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By Brian Urquhart | April 18, 1991
NATIONAL sovereignty is defended as a universal and almost sacred principle. Moves that might diminish it are steadfastly resisted.Weighed against human suffering, a nation's sovereignty usually triumphs. In recent history nothing has illuminated this conflict more poignantly than the plight of the Iraqi Kurds.But many developments of our time challenge the validity of the principle of national sovereignty.Communications technology, pollution, radioactive debris, the flow of money, the power of religious or secular ideas, AIDS, the traffic in drugs and terrorism are only a few of the phenomena that pay scant attention to national borders or sovereignty.
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NEWS
October 18, 2010
In his commentary "Pro-immigrant is pro-business" (Oct. 17), Dan Rodricks is making a mockery of federal and local law enforcement efforts to curtail the flow of illegal immigrants across our nation's borders. Former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s argument "if someone breaks into my house, is that a new member of my family that night?" is valid and spot on. I may be only a middle income, registered Democrat and federal civil servant, but I recognize the fact that Governor Ehrlich is demanding that we respect the efforts of our federal and state law enforcement officials who are attempting to mitigate the dramatic flow of illegal immigrants into our nation and state!
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The seeds of possible future conflict lay in the agreement reached last week in London that ended the long years of civil war in Ethiopia.The United States has been urging Eritrea, the rebellious province bordering the Red Sea, a former Italian colony, to consider uniting with Ethiopia in a federal system of government instead of seeking full independence. Such a course, U.S. officials believe, could discourage an eventual renewal of civil strife.But the Eritreans are bent on full sovereignty.
NEWS
September 15, 2008
In the fight against al-Qaida, Pakistan's sovereignty has trumped America's desire to rout the terrorists. The U.S. pursuit of Osama bin Laden and his supporters along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border has been compromised by the departure of President Pervez Musharraf, a loyal if ineffective ally. The Bush administration hasn't smashed the terrorist network operating in that mountainous region, despite hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Islamabad. And there's little to suggest that Pakistan's new president will significantly help the U.S. cause.
NEWS
By MARTIN E. EVANS | January 24, 1993
Last Sunday, lots of Native Hawaiians marked the 100th anniversary of the event that led Hawaii on the path toward statehood. They weren't celebrating.A growing number of Native Hawaiian activists say that the U.S.-backed 1893 overthrow of the Hawaii monarchy, which placed Hawaii on the path to annexation and eventual statehood, has cheated Hawaiians of control over their lives and their land.Native Hawaiian activists, who marked the overthrow with a 100-hour vigil ending Sunday outside 'Lolani Palace in Honolulu, say Hawaiians must regain a measure of sovereignty if they are to end their exploitation and rise from the ranks of Hawaii's most downtrodden groups.
NEWS
By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas | August 14, 2008
For the coolest composure while going to war, the gold medal goes to Vladimir V. Putin. The Russian prime minister maintained his characteristic calm during Friday's Olympic opening ceremony in Beijing - giving a firm salute to the Russian athletes marching by - while he arranged for another kind of march into the disputed territory of South Ossetia. It's clear that Mr. Putin considers this payback time, not only for Georgia, Russia's meddlesome neighbor to the south, but also for President Bush.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff Writer | March 24, 1992
KAZAN, Russia -- A subtle, dicey and possibly devastating round of sparring began here yesterday, in the capital of the world's newest sovereign state, a historic city that is a muddy, fanciful, decrepit amalgam of East and West.Tatarstan, by voting for sovereignty over the weekend, has set in motion a contest of wills that will have consequences for all of Russia. It is a contest complicated by the number of players uneasily eyeing one another.Once there were only Tatars, the northernmost Muslim people, who ran everything.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 7, 1994
HAVANA -- The exodus of tens of thousands of people from Cuba is not another Berlin Wall collapsing on a Cold War dictator: Fidel Castro does not seem likely to fall soon.Though considerably weaker than 10 years ago because of the nation's dire economic straits, the 68-year-old maximum leader remains for many Cubans the symbol of national sovereignty.It was he who freed the country of its last vestiges of foreign domination, and it was he who established land reform, free schools and health care that are the envy of Latin America.
NEWS
March 8, 2002
ITS TRADITION of neutrality is so strong that Switzerland isn't a member of the United Nations, even though Geneva has more U.N. offices than any other city outside of New York. This odd situation is finally about to end. In a close referendum last weekend, voters gave their government a go-ahead to apply for membership in the United Nations. For decades, Switzerland was perfectly content to play the part of good host. The country was willing to facilitate but not get involved. As a result, a bewildering array of global headquarters concentrated there, from the International Red Cross to the International Olympic Committee to the World Council of Churches.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 5, 2004
ROME - Speaking slowly and softly to an attentive President Bush, Pope John Paul II reaffirmed his opposition to the war in Iraq yesterday and decried "deplorable events" related to it, an apparent reference to the abuse of Iraqi detainees by U.S. forces. In their third meeting since Bush has been president, the pope called for a quick return of sovereignty in Iraq, with an active role to be played by the international community, particularly the United Nations. "The recent appointment of a head of state in Iraq and the formation of an interim Iraqi government are an encouraging step towards the attainment of this goal," the pontiff said.
NEWS
By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas | August 14, 2008
For the coolest composure while going to war, the gold medal goes to Vladimir V. Putin. The Russian prime minister maintained his characteristic calm during Friday's Olympic opening ceremony in Beijing - giving a firm salute to the Russian athletes marching by - while he arranged for another kind of march into the disputed territory of South Ossetia. It's clear that Mr. Putin considers this payback time, not only for Georgia, Russia's meddlesome neighbor to the south, but also for President Bush.
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Feb. 11 1929 The Lateran Treaty was signed, with Italy recognizing the independence and sovereignty of Vatican City.
NEWS
By John Menzies and Marshall Harris | December 9, 2007
Tomorrow, the United States, the European Union and Russia will report to the United Nations on the latest round of talks on the future of Kosovo. They will be tempted yet again to delay resolution of the Kosovo question - even after three years of talks. On its face, the new report will be largely meaningless. The most recent talks were no more than a sop to Serbia and Russia. Positions have not changed, compromise has not been reached, and agreement remains a fatuous hope. Kosovo is determined to exercise its political self-determination by pursuing internationally recognized sovereignty and independence.
NEWS
September 16, 2007
Threat is seen to U.S. sovereignty History tells us that we will be celebrating the 220th year our Constitution has existed. It is certainly a landmark for our republic when you consider the efforts made by different individuals and groups to ignore or disparage it. During the week of Sept. 17-23, Americans throughout the country will be celebrating this unique document, which with the Declaration of Independence, forms the basis for our government. It states that our rights do not come from governor, king or government, but from God and are inalienable, meaning that they cannot be removed by any ruler or any government.
NEWS
March 27, 2006
Sovereignty is core of panda problem It is unfortunate that an article describing the ongoing controversy over the pandas the People's Republic of China (PRC) has offered to Taiwan should so widely miss the crux of a dispute that is part of a complex issue regarding sovereignty ("China using pandas in battle for hearts and minds of Taiwan," March 22). Contrary to what the article suggests, the Taiwanese government does not oppose accepting the pandas because it fears some ridiculous "Trojan panda" scenario.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
If the central government in Iraq actually mattered - if it had any authority or could hope to exercise any real sovereignty - ordinary Iraqis would be furious over the languid pace of negotiations to put such a government together. Months after the elections, parliament has yet to convene and the various factions are nearly stalemated over the selection of a prime minister. The country went to the brink of civil war and back again after last month's bombing of the Golden Mosque in Samarra, and even that did nothing to convey a sense of urgency to those dickering over Cabinet posts.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The surprise two-day head start on the scheduled transfer of Iraqi sovereignty, timed and conducted without fanfare to stymie feared insurgent disruption, was also a commentary on how eager the Bush administration was to shed its image as an occupying power. The sudden and dramatic move, bypassing any showy ceremony, enabled President Bush to tell the NATO summit in Istanbul "we have kept our word" and "the Iraqi people have their country back." But much depends on whether the new interim Iraqi regime is up to the task of governing.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and By Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 2000
JERUSALEM - Of all the tough issues at Camp David, Jerusalem has proved the most intractable. And when the talks practically collapsed yesterday, the question of sovereignty over the holy city was widely believed to be the cause. The gaps were said to be too wide. Or are they? Given the white-hot passions over the issue among Israelis and Palestinians, neither side could be seen to have given up Jerusalem. It could cost Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak his job. Some say it could cost Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat his life.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Ann Mech and Randy Nixon have many similarities. They are devoted to the land, widely respected, selfless, thoughtful and abstain from extreme positions. But the controversy over efforts to preserve farmland by imposing tighter restrictions on development in Western Howard County has created a chasm between the two. Mech sees those efforts as necessary tinkering, while Nixon views them as a challenge to sovereignty and property rights. The gap between them, though, is an emblem of the fissure on the citizens committee attempting to fashion a delicate compromise to foster conservation without financially harming large property owners and the homebuilding industry.
NEWS
July 31, 2004
Q: Now that sovereignty in Iraq has been restored to Iraqi hands, how long should U.S. troops remain in that country? As a peace activist, I demand an immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops, contractors and corporations from Iraq. The so-called liberation of Iraq is a farce. More than 900 U.S. soldiers and thousands of Iraqi civilians are already dead in the war in Iraq. How many more must die in this quagmire? The situation is dire, both for the occupiers and the occupied. A pull-out is inevitable, so why not do it immediately?
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