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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2006
Summer's fading faster than the tan you got last weekend in Ocean City. Along with it, the travel season is winding down to fall cruises and leaf-peeping bargains. But we don't want to let go of the summer of '06 that quickly. We want to remember the glorious beauty of French Polynesia, the castles of Prague, the smell of the sea in Maine. We want to forget the long lines, the tossed toiletries, the credit card bill and that night in Vegas. Luckily we have a few treasured souvenirs of our vacations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2014
It seems that everyone is taking the Ice Bucket Challenge to help support ALS research, including our own Baltimore Ravens. In O.J Brigance, however, the Ravens have a special connection with the ALS community - and for that reason the Ravens can and should make their own unique and tangible contribution to the cause ( "O.J. Brigance speaks out on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge," Aug. 14). As a special honor for O.J., a key special teams player on the Ravens' first championship team, and as a way for the city of Baltimore and for Ravens fans everywhere to both show their pride and help fight ALS, replica 2000 Super Bowl jerseys with Mr. Brigance's name and number could be made and sold through the Ravens with the proceeds going to the O.J.'s Brigance Brigade Foundation (www.brigancebrigade.org)
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NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO and ANN LOLORDO,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1995
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Brian White delivered his own sermon yesterday to the papal throng at Giants Stadium."Patience is a virtue," the exasperated vendor told souvenir seekers who mobbed his concession stand in the hours before Pope John Paul II celebrated Mass.Working alone in his booth on the stadium's mezzanine level, the 21-year-old had trouble keeping up with the demands for souvenir T-shirts, glow-in-the-dark rosary beads and commemorative books.For nearly seven hours, Mr. White waited on customers until the Mass began at 6 p.m. Asked how his day went, the vendor replied wearily, "Rough."
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Now what would vacation be without a few trinkets to remember the trip? There is a multitude of gimmicky t-shirts, cups and other pieces of beach memorabilia, but very few of the gimmicky trinkets allow for a personal touch. If you want that, grabbing telescope photos or "scopes" with your friends and family is the way to go. I know what you might be thinking. "Those things? The ones with the annoying people that run up to you on the beach and try to sell you pictures?" Yes, you might be right to a point, but stay with me. You are on vacation.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
The Baysox will officially leave Baltimore this week for their real home, Bowie.Their new offices will be opening, and, come spring, they are to have a new ballpark and a full-time gift shop.One team focus in 1994 will be souvenir merchandise.According to general manager Keith Lupton, the Baysox did not Notebookattempt to sell anything nationally this season. This will change with an ad geared to holiday purchases soon to appear in a Baseball America publication."I'd say it's safe to say we're going to get into the souvenir business in a big way," Lupton says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Florence Foster Jenkins could most easily have summed up her, um, art, by paraphrasing a line from The Importance of Being Earnest: "I don't sing accurately - anyone can sing accurately - but I sing with wonderful expression." Excruciating expression. Jenkins, whose sold-out recital at Carnegie Hall in 1944 is the stuff of legend, inspired Stephen Temperley's amusing, affectionate, somewhat-overpadded show Souvenir, which opened Thursday at Center Stage with the original stars of the 2005 Broadway production.
FEATURES
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 8, 1996
You go to the Atlantic, and you can't take the whole ocean back with you. There are rules, after all. But you want to bring back a little something to remember it by.It might be a perfect seashell gathered on that final perfect morning as you and your lover walked hand-in-hand along the beach.Or it might be a dead baby shark preserved in a jar of formaldehyde.There is no such thing as "tourist junk" (though a dead baby shark in a jar -- found in a Newport, R.I., store for $9.99 -- comes real close)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | September 12, 1999
When people talk about Baltimore filmmakers, the names Levinson and Waters are the first to spring to mind.But Baltimore is also home to some significant and influential filmmakers who have chosen to work outside the commercial mainstream of their better-known peers. While Barry Levinson and John Waters put Baltimore on the map by representing the city in their own ways, artists like Rob Tregenza, Martha Colburn and Skizz Cyzyk make films that have put the city on quite another map: as a place to make experimental work that challenges conventional notions of narrative.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Scores of hawkers descended on Camden Yards before dawn yesterday to sell everything from papal "rookie" cards to temporary pope tattoos to luminescent papal medallions."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004
Some baseballs that reach the fans in the stands end up displayed in gleaming cases in the Hall of Fame, or get auctioned off to comic book moguls for millions, or are fought over in courtrooms by someone who says someone else elbowed him out of a piece of baseball history. But most others have a more modest fate. They are those balls' poor cousins, you might say. Balls that (almost) never affect the course of a game, never even make it into the field of play, never evoke the deafening roar that says it's outta here!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | March 22, 2012
Previously: the new Salani was awesome, and the new Manono sucked. Back at Manono after Tribal Council, Alicia and Colton can't help gloating over the "blindside" they gave Monica; then they add to it by taunting Christina about how she has no alliance, and even if she makes it to the merge, she'll be toast. And then they get downright mean, barely letting her sleep in the shelter. Christina believes that Alicia is “genuinely not a good person,” and I have to say that I agree with her. Let's hope that she gets what's coming for her, if there is any karma in the universe at all. At Salani, they agree with me about Alicia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Mohammad Akram Bhatti, the owner of an Edgewater gas station and convenience store, died of cerebral meningitis Nov. 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 68 and lived in Crofton. Born in Nabah, India, he moved with his family to the Punjab province in Pakistan as a child. He earned a degree from Islamia College in Lahore, Pakistan. He worked briefly for Lever Brothers in Karachi, Pakistan. Family members said that in 1969, with only some pocket money, he immigrated to Florida, where he studied at Florida Memorial College.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
Unable to raise the needed funds to present the announced premiere of D.L. Coburn's "Return to Bluefin," the Bay Theatre instead is presenting "Souvenir," an amusing play with a two-person cast and a piano that fits Bay's intimate space and restricted budget. Steven Temperley's memory play debuted in New York in 2005 and chronicles the amazing heights scaled by supremely confident tone-deaf diva Florence Foster Jenkins, who rose to cult fame that culminated in a 1944 sold-out Carnegie Hall appearance at age 76. Her accompanist for 12 years was Cosme McMoon, who recalls his experiences 20 years after Jenkins' death.
NEWS
March 20, 2010
The Preakness made a change last year that was both bold and overdue: It ended the BYOB infield. It was a long-standing tradition that brought us memorable feats of drunken stupidity, from the running of the port-a-potties to, legend has it, the attempt to punch a horse in the middle of a race. It was a muddy, foul, debauched mess. Beloved by some, decried by others as a rather poor reflection on the city, it was probably a lawsuit waiting to happen. The change was not greeted warmly by infield denizens, and attendance for last year's race was the lowest in 25 years and down by more than a third from the previous year.
SPORTS
March 20, 2010
T he Preakness made a change last year that was both bold and overdue: It ended the BYOB infield. It was a long-standing tradition that brought us memorable feats of drunken stupidity, from the running of the port-a-potties to, legend has it, the attempt to punch a horse in the middle of a race. It was a muddy, foul, debauched mess. Beloved by some, decried by others as a rather poor reflection on the city, it was probably a lawsuit waiting to happen. The change was not greeted warmly by infield denizens, and attendance for last year's race was the lowest in 25 years and down by more than a third from the previous year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
It takes a soprano as talented as Tony Award-winner Judy Kaye to create such a dreadful din every time she opens her mouth to sing. In Center Stage's current production of Souvenir, Kaye portrays the real-life Florence Foster Jenkins, dubbed the Screama Donna by caustic critics for her utter inability to warble on pitch. As Jenkins, Kaye launches into the notoriously demanding "Queen of the Night" aria from Mozart's The Magic Flute. Like a mountain climber, she scrambles resolutely up a two-octave scale.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2002
These were regular folks from ordinary American towns. They cared for their families and went to church, and occasionally they would gather to commit ritual murder. The things they did to the bodies of African-American men would not make fit talk for Sunday dinner. Nonetheless, often enough someone took photographs to remember how the corpse looked hanging from tree or trestle, or burned on a pyre, and how townspeople young and old gathered around in white shirts and white hats. Sometimes they smiled for the camera.
FEATURES
By Lita and Sally Solis-Cohen | May 30, 1993
"The most important factor to consider when buying souvenir china is the image," advised collector Laurence Williams, a hotel consultant in Chatham, Mass. "If a piece is in excellent condition, has an unusual shape or view, shows a popular vacation spot, depicts someone's hometown, or is particularly nostalgic, prices generally will be on the high end," he added.Prices generally rise when the view on a souvenir no longer exists. "So many of these scenes are gone now. They've been replaced by parking lots," said Gary Leveille, editor of Antique Souvenir Collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Florence Foster Jenkins could most easily have summed up her, um, art, by paraphrasing a line from The Importance of Being Earnest: "I don't sing accurately - anyone can sing accurately - but I sing with wonderful expression." Excruciating expression. Jenkins, whose sold-out recital at Carnegie Hall in 1944 is the stuff of legend, inspired Stephen Temperley's amusing, affectionate, somewhat-overpadded show Souvenir, which opened Thursday at Center Stage with the original stars of the 2005 Broadway production.
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