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By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
The questions could trigger a Baltimore detective novel: Why were Lula Mrozinski's driver's license and bankbook buried beneath an 8,000-pound, 62-year-old duckpin lane at Federal Hill's Southway Bowling Center? Were they stolen? Do they hold clues to a mystery? Was Lula Mrozinski simply careless, as her husband always said? Mrozinski died seven years ago, and we may never know all the answers. Her license - so old it has no picture - and other decades-old items were uncovered yesterday as workers pulled up Southway Bowling Center's maple wood lanes and moved them out of a top-floor window of the three-story building.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
Cliff Kidd, the No. 1-ranked duckpin bowler in the country during the 1944-1945 season who later owned his own alleys, died of cancer Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 93. "He was consistent, well known for his competitive skills and evenness in duckpin bowling," said his son, Clifford Joseph "Cliff Jr." Kidd of Perry Hall. "Even as duckpin bowling's popularity waned in recent years, my father retained his overwhelming enthusiasm for the sport." Born Clifford H. Kidd in Baltimore and raised on Scott Street in Pigtown, he left Polytechnic Institute during his junior year to help support his family during the Depression.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2000
There is no evidence that God ever set foot on the maple wood lanes of the historic, soon-to-be-closed Southway Bowling Center in Federal Hill. But faith transcended doubt yesterday morning at SS. Stephen and James' Evangelical Lutheran Church, where impassioned testimonials of his pin-side presence were taken as gospel in a service that paid homage to the 61-year-old duckpin landmark. "We know in our heart and in our memories that God's grace was present with us each time we bowled," church member Mel Tansill told the crowd of about 100 worshipers.
NEWS
July 29, 2006
A man was found slumped on a bicycle, dead of a gunshot wound to the head, in the 2600 block of Loyola Southway yesterday morning, police said. The unidentified man was found by police who were called to the scene at 5:05 a.m. based on an initial report of a head injury. The victim was taken to Sinai Hospital where he was pronounced dead a short time later, police said. Police said they know of no motive, witnesses or suspects. Two other people were fatally shot Sunday night just a block away, in the 2500 block of Loyola Southway.
NEWS
October 25, 2000
BEYOND THE UPSCALE appeal and great restaurants, Federal Hill is also home to a large family community with limited off-street opportunities for children's supervised activities. Were it not for the South Baltimore Recreation Center's Friday night "Juvenile Java Club" geared toward teen-agers, there would be a virtual black hole for family activity in the area. The exception is the Southway Bowling Center at 1000 S. Charles St. -- duckpin country. From toddler to senior citizen, there is pure enjoyment in this simple sport, which is commemorating its 100th birthday this year.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
The maplewood duckpin lanes from the now-closed Southway Bowling Center in Federal Hill have been spared - and there's a plan to put them back in use at Locust Point's former Coca-Cola plant, which could soon be bustling with high-tech workers. The idea of dot-com workers bowling duckpins on their coffee break might seem odd, but this is Baltimore, and the sport was invented here. Most of Southway's 26 lanes will be temporarily stored for $1 a month in the Coca-Cola plant, one of Baltimore's old factories that is being turned into office space.
NEWS
July 29, 2006
A man was found slumped on a bicycle, dead of a gunshot wound to the head, in the 2600 block of Loyola Southway yesterday morning, police said. The unidentified man was found by police who were called to the scene at 5:05 a.m. based on an initial report of a head injury. The victim was taken to Sinai Hospital where he was pronounced dead a short time later, police said. Police said they know of no motive, witnesses or suspects. Two other people were fatally shot Sunday night just a block away, in the 2500 block of Loyola Southway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein | December 3, 2000
The game was invented, it's said, just a few blocks away. It will still be played at a few alleys left around town. But at Southway Bowling Center, the two-story, 61-year-old duckpin palace where church leagues competed, politicians glad-handed and, legend has it, Babe Ruth himself bowled, the last five-inch ball has been rolled. Alva Brown says as long as she doesn't think about it too hard, she won't cry. "Oh, golly," she says, with a long sigh. "It's something." She was there six days a week for 42 years, has been there every day since Southway was forced to close three weeks ago. She calls it cleaning, but it seems more like habit.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
The conversion of Southway Bowling Center from old Baltimore to new has been delayed two weeks, giving preservationists until the end of the month to find a home for the 61-year-old maple lanes. Southway, which will soon become New York-style loft apartments, was supposed to close Saturday. But developers decided to wait two weeks to give residents a chance to save the lanes and bowl at the Federal Hill landmark one last time. Developers Patrick Turner of Henrietta Corp. and Glenn Charlow of Manekin Corp.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 23, 2000
MY PHONE has been going crazy this week with word that the duckpin bowling alleys at Southway Bowling Center in South Baltimore will close the middle of next month. Its space will be taken by upscale apartments. There's so much noise being made you would think the Cross Street Market was on fire. I can see why. The Southway, where my father learned to bowl, is a Baltimore classic, one flight up over what used to be the Henry Wessel dry goods store and is today a CVS. You enter the lanes at the corner of South Charles and Hamburg streets, the heart of the Federal Hill shopping district.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH AND RICHARD IRWIN and LAURA MCCANDLISH AND RICHARD IRWIN,SUN REPORTERS | July 24, 2006
Two unidentified men were fatally shot minutes apart early yesterday in separate sections of Baltimore, city police reported. Officers responding to a 911 call of a man shot about 5 a.m. found the victim lying in the 1900 block of Guilford Ave., bleeding from multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body. Fire Department paramedics pronounced the man dead at the scene, police said. About 30 minutes earlier, in an apparently unrelated crime, officers checking out a report of a shooting in the 2300 block of Loyola Southway found a man lying in the street with at least one bullet wound.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 3, 2003
Many inns have their own restaurants, but how many restaurants have their own inns? At least one in Baltimore will soon, if owners of the Black Olive restaurant in Fells Point finally move ahead with plans to build a $2.4 million inn and market, one block away. Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel last week approved preliminary plans for a four-story building at 803. S. Caroline St. that would contain 14 to 16 guest rooms, a bar, a "Dean & DeLuca style" market and a rooftop cafe and lounge.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
The questions could trigger a Baltimore detective novel: Why were Lula Mrozinski's driver's license and bankbook buried beneath an 8,000-pound, 62-year-old duckpin lane at Federal Hill's Southway Bowling Center? Were they stolen? Do they hold clues to a mystery? Was Lula Mrozinski simply careless, as her husband always said? Mrozinski died seven years ago, and we may never know all the answers. Her license - so old it has no picture - and other decades-old items were uncovered yesterday as workers pulled up Southway Bowling Center's maple wood lanes and moved them out of a top-floor window of the three-story building.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
The maplewood duckpin lanes from the now-closed Southway Bowling Center in Federal Hill have been spared - and there's a plan to put them back in use at Locust Point's former Coca-Cola plant, which could soon be bustling with high-tech workers. The idea of dot-com workers bowling duckpins on their coffee break might seem odd, but this is Baltimore, and the sport was invented here. Most of Southway's 26 lanes will be temporarily stored for $1 a month in the Coca-Cola plant, one of Baltimore's old factories that is being turned into office space.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein | December 3, 2000
The game was invented, it's said, just a few blocks away. It will still be played at a few alleys left around town. But at Southway Bowling Center, the two-story, 61-year-old duckpin palace where church leagues competed, politicians glad-handed and, legend has it, Babe Ruth himself bowled, the last five-inch ball has been rolled. Alva Brown says as long as she doesn't think about it too hard, she won't cry. "Oh, golly," she says, with a long sigh. "It's something." She was there six days a week for 42 years, has been there every day since Southway was forced to close three weeks ago. She calls it cleaning, but it seems more like habit.
NEWS
October 25, 2000
BEYOND THE UPSCALE appeal and great restaurants, Federal Hill is also home to a large family community with limited off-street opportunities for children's supervised activities. Were it not for the South Baltimore Recreation Center's Friday night "Juvenile Java Club" geared toward teen-agers, there would be a virtual black hole for family activity in the area. The exception is the Southway Bowling Center at 1000 S. Charles St. -- duckpin country. From toddler to senior citizen, there is pure enjoyment in this simple sport, which is commemorating its 100th birthday this year.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
Federal Hill's historic Southway Bowling Center is closing to be converted into upscale loft apartments. And Alva Brown, duckpin hall-of-famer in the city where the sport was born, said it's a tragedy. "Feel bad for the kids," said Brown, 78, who runs the 61-year-old southern Baltimore landmark with her son. "Where are they going to go?" Duckpin bowling is a celebrated Baltimore pastime that, according to local lore, was invented at a Howard Street tavern a century ago by Orioles John McGraw and Wilbert Robinson.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH AND RICHARD IRWIN and LAURA MCCANDLISH AND RICHARD IRWIN,SUN REPORTERS | July 24, 2006
Two unidentified men were fatally shot minutes apart early yesterday in separate sections of Baltimore, city police reported. Officers responding to a 911 call of a man shot about 5 a.m. found the victim lying in the 1900 block of Guilford Ave., bleeding from multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body. Fire Department paramedics pronounced the man dead at the scene, police said. About 30 minutes earlier, in an apparently unrelated crime, officers checking out a report of a shooting in the 2300 block of Loyola Southway found a man lying in the street with at least one bullet wound.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
The conversion of Southway Bowling Center from old Baltimore to new has been delayed two weeks, giving preservationists until the end of the month to find a home for the 61-year-old maple lanes. Southway, which will soon become New York-style loft apartments, was supposed to close Saturday. But developers decided to wait two weeks to give residents a chance to save the lanes and bowl at the Federal Hill landmark one last time. Developers Patrick Turner of Henrietta Corp. and Glenn Charlow of Manekin Corp.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2000
There is no evidence that God ever set foot on the maple wood lanes of the historic, soon-to-be-closed Southway Bowling Center in Federal Hill. But faith transcended doubt yesterday morning at SS. Stephen and James' Evangelical Lutheran Church, where impassioned testimonials of his pin-side presence were taken as gospel in a service that paid homage to the 61-year-old duckpin landmark. "We know in our heart and in our memories that God's grace was present with us each time we bowled," church member Mel Tansill told the crowd of about 100 worshipers.
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