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NEWS
By Jim Fain | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- IT'S ALL but official now that Republicans will go after working-class white votes next year with what amounts to a racist pitch.The issue will be drawn over the civil rights bill of 1991, a measure to restore protections against discrimination in hiring that the Supreme Court threw out in 1989. President Bush's public relations machine has successfully tarred this innocuous proposal as a "quota bill" and will use it to exploit white fears of reverse discrimination.So what's new?
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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | December 19, 2007
In the 40 years between 1966 and 2006, the Republican Party rose from a marginalized minority party into a national governing majority. Though the GOP made significant gains among white Catholics, suburban women and other slivers of the population, it was the conversion of white Southerners and the somewhat-overlapping mobilization of evangelicals that propelled what Karl Rove has called the Republicans' "rolling realignment." For most of the past four decades, however, national Republicans enjoyed the electoral benefits of their Southern, evangelized base without paying much of a political price.
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NEWS
By Jack Bass | January 23, 1991
THREE seemingly unconnected events may push the Bush administration into significant policy changes on civil rights and signal an end to the Republican "Southern strategy" that began three decades ago.In 1961 Sen. Barry Goldwater first articulated this policy when he told Southern Republican leaders in Atlanta, "We're not going to get the Negro vote as a bloc in 1964 or 1968, so we ought to go hunting where the ducks are."He then spelled it out. "I would not like to see my party assume it is the role of the federal government to enforce integration in the schools."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Woody Allen once said something about how 80 percent of life is just showing up. At the time, I had no idea of what the heck he was driving at. The world of politics has helped me to understand. A good example of Mr. Allen's wisdom is offered by Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman's speech to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's convention in Milwaukee last week. That he showed up gave prominent voices from both political extremes something to hate.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 6, 1996
Soccer Moms, 1; Angry White Males, 0.At least we won't have to hear about the Southern Strategy for a while.The breakup of the Republican Party will now be predicted by the very experts who, it seems like only yesterday, foresaw the inevitable end of the Democratic Party.If this were a real democracy, we would get to vote for Orioles play-by-play announcer.Pub Date: 11/06/96
NEWS
October 22, 1991
An embarrassed White House chief of staff was at pains yesterday to read David Duke, erstwhile Ku Klux Klan grand wizard and Nazi sympathizer, out of the Republican Party. He is not a Republican, said John Sununu, and the White House will give him no support in his campaign against a twice-indicted (but twice-acquitted) Democrat in the November election.But Sununu's statements aside, Duke is in fact the denouement of Republican policy dating back for 23 years. The rise of Duke, or someone like him, began in 1968 when Richard Nixon fashioned the "Southern strategy" to offset the influence of George Wallace, who at that time was the embarrassment to Democrats that David Duke is today to the Republicans.
NEWS
October 24, 1990
There's a lot of history behind President Bush's veto this week of the Civil Rights Act of 1990, but it is not a pretty chapter. It goes back more than 25 years, to the time when Alabama's segregationist governor, George Wallace, first ran for president exclusively on opposition to the Civil Rights bill of 1964; the Republican Party's presidential nominee, Barry Goldwater, blew Wallace out of the race by announcing that he opposed the civil rights bill...
NEWS
July 13, 1996
THE FINAL report of the Republican National Committee on Minority and Ethnic Participation was presented Jan. 22, 1988, amid all the ballyhoo, pomp and circumstance one might expect of a long-awaited document that was supposed to dramatically alter the party's complexion. It wasn't worth the paper it was printed on. Republicans continue to pay lip service to wanting more minorities as members, and have made some gains in that regard, but the party is loath to abandon its successful "Southern strategy" based on the appeasement of white men.That being so, it has been surprising to some African Americans to see Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole so eager to ** hook former Joint Chiefs Chairman Colin Powell as his running mate.
TOPIC
By Richard Tafel | March 7, 1999
A STRATEGIC shift the Republican Party made nearly 30 years ago has helped to slowly poison its image before the American people, and it might be the Achilles' heel that brings it down in 2000.In 1972, the core of President Richard Nixon's re-election campaign was not break-ins and wire-tapping but rather the "Southern strategy," or, as the Nixon team called it, "positive polarization." It was about winning over the South by pitting a singled-out minority, such as blacks, against a fearful majority, such as angry Southern whites.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 9, 1994
In HIS new book,"Standing Firm,"Dan Quayle writes of l988, when he was being criticized within and without the Bush-Quayle camp, that he was so miserable" he asked his wife Marilyn, Should I quit?" She replied, You have to stay,and you have to fight!"That sounded familiar to this presidential trivia junkie. Sure enough, in his memoir "RN", Richard Nixon recounts how he was ready to get off the 1952 ticket when insiders and outsiders were pressuring him to. He said to his wife Pat, "Maybe I ought to resign.
NEWS
January 9, 2003
WHEN TRENT LOTT took a pratfall over the little matter of America's segregationist past, one welcome result seemed to be the end of the White House effort to name U.S. District Judge Charles W. Pickering to a federal appellate court. Judge Pickering, of Hattiesburg, Miss., had already been rejected once by the Senate Judiciary Committee for what looked like a mighty peculiar intervention a few years ago on behalf of a cross-burner, and for a paper he wrote as a young man urging a firming-up of his state's anti-miscegenation laws.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - It's a bit ironic that after all these years, Sen. Strom Thurmond's 100th birthday party should become the vehicle for reminding us how the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s changed America, infinitely for the better. Thanks to the insensitivity at best of Senate Republican leader Trent Lott in his remarks at that birthday celebration for the old South Carolina Dixiecrat, the country is revisiting those remarkable days when courageous black and white students and others forced the South to face its social ills of racial segregation and discrimination.
TOPIC
By Richard Tafel | March 7, 1999
A STRATEGIC shift the Republican Party made nearly 30 years ago has helped to slowly poison its image before the American people, and it might be the Achilles' heel that brings it down in 2000.In 1972, the core of President Richard Nixon's re-election campaign was not break-ins and wire-tapping but rather the "Southern strategy," or, as the Nixon team called it, "positive polarization." It was about winning over the South by pitting a singled-out minority, such as blacks, against a fearful majority, such as angry Southern whites.
NEWS
January 21, 1997
CHALK UP a crucial victory for Norfolk Southern in its fight with CSX over East Coast rail dominance. On Friday, stockholders of Conrail rejected a recommended merger with CSX, a vote that showed strong enthusiasm for an alternative, higher offer from Norfolk Southern.The rejection indicated near-unanimous hostility by institutional investors to the CSX-Conrail merger plan. They were especially infuriated by the arrogance of the two companies' leaders, who made it clear that they would continue to try to ram this deal through, although Norfolk Southern is offering a far better financial package.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 6, 1996
Soccer Moms, 1; Angry White Males, 0.At least we won't have to hear about the Southern Strategy for a while.The breakup of the Republican Party will now be predicted by the very experts who, it seems like only yesterday, foresaw the inevitable end of the Democratic Party.If this were a real democracy, we would get to vote for Orioles play-by-play announcer.Pub Date: 11/06/96
NEWS
July 13, 1996
THE FINAL report of the Republican National Committee on Minority and Ethnic Participation was presented Jan. 22, 1988, amid all the ballyhoo, pomp and circumstance one might expect of a long-awaited document that was supposed to dramatically alter the party's complexion. It wasn't worth the paper it was printed on. Republicans continue to pay lip service to wanting more minorities as members, and have made some gains in that regard, but the party is loath to abandon its successful "Southern strategy" based on the appeasement of white men.That being so, it has been surprising to some African Americans to see Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole so eager to ** hook former Joint Chiefs Chairman Colin Powell as his running mate.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
President Bush's attack on the civil rights bill now being debated in Congress has degenerated into an ugly and demagogic spectacle. The president is using platforms which should be left out of politics altogether -- the U.S. Military Academy and an FBI graduation ceremony, two name two recent locations of Bush speeches on civil rights. Moreover, he is using racially loaded code words -- like "quotas" and "blocks" of voters.Go back 27 years, to 1964, and you could hear speeches by George Wallace making the very same attacks on what is now XTC the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 9, 1994
In HIS new book,"Standing Firm,"Dan Quayle writes of l988, when he was being criticized within and without the Bush-Quayle camp, that he was so miserable" he asked his wife Marilyn, Should I quit?" She replied, You have to stay,and you have to fight!"That sounded familiar to this presidential trivia junkie. Sure enough, in his memoir "RN", Richard Nixon recounts how he was ready to get off the 1952 ticket when insiders and outsiders were pressuring him to. He said to his wife Pat, "Maybe I ought to resign.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | May 2, 1994
MARIETTA, Ga. -- Southern Republicans seeking to improve the party's standing were urged during the weekend to press traditional GOP positions -- strength abroad, low taxes and conservative values -- but also to undertake a new, concerted effort to win black voters.In Southern states such as Georgia, where blacks make up 30 percent of the electorate, "the numbers are bleak for us if we write off this black vote," Atlanta-based pollster Whit Ayres told the Southern Republican Leadership Conference.
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