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NEWS
April 20, 2014
For Southern Maryland, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station is an economic engine like no other. It accounts for $6.6 billion in economic activity, including 41,185 jobs, so it's small wonder that elected leaders from that region of the state are extremely protective of it, and that includes House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer. But at what cost? One of the more curious events of the most recent General Assembly session was the passage of legislation that would bar the Maryland Public Service Commission from approving a wind-powered generating facility between now and July 1 of next year within a 56-mile radius of the Navy base.
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NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
BangBang Mongolian Grill is closed in Canton, but one of the partners in the franchise operation plans to reopen the location as an independent restaurant named Soyombo Mongolian Grill . Opened in February 2012 in the Can Company, the Canton location was the first in Maryland for BangBang, a create-your-own-stir-fry restaurant based in West Des Moines, Iowa. A second Maryland location opened in Bowie in March 2012 and remains open but is also converting from a BangBang into a Soyombo.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would prohibit discrimination against transgender people. The Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which passed the Senate, 32-15, now goes to the House of Delegates. The measure would expand Maryland's anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in employment, housing, access to credit and public accommodations. Four localities — Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties — already bar discrimination based on gender identity, but there is not a state law against it. "I think we're ready to move ahead and be progressive," said Sen. Delores G. Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat, who argued that transgender civil rights ought to be protected statewide.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Maryland's MARC commuter trains, which have always operated Monday through Friday, will begin offering weekend service between Baltimore and Washington on the Penn Line in coming months. The expansion - put on hold in 2008 when the recession hit - is possible as the result of the new transportation revenue law that raises the state's gas tax, officials said. The governor signed the bill Thursday. The news was welcomed by Baltimore officials, who said it would offer city residents a less expensive means than Amtrak of traveling to Washington for weekend events while also encouraging D.C. residents to travel to Charm City.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
Rep. John Delaney's commentary ("Natural gas is the right choice for the U.S.," April 2) speaks for the energy and job needs of Canada, Crimea, Europe, Russia, Ukraine the Midwestern United States and southern Maryland. Unmentioned in this geopolitical academic exercise are the energy and job needs of the very Congressional district he represents. I will help the congressman fill in the blanks by citing his distortions and omissions that may help him with his political base but harm everyone else in the district and create a strange sense of emptiness to people interested in growing jobs and the nation's energy needs.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Meteorologists and utility officials cautioned of possible power outages Wednesday night as wind gusts up to 50 mph blow through the region, along with possible thunderstorms and then a burst of cold air. The combination of high winds and saturated soil was expected to down tree limbs and trunks, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials warned. Slightly more than 16,000 BGE customers were without power as of 11 p.m., slightly less than half of them in Baltimore County. The National Weather Service placed Central Maryland under a wind advisory through 11 a.m. Thursday, with sustained winds of 20-30 mph and gusts of 40-50 mph. Wind gusts neared or surpassed 50 mph across the state Wednesday night, including a 53 mph gust at BWI Airport, 51 mph in West Baltimore, 51 mph in Middle River and 46 mph in Westminster.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The Senate moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a prized naval air station in southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River.  Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, the region's economic engine.  They argued a delay was needed to finish a study of whether such projects could operate without interfering with the station's radar.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
By a wide margin, Maryland voters want to raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 a hour, a poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun shows. A majority of voters in every region of the state supports that wage increase, and the proposal has near-unanimous support from African-Americans, according to the poll. Statewide, 69 percent of voters surveyed said they back a proposal now being debated in the General Assembly to increase Maryland's minimum wage from the current federal level of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016.
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