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NEWS
October 3, 1996
Utah citizens back wilderness protectionGiven The Sun's admirable editorial record in support of environmental protection and wild land preservation, it was unfortunate to see you (''Clinton's monumental decision,'' Sept. 20.) fall for some of the bogus arguments opponents used to criticize President Clinton's decision to create the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah's incomparable redrock region.You appear to agree with the contention that ''locking away 62 billion tons of low-sulfur coal, preferred by power plants as less polluting, may be a greater loss to the environment.
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NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
Recapture Canyon, Utah -- It's a small gesture of defiance - a narrow metal bridge that allows off-road vehicles illegal access to this archaeologically rich canyon. But the modest structure, built by San Juan County officials on U.S. government land, is a symbol of the widespread local resistance to federal authority across much of southern Utah's magnificent countryside. Historically, residents of the rural West have challenged federal jurisdiction, claiming authority over rights of way, livestock management and water use. But nowhere is the modern-day defiance more determined, better organized or better funded than in Utah, where millions of taxpayer dollars are being spent fighting federal authority, and where the state government is helping to pay the tab - much of it, critics say, without oversight.
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NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
Recapture Canyon, Utah -- It's a small gesture of defiance - a narrow metal bridge that allows off-road vehicles illegal access to this archaeologically rich canyon. But the modest structure, built by San Juan County officials on U.S. government land, is a symbol of the widespread local resistance to federal authority across much of southern Utah's magnificent countryside. Historically, residents of the rural West have challenged federal jurisdiction, claiming authority over rights of way, livestock management and water use. But nowhere is the modern-day defiance more determined, better organized or better funded than in Utah, where millions of taxpayer dollars are being spent fighting federal authority, and where the state government is helping to pay the tab - much of it, critics say, without oversight.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | October 23, 2004
BREAK FREE of the Baltimore Beltway, slide onto the very beginning of westbound Interstate 70, and in a mile or so there it is on the left, on the median strip, that new highway sign, big and bright and proclaiming an American continent of possibilities. The 10-foot-by-22-foot sign, installed by the state last July, flatly announces: "Columbus 420 miles St. Louis 845 miles Denver 1700 miles Cove Fort 2200 miles" That's Cove Fort, Utah. It's hardly a metropolis -- and not even a town.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | October 23, 2004
BREAK FREE of the Baltimore Beltway, slide onto the very beginning of westbound Interstate 70, and in a mile or so there it is on the left, on the median strip, that new highway sign, big and bright and proclaiming an American continent of possibilities. The 10-foot-by-22-foot sign, installed by the state last July, flatly announces: "Columbus 420 miles St. Louis 845 miles Denver 1700 miles Cove Fort 2200 miles" That's Cove Fort, Utah. It's hardly a metropolis -- and not even a town.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1997
BOULDER, Utah -- In this wild blue yonder, rock canyons rise like steeples and vistas stretch for 60 miles. Western bluebirds flit across a cloudless sky. And junipers have deep roots in the sand.But conflict has intruded upon this landscape. A graffito painted across a bridge delivers a message: Keep it like it was.This sentiment echoes through the towns around the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.When President Clinton declared these 1.7 million acres a monument last fall, he set off a divisive land war that people in these parts compare hyperbolically to the Middle East.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 11, 1994
With conference play half concluded and just 30 shopping days to go before the real fun -- the NCAA tournament -- starts, it's high time to take an early glance at how the field is shaping up.So far, on the men's side, North Carolina appears to be a lock for a No. 1 seed. Duke and Arkansas are prime contenders for top berths, but neither will have an easy time in their remaining conference games and tournaments, and could slip, but not below a No. 2 seed.The fourth No. 1 seed could come from a field of four -- Kansas, Kentucky, UCLA, for regional reasons only, and always underrated Louisville.
FEATURES
By Dan Coyle and Dan Coyle,Universal Press Syndicate | July 26, 1992
Ever since that bully morning back in 1908 when President Teddy Roosevelt leapt on the back of a horse, galloped to the rim of Arizona's Grand Canyon, and deemed it "the most impressive piece of scenery I have ever looked at," Americans have been devising ways in which to observe and fully appreciate the Southwest's magnificent ditches. These days, you can fly over canyons in balloons, buzz them in small prop planes, float through them in rafts, or hop in a car and join the long summer lines of rubberneckers who drive through and around them.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992
BaseballBaltimore Orioles -- Signed 2B Bill Ripken (.217, 14 RBI) to a one-year, $685,000 contract.Chicago White Sox -- Won their arbitration case with P Jack McDowell (17-10, 3.41 ERA, 191 strikeouts) when an arbitrator picked the team's offer of $1.6 million rather than the pitcher's request of $2.3 million. McDowell made $175,000 in 1991.Cincinnati Reds -- Agreed to terms with IF Bip Roberts (.281, 3 HRs, 32 RBI) on a one-year contract for $1.5 million.Kansas City Royals -- Agreed to terms with IF Gregg Jefferies on a one-year contract for $1.15 million.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | October 4, 2012
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS F1 Japanese Grand Prix, Practice SPEED1 a.m. MLB Philadelphia@Washington (T) MASN9 a.m. Orioles@Tampa Bay (T) MASN12:30 WNBA Western Conf. Final: L.A.@Minn., Gm. 1 ESPN28 Boxing G. Rosado vs. C. Whittaker (T) NBCSP7 C. foot. Georgia State@William & Mary (T) CSN11 a.m. Arkansas St.@Florida International ESPNU7:30 East Carolina@Central Florida CBSSN8 East Stroudsburg@Clarion (T)
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1997
BOULDER, Utah -- In this wild blue yonder, rock canyons rise like steeples and vistas stretch for 60 miles. Western bluebirds flit across a cloudless sky. And junipers have deep roots in the sand.But conflict has intruded upon this landscape. A graffito painted across a bridge delivers a message: Keep it like it was.This sentiment echoes through the towns around the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.When President Clinton declared these 1.7 million acres a monument last fall, he set off a divisive land war that people in these parts compare hyperbolically to the Middle East.
NEWS
October 3, 1996
Utah citizens back wilderness protectionGiven The Sun's admirable editorial record in support of environmental protection and wild land preservation, it was unfortunate to see you (''Clinton's monumental decision,'' Sept. 20.) fall for some of the bogus arguments opponents used to criticize President Clinton's decision to create the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah's incomparable redrock region.You appear to agree with the contention that ''locking away 62 billion tons of low-sulfur coal, preferred by power plants as less polluting, may be a greater loss to the environment.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 11, 1994
With conference play half concluded and just 30 shopping days to go before the real fun -- the NCAA tournament -- starts, it's high time to take an early glance at how the field is shaping up.So far, on the men's side, North Carolina appears to be a lock for a No. 1 seed. Duke and Arkansas are prime contenders for top berths, but neither will have an easy time in their remaining conference games and tournaments, and could slip, but not below a No. 2 seed.The fourth No. 1 seed could come from a field of four -- Kansas, Kentucky, UCLA, for regional reasons only, and always underrated Louisville.
FEATURES
By Dan Coyle and Dan Coyle,Universal Press Syndicate | July 26, 1992
Ever since that bully morning back in 1908 when President Teddy Roosevelt leapt on the back of a horse, galloped to the rim of Arizona's Grand Canyon, and deemed it "the most impressive piece of scenery I have ever looked at," Americans have been devising ways in which to observe and fully appreciate the Southwest's magnificent ditches. These days, you can fly over canyons in balloons, buzz them in small prop planes, float through them in rafts, or hop in a car and join the long summer lines of rubberneckers who drive through and around them.
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