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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1997
Early last week, members of the 12-man crew aboard Chessie reported they had been wearing shorts and sunglasses as the Maryland entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race headed south into that area of the world sailors call the Southern Ocean.The Southern Ocean is the band of open sea that girdles the globe between the southern hemisphere continents and Antarctica. It is, for the most part, cold, windswept and removed from the sea lanes traveled by commercial ships able to speed from Cape Town, South Africa, to ports in Australia, New Zealand and the Far East regardless of wind strengths and weather conditions.
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By Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
After a near disaster on Leg 4 of the Volvo Ocean Race left sailors shaken, officials have decided not to tangle with an iceberg field in the North Atlantic. The race committee may establish a "no-sail zone," and order the eight boats leaving Annapolis for France on Sunday to sail far south of an area known as Iceberg Alley. An International Ice Patrol bulletin yesterday warned that as many as 20 icebergs have been sighted in a region 250 miles off the east coast of Newfoundland, directly in the intended path of the yachts.
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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 4, 1998
SAO SEBASTIAO, Brazil - With Chessie Racing now safely in port, the wives and girlfriends of the 12-man crew are breathing a big, collective sigh of relief that the raging Southern Ocean is history for this Whitbread Round the World race."
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By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | October 19, 2000
Twelve identical 72-foot, steel-hulled yachts are slicing through the western Atlantic today en route to Buenos Aires from Boston on the second leg of a wrong-way round-the-world race. The east-west circumnavigation follows a course against the prevailing winds and currents, giving this race, the BT Global Challenge, its claim to being the world's toughest ocean race. But the deliberately adverse conditions aren't all that make it unique. The $1.1 million yachts are crewed by amateurs, each of whom paid $40,000 for the chance to sail round the world.
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By BRUCE STANNARD and BRUCE STANNARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1997
FREMANTLE, Australia - Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race, rolled into Fremantle on the back of a black rain squall just after dawn this morning, ending an exhilarating, exhausting 18-day passage across the treacherous Southern Ocean from Cape Town, South AfricaFive other Whitbread boats were already snug in the tranquillity of Fremantle Harbor as Chessie stormed across the line under a big blue and white spinnaker....
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By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
EF Language crossed the finish line for Leg 5 of the Whitbread Round the World Race Monday night, but the leg was won more than a week ago when the Swedish entry blasted around Cape Horn and built a 500-nautical-mile lead on the rest of the fleet."
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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 12, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- The hard sailing in the Southern Ocean will test all the sailors in the Whitbread Round the World Race, but none more so than the all-woman crew aboard the Swedish boat EF Education.With less upper-body strength than the men, they will have to cope with the same sort of heavy-weight sail changes in gale force winds and mountainous seas. They will have to wake up extra hands more often to help get the sails up and down. They will have to anticipate turns earlier than the male crews to keep control of a 64-foot boat built for sheer speed.
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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 28, 1998
Running before the wind, cascading down one steep wave, then careening into the back of the next before flying over its crest, is what attracts most sailors to the Whitbread Round the World Race.It is not a typical sailing experience.Leg 5, which begins Sunday in Auckland, New Zealand, is 6,670-nautical-mile passage to Sao Sebastiao, Brazil, and it offers even more.Winds of 40 to 50 knots and gusting higher. Wave heights of 30 feet. Boat speeds exceeding 30 knots. Snow squalls, icebergs and water-swept decks.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
Swedish Match continues to hold the lead in the Whitbread Round the World Race, and race headquarters has predicted a Monday arrival in Fremantle, Australia."
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By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - It's what the Whitbread Round the World Race is all about - the Southern Ocean, one of the wildest, coldest, most dangerous stretches of water on earth.With just days to go to the restart of the race on Saturday, an air of anticipation has settled over the yacht basin here where the boats - and their crews - are being readied for the worst that nature can throw at them."Once you have done that, there's not much else," said Jerry Kirby, bowman on Chessie Racing, the Maryland entrant and one of nine lightweight 64-foot racing yachts waiting for the starter's gun at the harbor mouth here.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
Isabelle Autissier, the 42-year-old French sailor who has experienced the absolutes of success and failure during her years of ocean racing, has been rescued from the desolate reaches of the Southern Ocean -- again.In the last solo around-the-world race, named the BOC Challenge, in 1994, Autissier was forced to abandon her boat after it was severely damaged in the Southern Ocean far west of Australia. A complex and expensive rescue operation mounted by the Australian military saved her life.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
Last spring, the Whitbread Round the World Race drew the interest of hundreds of thousands of people during its stopovers in Baltimore and Annapolis and during the restart at the Bay Bridge.Among the more than 100 Whitbread sailors in that impressive fleet of racing yachts and their 12-person crews was a small woman from France who, often as not, prefers to race across oceans alone.These days Isabelle Autissier is competing in another race, the only woman in a fleet of 16 entered in Around Alone, a west-to-east, solo circumnavigation below the great capes of the Southern Hemisphere.
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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Splashing past a handful of spectators and an occasional pelican, Britain's Silk Cut finished Leg 6 of the Whitbread Round the World Race first yesterday, ending a streak of trouble that has hampered the team since the race began last fall.After traveling three-quarters of the way around the globe, this was the first time a competitor in this international race has reached U.S. waters. Sweden's EF Language, the overall race leader, finished second little more than an hour after Silk Cut, followed by the Swedish team Swedish Match.
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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 4, 1998
SAO SEBASTIAO, Brazil - With Chessie Racing now safely in port, the wives and girlfriends of the 12-man crew are breathing a big, collective sigh of relief that the raging Southern Ocean is history for this Whitbread Round the World race."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
EF Language crossed the finish line for Leg 5 of the Whitbread Round the World Race Monday night, but the leg was won more than a week ago when the Swedish entry blasted around Cape Horn and built a 500-nautical-mile lead on the rest of the fleet."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the Whitbread Round the World Race, jumped into the lead as the nine-boat fleet left Auckland, New Zealand, Sunday on the 6,670-nautical-mile Leg 5 and has been in first or second position since.Chessie, which brought back Leg 4 crew member Gavin Brady of Annapolis for Leg 5 as tactician and added Leg 2, Southern Ocean skipper Dee Smith of San Francisco, built an early lead by deftly escaping the wash of an enormous spectator fleet at Auckland and capitalizing on Brady's extensive knowledge of local sailing conditions.
SPORTS
November 25, 1997
Status: Day 17, Leg 2Standings:Boat .. .. .. .. .. .. ..Nautical miles to finish1. Swedish Match .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..0.02. Innovation Kvaerner .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..0.03. Toshiba .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..0.04. Silk Cut .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...25.45. EF Language .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...78.36. Chessie Racing .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..268.57. Merit Cup .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .537.78. EF Education .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .635.09. BrunelSunergy .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...776.
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By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | January 18, 1998
A good disaster story certainly has its appeal. Sitting in a comfy chair in a heated room in the depths of winter while reading of deaths on Everest or drownings far out to sea only adds to the experience: Our proximity to nature's wrath can make us sympathetic to its unwitting victims and critical of the egotists who put themselves in harm's way. Outside magazine has such a story in its January issue. Recounting the rescue last year of three sailors from the Southern Ocean, Craig Vetter spins a hair-raising yarn that bears a remarkable resemblance to Sebastian Junger's "The Perfect Storm" -- except Vetter's sailors were trying to win an around-the-world race, while Junger's fishermen died trying to make a living.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 28, 1998
Running before the wind, cascading down one steep wave, then careening into the back of the next before flying over its crest, is what attracts most sailors to the Whitbread Round the World Race.It is not a typical sailing experience.Leg 5, which begins Sunday in Auckland, New Zealand, is 6,670-nautical-mile passage to Sao Sebastiao, Brazil, and it offers even more.Winds of 40 to 50 knots and gusting higher. Wave heights of 30 feet. Boat speeds exceeding 30 knots. Snow squalls, icebergs and water-swept decks.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | January 18, 1998
A good disaster story certainly has its appeal. Sitting in a comfy chair in a heated room in the depths of winter while reading of deaths on Everest or drownings far out to sea only adds to the experience: Our proximity to nature's wrath can make us sympathetic to its unwitting victims and critical of the egotists who put themselves in harm's way. Outside magazine has such a story in its January issue. Recounting the rescue last year of three sailors from the Southern Ocean, Craig Vetter spins a hair-raising yarn that bears a remarkable resemblance to Sebastian Junger's "The Perfect Storm" -- except Vetter's sailors were trying to win an around-the-world race, while Junger's fishermen died trying to make a living.
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