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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
WALDORF, Md. - Even surrounded by fast-food joints, the red neon "WALDORF RESTAURANT" sign looks garish, as if it belongs in another place or time. Which it does. Forty years ago, lights flashed, and bells rang as tourists hit jackpots on the restaurant's oak-paneled slot machines. Tourists slow-danced to big band music in an upstairs room draped in red velvet, and waiters served bacon-wrapped slabs of filet mignon for $3.99. It was an era when slots were omnipresent - and legal - in Southern Maryland.
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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
More than three months after a Maryland study ruled out a proposed Chesapeake Bay commuter ferry between the Lower Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland as too expensive, Virginia officials are moving ahead with plans that could provide high-speed service between Crisfield on the Shore and Reedville, Va. Meanwhile, a ferry operator based in Pensacola, Fla., who wants to build the $50 million project without government help, has purchased options on property...
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1997
At 4 o'clock on the dot on a recent Saturday evening, people were already lined up at the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department in northern Carroll County, waiting to purchase crab cake, shrimp, hot beef and hot turkey platters for supper.In the kitchen, someone was complaining because somebody else hadn't shown up to help, a novice was cautiously manning the deep fryer and the rest of the volunteer staff was trying to memorize prices and portion sizes before it really got busy.Lynne Warner was calm amid the chaos, soothing the complainer from across the room while she stood with one eye on the deep fryer and the other on the grill -- at the same time mentally calculating just how many fried shrimp should come with the shrimp platter and how many would land in the smaller and less expensive shrimp boat.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 5, 1991
Off the bow of the Patuxent II, a whirling auger scrapes years of accumulated muck from the bottom of Rock Creek.Roaring in the stern, the barge's 365-horsepower diesel engines suck up the debris, beginning its two-mile journey to the disposal site off Tar's Cove."
FEATURES
April 19, 1992
Kilted clansmen will gather at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard on Saturday for the 14th annual Celtic Festival of Southern Maryland. The event, which celebrates the cultural heritage of the Celtic people, provides a day of music, dance, storytelling, athletic competitions and family fun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.Professional and amateur athletes will compete in the Scottish Heptathlon with such events as the hammer throw, caber toss and sheaf toss. There will be clan challenges, junior highland games and Celtic and kilted mile foot races.
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