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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 21, 2008
Danielia Cotton knows she's not the first "black girl to rock out." There's a shortchanged lineage before her that includes Joan Armatrading, Nona Hendryx and a former chitlin circuit darling by the name of Tina Turner. But years after the groundbreaking work of those powerhouses, Cotton still finds that people are shocked to see a black woman singing rock music. "If you're not doing R&B, you're not black enough," says the singer-songwriter-musician, who headlines the Recher Theatre in Towson tomorrow night.
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By Mike Giuliano | July 13, 2012
When an aging rock star holds a drink more often than he picks up his guitar, he's clearly suffering from a career hangover in Mark Scharf's "Hired Gun. " Although this Baltimore Playwrights Festival entry tends to be as thematically loud as that hard-drinking rocker, the play skillfully develops the escalating tension between the veteran star and a young session musician hired to perform on an intended comeback album. This Theatrical Mining Company production directed by Stacey Bonds keeps a pretty tight focus on that precarious professional relationship.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | March 16, 2006
Lee Roy Parnell Lee Roy Parnell is heading to Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St. in Annapolis, to promote his new album Back to the Well, a mix of blues, Southern rock and soul. The show is Monday at 8 p.m. and tickets are $26. Call 410-268-4545 or visit ramshead tavern.com for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 21, 2008
Danielia Cotton knows she's not the first "black girl to rock out." There's a shortchanged lineage before her that includes Joan Armatrading, Nona Hendryx and a former chitlin circuit darling by the name of Tina Turner. But years after the groundbreaking work of those powerhouses, Cotton still finds that people are shocked to see a black woman singing rock music. "If you're not doing R&B, you're not black enough," says the singer-songwriter-musician, who headlines the Recher Theatre in Towson tomorrow night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2005
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Southern rockers Johnny and Donnie Van Zant figure they have as much right as anybody to cut a country album. Their father was a truck driver who played Merle Haggard and George Jones around the house. Their late brother, Ronnie, led the rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd, whose Southern imagery and rootsy sound were influential in country as well as rock. And fans of the brothers' respective bands -- the revamped Skynyrd in Johnny's case and .38 Special in Donnie's -- are more likely to blast Gretchen Wilson and Tim McGraw from their pickups than 50 Cent and Britney Spears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 18, 1994
Zakk Wylde has a hard time understanding why people would consider his trio, Pride & Glory, a Southern rock act. "I'm not from the South, you know what I mean?" he says, with perfect New Jersey diction. "People go, 'Oh, yeah. It's Southern rock.' But I don't get the Southern rock thing."He'll admit that his influences as a singer include Ray Charles, Lynyrd Skynyrd's Ronnie Van Zant, and Gregg Allman, and even grant that the banjo picking he does on his band's first single, "Losin' My Mind," could be construed as a nod toward Dixie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | March 27, 1997
Collective SoulDisciplined Breakdown (Atlantic 82984)As the success of R.E.M. and other bands has shown, alternative rock definitely has a place in the South. But does Southern rock have a place in alternative music? Until recently, it would have been hard to answer in the affirmative, since recent boogie-oriented bands have all been written off as '70s-rock recidivists (for example, the Georgia Satellites, the Black Crowes, et al.). But with "Disciplined Breakdown," Collective Soul makes a strong case for the view that modern rock has plenty of room for boogie licks -- provided you know where to put them.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 13, 2012
When an aging rock star holds a drink more often than he picks up his guitar, he's clearly suffering from a career hangover in Mark Scharf's "Hired Gun. " Although this Baltimore Playwrights Festival entry tends to be as thematically loud as that hard-drinking rocker, the play skillfully develops the escalating tension between the veteran star and a young session musician hired to perform on an intended comeback album. This Theatrical Mining Company production directed by Stacey Bonds keeps a pretty tight focus on that precarious professional relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | March 16, 2006
Lee Roy Parnell Lee Roy Parnell is heading to Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St. in Annapolis, to promote his new album Back to the Well, a mix of blues, Southern rock and soul. The show is Monday at 8 p.m. and tickets are $26. Call 410-268-4545 or visit ramshead tavern.com for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2005
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Southern rockers Johnny and Donnie Van Zant figure they have as much right as anybody to cut a country album. Their father was a truck driver who played Merle Haggard and George Jones around the house. Their late brother, Ronnie, led the rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd, whose Southern imagery and rootsy sound were influential in country as well as rock. And fans of the brothers' respective bands -- the revamped Skynyrd in Johnny's case and .38 Special in Donnie's -- are more likely to blast Gretchen Wilson and Tim McGraw from their pickups than 50 Cent and Britney Spears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 19, 1999
Ed Roland doesn't have much patience for people who only look before they leap to conclusions about Collective Soul.Because his band hails from Stockbridge, Ga., and boasts not one, not two, but three guitar players, many people in the music press have therefore deduced that Collective Soul is a Southern rock band. Therefore, the music Collective Soul plays is very much in the mold of such multi-guitar outfits as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Allman Brothers Band.Guess again, says Roland."I think a lot of those people weren't listening to the records," says the singer and guitarist, over the phone from a tour stop in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | March 27, 1997
Collective SoulDisciplined Breakdown (Atlantic 82984)As the success of R.E.M. and other bands has shown, alternative rock definitely has a place in the South. But does Southern rock have a place in alternative music? Until recently, it would have been hard to answer in the affirmative, since recent boogie-oriented bands have all been written off as '70s-rock recidivists (for example, the Georgia Satellites, the Black Crowes, et al.). But with "Disciplined Breakdown," Collective Soul makes a strong case for the view that modern rock has plenty of room for boogie licks -- provided you know where to put them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 18, 1994
Zakk Wylde has a hard time understanding why people would consider his trio, Pride & Glory, a Southern rock act. "I'm not from the South, you know what I mean?" he says, with perfect New Jersey diction. "People go, 'Oh, yeah. It's Southern rock.' But I don't get the Southern rock thing."He'll admit that his influences as a singer include Ray Charles, Lynyrd Skynyrd's Ronnie Van Zant, and Gregg Allman, and even grant that the banjo picking he does on his band's first single, "Losin' My Mind," could be construed as a nod toward Dixie.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 19, 1999
Ed Roland doesn't have much patience for people who only look before they leap to conclusions about Collective Soul.Because his band hails from Stockbridge, Ga., and boasts not one, not two, but three guitar players, many people in the music press have therefore deduced that Collective Soul is a Southern rock band. Therefore, the music Collective Soul plays is very much in the mold of such multi-guitar outfits as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Allman Brothers Band.Guess again, says Roland."I think a lot of those people weren't listening to the records," says the singer and guitarist, over the phone from a tour stop in New York City.
NEWS
February 11, 1995
Billy Jones, 45, an original member of the 1970s country-rock group the Outlaws, died Tuesday in Spring Hill, Fla. The cause of death was not known. He joined the Outlaws in 1972 as a co-guitarist with Hugh Thomasson and Henry Paul. The band was one of the premier Southern rock acts of the 1970s, scoring hits with "There Goes Another Love Song."Ralph Kirstein Heyman, 86, a former president and chief executive of the Consolidated Cork Corp., a manufacturer of bottle caps and can manufacturing equipment, died Monday of a stroke at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y. Consolidated Cork, was based in Piscataway, N.J.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
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