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NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
More than three months after a Maryland study ruled out a proposed Chesapeake Bay commuter ferry between the Lower Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland as too expensive, Virginia officials are moving ahead with plans that could provide high-speed service between Crisfield on the Shore and Reedville, Va. Meanwhile, a ferry operator based in Pensacola, Fla., who wants to build the $50 million project without government help, has purchased options on property...
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson and Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Douglas M. Birch and Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | November 7, 1997
CHAPTICO -- The number of people sickened by food poisoning at a Southern Maryland church dinner swelled to 622 yesterday, and public health investigators raised the possibility that a second death may be traced to the salmonella outbreak.St. Mary's County health officials described the second possible victim as an elderly Baltimore woman who died of a heart attack this week after eating dinner Sunday at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in the tiny community of Chaptico.They were uncertain whether her death was caused by a bacterial infection, however.
FEATURES
April 19, 1992
Kilted clansmen will gather at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard on Saturday for the 14th annual Celtic Festival of Southern Maryland. The event, which celebrates the cultural heritage of the Celtic people, provides a day of music, dance, storytelling, athletic competitions and family fun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.Professional and amateur athletes will compete in the Scottish Heptathlon with such events as the hammer throw, caber toss and sheaf toss. There will be clan challenges, junior highland games and Celtic and kilted mile foot races.
FEATURES
April 21, 1991
The 13th annual Celtic Festival and Highland Gathering will be held Saturday at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard.Family fun is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.--clan challenges, a Scottish heptathlon for both professionals and amateurs, the Southern Maryland Highland Dance Competition and piping competitions.There will also be a Celtic market, living history exhibits, demonstrations and food.Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for seniors and children 7 to 12. The park is off Route 2/4 in Southern Maryland.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
An international drug network that allegedly used car batteries to smuggle cocaine and heroin from Latin America into the United States, including to dealers in Southern Maryland, has been dismantled, federal law enforcement authorities said yesterday. The far-flung probe became public yesterday when the federal court in Greenbelt unsealed a grand jury indictment charging 21 men, including nine in Maryland and a dozen in Guatemala, Mexico and the Dominican Republic. The charges include conspiracy to import and distribute illegal drugs and could result in life sentences.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
BUSHWOOD - Bert Dean faces the business decision of his life. Should he continue growing tobacco - something with which the 61- year-old Southern Maryland farmer has been involved since he was 6 years old - or accept a big bucks buyout offer from the state? "It's a tough decision," Dean said recently as he worked in the tobacco-stripping barn preparing this year's leaf crop for auction next spring. "I've been doing this all my life," he added. "It's in my blood. It's my heritage. My father grew tobacco.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Recently married and awarded a medical school scholarship, David M. Atlas Jr. was looking forward to the trip home to Southern Maryland for Christmas with his family.Instead, the 23-year-old Mr. Atlas will be buried there on Christmas Eve. He was shot to death early Tuesday outside a Philadelphia restaurant after a holiday farewell pizza party with friends from the nearby Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine."We're all in a state of shock," his mother, Katherine E. Atlas, said last night from her home in the St. Mary's County community of California.
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