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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Enrique Villa can walk from his condominium on Water Street to his job at St. Paul and Baltimore streets in about five minutes. In Maryland, that's rare. Villa and his wife, Kathryn, a physician whose commute by subway to Johns Hopkins Hospital is nearly as short, say they can't stand spending their spare time in the car. Villa, a 34-year-old architect, used to spend an hour getting to work, but cut it short by moving closer to the office. "We saw our standard of living, just from a personal psychological perspective, improve dramatically," he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday making Maryland one of a handful of states to extend anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people. The transgender rights legislation, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing, was one of scores of bills O'Malley signed during the last scheduled public signing ceremony of his eight years as governor. Other bills he approved will overhaul Maryland's speed camera law to add safeguards for drivers from malfunctioning systems and outlaw "revenge porn" — the posting of intimate pictures on the Internet as a way of getting back at a former spouse or lover.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson and Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Douglas M. Birch and Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | November 7, 1997
CHAPTICO -- The number of people sickened by food poisoning at a Southern Maryland church dinner swelled to 622 yesterday, and public health investigators raised the possibility that a second death may be traced to the salmonella outbreak.St. Mary's County health officials described the second possible victim as an elderly Baltimore woman who died of a heart attack this week after eating dinner Sunday at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in the tiny community of Chaptico.They were uncertain whether her death was caused by a bacterial infection, however.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2000
DARLENE GOATLEY would like to see us all become more knowledgeable about what she calls the "hidden disease" -- multiple sclerosis. "Part of the struggle of MS is trying to describe it to other people," says Goatley, a licensed clinical social worker from Arnold who is a volunteer with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Southern Maryland chapter. "It affects every part of a person's life, and yet, if you look at a person with MS, you might not have any idea there's anything wrong."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
The Goughs, the Mattinglys, the Mudds, the Abells. Their names grace mailboxes, businesses, church rolls and community newspapers throughout Southern Maryland. Nearly 640 miles away, the same names permeate the "Holy Land," a tri-county region in central Kentucky where thousands of Roman Catholic Marylanders from Charles, Prince George's and St. Mary's counties settled after the Revolutionary War. Yesterday, 600 people with those surnames and scores more in common came to Leonardtown from around the country for the National Reunion of Descendants of Maryland to Kentucky, a biennial event held in one state or the other since 1990.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
NEWS
January 6, 1994
THE talk about state troopers and gubernatorial trysts in the life of Bill Clinton sets bells ringing for Marylanders with long memories. We quote from Bradford Jacobs' book, "Thimbleriggers," as he chronicled Marvin Mandel's famous romance with Jeanne Dorsey during his days as speaker of the House and governor of Maryland:"Immediate reports were elementary, credible. A pedestrian had been killed, the governor injured somewhat in an accident on the road leading from Southern Maryland. A state trooper was driving the governor, but he seemed not to blame.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Recently married and awarded a medical school scholarship, David M. Atlas Jr. was looking forward to the trip home to Southern Maryland for Christmas with his family.Instead, the 23-year-old Mr. Atlas will be buried there on Christmas Eve. He was shot to death early Tuesday outside a Philadelphia restaurant after a holiday farewell pizza party with friends from the nearby Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine."We're all in a state of shock," his mother, Katherine E. Atlas, said last night from her home in the St. Mary's County community of California.
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