a political faith now nearly extinguished, did not end with the plotters fleeing Russia by train from St. Petersburg's Finland Station, where Lenin arrived in 1917. The plotters were (in Lenin's phrase) useful idiots. Because of what they did, Mikhail Gorbachev cannot again be what he was, a retrograde force temporizing with a bankrupt system and retarding the advance toward democratization and economic rationality.Mr. Gorbachev now has the prominence of a ship's figurehead.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | February 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The FBI is accusing Aldrich Hazen Ames, the CIA officer arrested on espionage charges this week, of betraying at least 10 Soviet citizens working for U.S. intelligence, government officials said yesterday. All were convicted of treason and executed in Moscow by the Soviet authorities, they said.The agents said to have been identified by Mr. Ames included the first two intelligence officers the FBI had ever recruited from the Soviet Embassy in Washington and a senior Soviet counterintelligence official in Moscow responsible for catching U.S. spies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet citizens, while obsessed with their country's economic plight, overwhelmingly oppose private ownership of basic industries and have serious reservations about transforming their state-operated economy into a free-market system, a new poll shows.The poll, designed to explore the attitudes of ordinary citizens regarding the momentous issues facing their country, found that only a bare majority favor the kind of free-market economy demanded by the Bush administration as a precondition for Western aid.Moreover, even many who favor such a policy, in theory, are opposed to it in specific details.
NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff Richard Irwin contributed to this story | July 24, 1991
The Soviet sailors who jumped ship in Baltimore this week to seek asylum in the United States are likely to be denied help, international law analysts say."My gut feeling is that these seamen will be returned to the Soviet Union," said Frank Gaffney, president of the Center for Security Policy, a public policy institution that researches and analyzes international news."The Bush administration, like the Reagan administration in its later years, is reluctant to complicate U.S.-Soviet relations by accepting highly visible defectors," Gaffney said.
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