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NEWS
November 18, 1990
At the summit gathering in Paris, a treaty massively reducing maximum Soviet conventional armaments in the old Warsaw Pact area will be signed. Eighteen years in the making, it would have been considered a major diplomatic event if the Cold War still plagued Europe. Now, it will largely confirm what is already happening.Yet the statistics are staggering: 41,000 Soviet tanks down to 13,000; 57,000 armored combat vehicles down to 20,000; 52,000 artillery pieces down to 13,000 -- in all, a 40 percent reduction that will bring Pact ground forces level with NATO numbers.
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NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 15, 2014
Absent from U.S. media encomia for recently deceased former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze is any mention of the historic deal he reached with his U.S. counterpart James Baker in 1990 ensuring that the Soviet empire would collapse "with a whimper, not a bang" (Mr. Baker's words). Mr. Baker keeps repeating that the Cold War "could not have ended peacefully without Shevardnadze. " But he and others are silent on the quid pro quo . The quid was Moscow's agreement to swallow the bitter pill of a reunited Germany in NATO; the quo was a U.S. promise not to "leapfrog" NATO over Germany farther East.
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NEWS
May 19, 1991
Karl Marx got a couple of things right. He warned early Communists against taking power in Russia because the country was too backward for successful utopian experimentation. He also preached that political and social institutions derive their forms from the underlying economic circumstances in which they exist. Today's Soviet Union illustrates how painful it is when both the economic conditions and institutions are changing.In much Western analysis, recent tensions between the Kremlin and the 15 Soviet republics have been interpreted almost exclusively on ethnic grounds.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Whether deficient Soviet arms were a main cause of the Iraqi defeat or not, the reaction of the Kremlin's medal-bedecked generals has been swift.Impressed by the coalition forces' air power and precision weapons, Soviet Defense Minister Dmitri Yazov has ordered a snap review of the Soviet air force and air-defense system. "The echo of missile thunder in the desert must put us on our guard," explained Col. Gen. Rakhim S. Akchurin, commander of Soviet anti-aircraft forces.Some voices in the Soviet high command argue that "the outcome of any war is determined not so much by equipment as by the people who use it."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States renewed its circumspect encouragement of a Soviet bid to end the Persian Gulf war yesterday as the first fissure appeared in the Western anti-Iraq coalition, with a warning from Spain against bombing Iraqi cities.In a telephone call and subsequent written report, Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh told Secretary of State James A. Baker III that "there may be a gleam of hope" stemming from a visit to Baghdad by special envoy Yevgeny M. Primakov, the State Department said.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
VILNIUS, U.S.S.R. (AP) -- Soviet troops yesterday seized two more buildings in Lithuania, and pro-independence activists stood guard outside parliament and the television station as tension with the Kremlin deepened.The troops Friday seized four other buildings, including the national guard headquarters and the republic's main printing plant. Seven people were reported injured.Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who ordered paratroopers to enforce the draft in Lithuania and six other rebellious republics, has warned of direct Kremlin rule over the Baltic republic unless it backs off its independence declaration of last March.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
LONDON -- Stung by the cool reception given a preview of its plans for economic revitalization, the Soviet Union appeared to be lowering its expectations of Western assistance yesterday, even before President Mikhail S. Gorbachev makes his pitch for it to the leaders of the world's seven wealthiest industrialized countries meeting here.A massive infusion of immediate funds for the depressed Soviet economy appeared unlikely, but the Group of Seven did decide to at least make a strong statement of support for Mr. Gorbachev's economic and political reforms, a British official said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Elisha King and Joe Nawrozki and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
With about 75 onlookers waving goodbye from the Inner Harbor dock, a Soviet training ship sailed for Europe today minus two sailors who jumped ship yesterday and apparently sought asylum at the downtown office of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.The two seamen were identified today by an official in the Soviet Embassy as Aleksey Zolotarev and Aleksey Litovka. Both are believed to be from from Kaliningrad and about 20 years old.The embassy official in Washington said that both men are civilians, not cadets in the Soviet navy as earlier reported.
NEWS
By Scott Shane | August 22, 1991
As a perky Diane Sawyer peppered a smiling Boris N. Yeltsin with questions on ABC's "Nightline" Tuesday night, two questions might have occurred to even a novice student of coups d'etat.Why, 48 hours into the Soviet hard-liners' seizure of power, was their most prominent opponent, incidentally also the most popular politician in the Soviet Union, still free and in robust health, keeping up his scathing defiance of the junta from the comfort of his office a mile from the Kremlin?Why, moreover, was an American television star-journalist permitted to enter the country after the coup, arrange an interview with Mr. Yeltsin by telephone, travel to his building, carry a videocassette out and transmit it by satellite to New York?
NEWS
February 24, 2014
The swiftly unfolding of events in Ukraine over the weekend saw chanting crowds depose the country's president, political prisoners freed from jail, the emergence of an interim government led by opposition figures and warrants for the arrest of former security officials who ordered police to fire on demonstrators in Kiev. The rapid developments apparently caught both U.S. and European Union officials by surprise, coming as they did only hours after those powers had signed a deal with Russia for a more gradual transition.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Helga "Lollo" Lieselotte Pennewell, who escaped Soviet-occupied East Germany with her family for Maryland's Eastern Shore, where she spent 52 years as an educator and nationally acclaimed activist, died last week. She was 84. Ms. Pennewell was born to Alfred and Elsa Dallmann in Muhlhausen, Thuringia, Germany, on April 1, 1929. As a teenager, she qualified for Germany's Olympic swim team but never competed because the 1944 Games were canceled because of World War II. Ms. Pennewell attended Staatliche Oberschuk, a college in her hometown, where she earned the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in design and dressmaking.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Kenneth Dale Claborn, a retired Bendix Radio Corp. senior project engineer who worked throughout the Cold War, died Dec. 24 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in The Villages, Fla. He was 89 and had lived in Perryville and Parkton. Born in Texline, Texas, and raised in Sterley, Texas, he followed his father, Leonard Claborn, around the engine house he maintained for the Fort Worth and Denver Railway. His mother, Oleta Stauffer, was a homemaker and quilter. "My dad developed an early love of mechanics and railroading," said his son, David W. Claborn of Marion, Ohio.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
North Dakota State has built itself into a juggernaut in the Football Championship Subdivision, winning the last two national championships and going 23-0 since its last loss on Oct. 13, 2012, when Indiana State pulled off a 17-14 upset in Fargo, N.D. The Bison, who are 14-0 and the No. 1 seed in the NCAA playoffs, will meet No. 7 seed Towson (13-2) in the title game on Jan. 4 at 2 p.m. at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. Coach Rob Ambrose was quite complimentary on Monday of the team standing in the Tigers' path to the program's first national crown.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
It was the most expensive campaign ever launched, but opponents were determined to defeat the president's health care reform plan. "Would socialized medicine lead to socialization of other phases of American life?" began one of the pitches used in a massive advertising and lobbying effort. "Lenin thought so. He declared: 'Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the Socialized State.'" That may sound like it was ripped from today's headlines — or at least, the debut this week of Fox News' latest talking head, Dr. Ben Carson.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The star-crossed Moscow putsch was hardly over, and the blame game began on Capitol Hill.Yesterday's history-making events offered Republicans a fresh opportunity to bask in President Bush's international primacy."
SPORTS
By Jerry Crowe and Jerry Crowe,Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
The ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has left athletes from that country wondering about their futures.Soviet athletes mostly kept to themselves yesterday at several international competitions, including the cycling world championships in Stuttgart, Germany; the rowing world championships in Vienna, Austria; and the European swimming championships in Athens, Greece.The Canada Cup hockey tournament made plans for a possible Soviet withdrawal from the six-team competition even after being told that the Soviets would still participate, and a Soviet track and field official questioned whether his team would make it to the World Championships in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 12, 2012
This week on "The Amazing Race," Moscow will kill all of your dreams. You will find sadness and despair. You won't get engaged, you won't get invited to go clubbing, you won't be able to wear a bow tie in a swimming pool, it's just dreary. Cold and gray, like Seattle, but it's Moscow, people. The capital of hopelessness. Don't forget your passport. Before we dive into all that, though, remember last week when the Twins picked up Rock On's money and kept it? Phil Keoghan was getting all sorts of flak on Twitter for not mentioning it during their Pit Stop interview.
NEWS
By Jeff Blum | April 9, 2012
When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, many strategists suggested that the Cold War arms race had bankrupted its economy and caused its downfall. More than 20 years later, it appears that some in Washington are driving the U.S. toward a similar fate. Most recently, House Republicans (led by Rep. Paul Ryan) introduced a budget that both lavishly funds the Pentagon and slashes domestic programs. Mr. Ryan has even questioned whether generals were being honest in their assessment of the president's budget, suggesting, "We don't think the generals are giving us their true advice.
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