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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 17, 1998
READ 'EM and weep, the saying among poker players goes. In poker, the weeping is fake and comic.Read it and weep. In this case, the weeping should be literal. But read Gil Lewthwaite's story in today's paper on the impending famine in Sudan and, if you can't weep, at least feel some empathy for the people of southern Sudan.Lewthwaite and I were in Sudan two years ago, buying the freedom of two slaves and doing an article on how slavery still exists in that country. In addition to buying the freedom of Garang Deng Kuot and his brother, Akok Deng Kuot, and reuniting both boys with their father, we talked to several other people who said they had been kidnapped and forced into slavery but escaped.
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SPORTS
By McClatchy Newspapers | January 21, 2011
The good began with a tragedy. The happy story has an awful beginning, the hero's vision turning to reality only after his death. This is probably the only way it would ever happen. Six months ago, a freakishly tall saint who made his home in Olathe, Kan., passed away from a mess of a disease contracted while saving lives. You might remember Manute Bol as the 7-foot-7 shot blocker in the NBA, designated by the Guinness Book of World Records as one of the tallest men in history, but there is so much more to his remarkable life.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 15, 2004
OMDURMAN ES SALAAM, Sudan - Peter Maeike's house is a patchwork of sugar sacks, plastic sheeting and cardboard stretched over a pole frame, so fragile that a strong breeze might lift it into the air. It would not look out of place in Sudan's western Darfur region, where a government-backed campaign against black African tribes has left up to 50,000 people dead and driven 1.5 million civilians out of their homes and into sprawling relief camps in search...
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2005
JUBA, Sudan - John Garang, the rebel-turned-peacemaker who led southern Sudan in a 21-year civil war, was laid to rest here yesterday amid an outpouring of grief but without the deadly violence that had rocked the African nation earlier in the week. Garang was killed July 30 in a helicopter crash in the mountains of southern Sudan, less than a month after being inaugurated as Sudan's first vice president. In subsequent days, at least 130 people were killed in rioting fueled by suspicions that he had been a victim of foul play.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1993
THIET, Sudan -- They are always there. They wait, watching, patient. Every now and again they soar from the treetops in lazy flight, as an owner might amble about to inspect his property.They will get their fill, the vultures of southern Sudan. Death is the only ample harvest in this land. The weak ones -- animal or human -- fall in the dirt, and there is often no extra strength to cover them.The giant birds may seem to smile as the world turns away. No one wants to hear of more people starving in Africa.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 18, 1992
NAIROBI, Kenya -- As concern grows about the plight of civilians cut off from food and medicine in war-ravaged southern Sudan, a senior United Nations official said yesterday that he had won agreement from both sides in the civil war for relief flights to 20 places in the region.Jan Eliasson said that government officials and rebel representatives had promised not to interfere with flights of food, medicine and other relief supplies into 9 rebel-held towns and 11 government-held towns, including the regional centers of Malakal and Wau.But Mr. Eliasson made it clear that he had not been able to obtain safe passage for flights into Juba, the largest city in the south, which is held by the government but under siege from a faction of the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | July 12, 2005
LAST SATURDAY, a momentous event occurred in Sudan, the largest country in Africa and a land whose people have been beset by conflict and poverty since Great Britain and Egypt gave them independence almost a half-century ago. In a ceremony in Khartoum, John Garang, the leader of the main rebel force in southern Sudan's latest 21-year uprising against the Arab-Islamic government of the north, was installed as vice president. At the same time, the keys to most of the garrisons in southern Sudan were turned over to Mr. Garang's Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
"WHERE IS THE PROOF?" asked Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam in response to accusations that he had cozied up to a government that tolerated the enslavement of black people. "If slavery exists, why don't you go as a member of the press, and you look inside Sudan, and if you find it, then you come back and tell the American people what you found?"The proof was evident to two Baltimore Sun reporters who took up Mr. Farrakhan's challenge, trekked into southern Sudan and purchased the freedom of two Dinka boys.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
More than 300 slaves were returned to their families in southern Sudan last month after their freedom was purchased with money raised by a Canadian television evangelical show and other groups, a co-host of the Canadian show said yesterday.Cal Bombay, vice president of Crossroads Christian Communications Inc. (CCCI), said that on March 12, he witnessed the freeing of the 319 slaves in southern Sudan -- including 200 whose freedom was purchased with funds raised by his show.Some of the women slaves said they had been forcibly circumcised, said Bombay, who flew with his cameraman into southern Sudan on March 12 and filmed the release of the slaves who had been returned to the village of Manyiel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | June 12, 2005
Acts of Faith By Philip Caputo. Alfred A. Knopf. 669 pages. $26.95. In the prologue to Philip Caputo's sprawling, harrowing novel, Acts of Faith, one of the characters, speaking to a newcomer to the continent, refers cryptically to "the synonymousness of God and the Devil in Africa." Distinctions, like idealism, disappear in Caputo's own misery-strewn Heart of Darkness. Characters who begin as one sort of person morph into something else entirely, rationalizing transformations they would once have considered appalling.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | July 12, 2005
LAST SATURDAY, a momentous event occurred in Sudan, the largest country in Africa and a land whose people have been beset by conflict and poverty since Great Britain and Egypt gave them independence almost a half-century ago. In a ceremony in Khartoum, John Garang, the leader of the main rebel force in southern Sudan's latest 21-year uprising against the Arab-Islamic government of the north, was installed as vice president. At the same time, the keys to most of the garrisons in southern Sudan were turned over to Mr. Garang's Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | July 7, 2005
KITGUM, Uganda - Sunday Lalam, a 16-year-old girl, was a forced accomplice and a victim in a cruel conflict that's been waged for 19 years in northern Uganda and southern Sudan. Ms. Lalam was abducted Aug. 4, 2000, by a Ugandan rebel group known as the Lord's Resistance Army when she was 11. During nearly five years of brutal captivity, she lived under constant threat of death and endured numerous beatings. On pain of her own death, she said, she killed many people, so many she does not know the exact number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | June 12, 2005
Acts of Faith By Philip Caputo. Alfred A. Knopf. 669 pages. $26.95. In the prologue to Philip Caputo's sprawling, harrowing novel, Acts of Faith, one of the characters, speaking to a newcomer to the continent, refers cryptically to "the synonymousness of God and the Devil in Africa." Distinctions, like idealism, disappear in Caputo's own misery-strewn Heart of Darkness. Characters who begin as one sort of person morph into something else entirely, rationalizing transformations they would once have considered appalling.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 15, 2004
OMDURMAN ES SALAAM, Sudan - Peter Maeike's house is a patchwork of sugar sacks, plastic sheeting and cardboard stretched over a pole frame, so fragile that a strong breeze might lift it into the air. It would not look out of place in Sudan's western Darfur region, where a government-backed campaign against black African tribes has left up to 50,000 people dead and driven 1.5 million civilians out of their homes and into sprawling relief camps in search...
NEWS
By Eric Reeves | April 1, 2004
ANOTHER AFRICAN genocide is gathering pace in the far western Darfur region of Sudan just as the grim 10th anniversary of the slaying of perhaps 800,000 people in Rwanda is being commemorated. The United States, the United Nations and the rest of the international community failed to halt the slaughter by Hutu militants of Tutsis and politically moderate Hutus in Rwanda in April 1994. It was an unforgivable moral failure. And yet a lesson has not been learned. Despite the current vast civilian destruction in Darfur that is directed against African tribal groups of the region, the world is unprepared to intervene.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
Madut Agau and Adaw Makeir have lived in the United States for only five months, but the Sudanese refugees already have much to be grateful for on their first Thanksgiving. If they made a list, it would include simple pleasures they probably have in common with other Westminster residents: Makeir appreciates her electric baseboard heaters, which will keep them comfortable during a colder winter than they're used to. But ranked higher on that list would be good friends from Westminster Church of the Brethren, which adopted them; the education they provide to their four young children; and the safety they enjoy.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- At least 1.9 million civilians in Sudan's predominantly black African south have died in a 15-year ethnic and religious war that has become the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the U.S. Committee for Refugees reported yesterday."
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2005
JUBA, Sudan - John Garang, the rebel-turned-peacemaker who led southern Sudan in a 21-year civil war, was laid to rest here yesterday amid an outpouring of grief but without the deadly violence that had rocked the African nation earlier in the week. Garang was killed July 30 in a helicopter crash in the mountains of southern Sudan, less than a month after being inaugurated as Sudan's first vice president. In subsequent days, at least 130 people were killed in rioting fueled by suspicions that he had been a victim of foul play.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 18, 2002
JERUSALEM - Two Palestinian suicide bombers standing 20 yards apart blew themselves up last night in an immigrant neighborhood of Tel Aviv, killing three civilians and wounding more than 40 people in the second deadly attack in two days. The twin blasts occurred seconds apart outside an all-night convenience store shortly after 10 p.m., in the heart of a shabby section south of downtown Tel Aviv, where the old central bus station used to be. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility for the attack, which came a day after Palestinian gunmen raked a bus with gunfire in the northern West Bank, killing eight Israelis on their way to the religious settlement of Emmanuel.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 11, 2001
SO THERE I WAS, sitting in Howard University's Blackburn Center about a week before America's Independence Day celebration. The occasion was a debate on the subject "Does slavery exist in the Sudan?" Muslim after Muslim filed into the meeting hall, which was soon packed. I glanced out the window and still more came up the walk. I soon felt a disturbing George Armstrong Custer feeling come over me. The debate had six panelists -- three of whom believe slavery exists in Sudan and three who are living in denial -- who each delivered a five-minute statement.
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