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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson and Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Douglas M. Birch and Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | November 7, 1997
CHAPTICO -- The number of people sickened by food poisoning at a Southern Maryland church dinner swelled to 622 yesterday, and public health investigators raised the possibility that a second death may be traced to the salmonella outbreak.St. Mary's County health officials described the second possible victim as an elderly Baltimore woman who died of a heart attack this week after eating dinner Sunday at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in the tiny community of Chaptico.They were uncertain whether her death was caused by a bacterial infection, however.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday making Maryland one of a handful of states to extend anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people. The transgender rights legislation, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing, was one of scores of bills O'Malley signed during the last scheduled public signing ceremony of his eight years as governor. Other bills he approved will overhaul Maryland's speed camera law to add safeguards for drivers from malfunctioning systems and outlaw "revenge porn" — the posting of intimate pictures on the Internet as a way of getting back at a former spouse or lover.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Enrique Villa can walk from his condominium on Water Street to his job at St. Paul and Baltimore streets in about five minutes. In Maryland, that's rare. Villa and his wife, Kathryn, a physician whose commute by subway to Johns Hopkins Hospital is nearly as short, say they can't stand spending their spare time in the car. Villa, a 34-year-old architect, used to spend an hour getting to work, but cut it short by moving closer to the office. "We saw our standard of living, just from a personal psychological perspective, improve dramatically," he said.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
WALDORF, Md. - Even surrounded by fast-food joints, the red neon "WALDORF RESTAURANT" sign looks garish, as if it belongs in another place or time. Which it does. Forty years ago, lights flashed, and bells rang as tourists hit jackpots on the restaurant's oak-paneled slot machines. Tourists slow-danced to big band music in an upstairs room draped in red velvet, and waiters served bacon-wrapped slabs of filet mignon for $3.99. It was an era when slots were omnipresent - and legal - in Southern Maryland.
SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Like that of many freshmen at St. Mary's College in Southern Maryland, Ryan Breymaier's dream of becoming a world-class sailor began at the mouth of the Potomac River, near where it empties into the Chesapeake Bay. It is there that the kid from Damascus who came to play lacrosse transformed into a man who dreamed of traversing the world's seas and breaking records. But Breymaier, a 1997 graduate with a degree in economics, paused his whirlwind life - now based in northern France - to return to the school that gave him his career, helping the Offshore Team of St.Mary's students race in this weekend's 40th Governor's Cup aboard the Yellow Jacket.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
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