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NEWS
December 29, 1997
GUNMEN who invaded the village of Acteal in southern Mexico and murdered 45 Tzotzil Indians last Monday, wounded the hopes for democracy and rule of law in Mexico. The reform administration of President Ernesto Zedillo is back to Square One in attempts to restore the credibility of Mexican institutions.There has been corruption of police and the army in fighting narco-terrorism, political murders at the highest level, stolen elections, a currency crisis impoverishing millions and now this.
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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Cerro de las Tablas, Mexico-- --The dance to honor the dead begins in the cemetery, where the souls of the departed are collected and taken into the dirt roads and the concrete homes to celebrate with the living. By village tradition, and Mexican custom, the dance is performed only by men. Girls in rural Mexico are taught to look away when they shake a man's hand, out of respect. They serve their fathers and brothers food and drink without question. When it comes to entertainment, as in life, men take the lead.
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NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1998
POLHO, Mexico -- Two years after the Zapatista rebellion exploded in southern Mexico during the first days of 1994, the municipality of Polho in the Chiapas highlands has essentially seceded from Mexico's federal system of government.Now Polho is ruled by an autonomous municipal council. Disputes are settled under its own legal code by its own judge, whose decisions are enforced by an independent police force -- and none of it is recognized by the Mexican authorities.Made up of 36 villages in the heart of the region that is morally, though not militarily, held by the Zapatistas, Polho represents a working model of what the rebels say they want -- and something the Mexican government is determined not to give them.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 1999
A pot stands on the mantel about which something ought to be said, something positive. But how do you praise a clay pot, if you are moved to praise by its design, its symmetry or color?Could you contrive an ode? The poet John Keats did that to celebrate the ancient Grecian urn that famously fired his imagination. But odes refer to a more declamatory time. The exalted style would not be appropriate to the pot in question.Not that this is a simple pot. Though recently made, its antecedents reside in the pre-Christian era. It has no links to ancient Greece, as Keats' pot did. But this is not to suggest it lacks elegance and grace.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 1999
A pot stands on the mantel about which something ought to be said, something positive. But how do you praise a clay pot, if you are moved to praise by its design, its symmetry or color?Could you contrive an ode? The poet John Keats did that to celebrate the ancient Grecian urn that famously fired his imagination. But odes refer to a more declamatory time. The exalted style would not be appropriate to the pot in question.Not that this is a simple pot. Though recently made, its antecedents reside in the pre-Christian era. It has no links to ancient Greece, as Keats' pot did. But this is not to suggest it lacks elegance and grace.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1999
TLAHUITOLTEPEC, Mexico -- She looks healthy now, laughing among two dozen other children in a rescue center run by Roman Catholic nuns. But when 8-year-old Catarina Hernandez arrived here, her belly was bloated and her legs swollen with water -- the final stage of malnutrition.The condition is so close to starvation that it normally appears only in times of famine, but Sister Alicia Estrada, who runs the center, says the nuns see it routinely. In the lush hills that surround this village in southern Mexico, hunger is day-to-day normality.
NEWS
January 11, 1994
The quixotic Mayan Indian uprising in Chiapas state in southern Mexico was foreshadowed by stories in the Mexico press of guerrillas organizing, but still a surprise. Its essence remains unknown. One or another of historic movements, besides Emiliano Zapata's Indian army, was its model. All have in common that they failed.There have been pure Indian uprisings, unsullied by ideological outsiders, in Canada, the United States, Mexico and further south. The larger society was always more numerous, economically powerful and technologically advanced.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 24, 1994
Paris -- A leader of the New Year's Day rebellion in southern Mexico, who calls himself ''Major Mario,'' gave the following answer to questions about links to the ''Shining Path'' movement in Peru:''I have read Mao Tse-tung, but I am not a Maoist, and our organization is not socialist. We want democracy, elections without frauds, land for the peasants, decent houses, medical care, schools. We want to be treated like human beings -- to eat meat like everyone else. It's as simple as that.''It is difficult to think of a European or Asian revolutionary in the 20th century who would have spoken quite those words.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Cerro de las Tablas, Mexico-- --The dance to honor the dead begins in the cemetery, where the souls of the departed are collected and taken into the dirt roads and the concrete homes to celebrate with the living. By village tradition, and Mexican custom, the dance is performed only by men. Girls in rural Mexico are taught to look away when they shake a man's hand, out of respect. They serve their fathers and brothers food and drink without question. When it comes to entertainment, as in life, men take the lead.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | January 9, 1994
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- In villages on the outskirts of this scenic town high in the mountains of southern Mexico, there are few signs of the peasant rebels masked by red bandannas who stormed in without warning a week ago to do battle with the Mexican army.Army gunships have sent the guerrillas, with their shotguns, wooden rifles and machetes, into hiding. Although anxieties have arisen about assaults elsewhere in the country, including the capital, Mexico City, where a bomb exploded yesterday, government officials have speculated that the guerrillas are gone for good.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1999
TLAHUITOLTEPEC, Mexico -- She looks healthy now, laughing among two dozen other children in a rescue center run by Roman Catholic nuns. But when 8-year-old Catarina Hernandez arrived here, her belly was bloated and her legs swollen with water -- the final stage of malnutrition.The condition is so close to starvation that it normally appears only in times of famine, but Sister Alicia Estrada, who runs the center, says the nuns see it routinely. In the lush hills that surround this village in southern Mexico, hunger is day-to-day normality.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1998
POLHO, Mexico -- Two years after the Zapatista rebellion exploded in southern Mexico during the first days of 1994, the municipality of Polho in the Chiapas highlands has essentially seceded from Mexico's federal system of government.Now Polho is ruled by an autonomous municipal council. Disputes are settled under its own legal code by its own judge, whose decisions are enforced by an independent police force -- and none of it is recognized by the Mexican authorities.Made up of 36 villages in the heart of the region that is morally, though not militarily, held by the Zapatistas, Polho represents a working model of what the rebels say they want -- and something the Mexican government is determined not to give them.
NEWS
December 29, 1997
GUNMEN who invaded the village of Acteal in southern Mexico and murdered 45 Tzotzil Indians last Monday, wounded the hopes for democracy and rule of law in Mexico. The reform administration of President Ernesto Zedillo is back to Square One in attempts to restore the credibility of Mexican institutions.There has been corruption of police and the army in fighting narco-terrorism, political murders at the highest level, stolen elections, a currency crisis impoverishing millions and now this.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 24, 1994
Paris -- A leader of the New Year's Day rebellion in southern Mexico, who calls himself ''Major Mario,'' gave the following answer to questions about links to the ''Shining Path'' movement in Peru:''I have read Mao Tse-tung, but I am not a Maoist, and our organization is not socialist. We want democracy, elections without frauds, land for the peasants, decent houses, medical care, schools. We want to be treated like human beings -- to eat meat like everyone else. It's as simple as that.''It is difficult to think of a European or Asian revolutionary in the 20th century who would have spoken quite those words.
NEWS
January 11, 1994
The quixotic Mayan Indian uprising in Chiapas state in southern Mexico was foreshadowed by stories in the Mexico press of guerrillas organizing, but still a surprise. Its essence remains unknown. One or another of historic movements, besides Emiliano Zapata's Indian army, was its model. All have in common that they failed.There have been pure Indian uprisings, unsullied by ideological outsiders, in Canada, the United States, Mexico and further south. The larger society was always more numerous, economically powerful and technologically advanced.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | January 9, 1994
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- In villages on the outskirts of this scenic town high in the mountains of southern Mexico, there are few signs of the peasant rebels masked by red bandannas who stormed in without warning a week ago to do battle with the Mexican army.Army gunships have sent the guerrillas, with their shotguns, wooden rifles and machetes, into hiding. Although anxieties have arisen about assaults elsewhere in the country, including the capital, Mexico City, where a bomb exploded yesterday, government officials have speculated that the guerrillas are gone for good.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 11, 1990
Great Expeditions is a bimonthly publication that describes trips not often found in the brochures at a travel agent's office.The magazine has tips, such as the autumn issue's advisory that some hotels in Baja California already are booked for the July 11 solar eclipse next year. Destination articles include Benin in Africa, Japan, southern Mexico, Chile, Galapagos Islands and Israel. The magazine is published in Canada, and a six-issue subscription costs $18. For a free sample issue, write Box 8000-411, Sumas, Wash.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2001
Tiny Flyers Short-tailed bats are really small! They are only 2 to 3 inches in length, and that includes their short tail. They are found in Southern Mexico and parts of South America. They generally live about 2-6 years in the wild but can live as long as 12 years in captivity. what's for DINNER? Fruits and insects. do you KNOW? How far do bats fly? Answer: These bats are very active at night and can fly an average of 3 miles a night. WILD FACTS 1. Short-tailed bats have a leaf-shaped nose.
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