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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
WALDORF, Md. - Even surrounded by fast-food joints, the red neon "WALDORF RESTAURANT" sign looks garish, as if it belongs in another place or time. Which it does. Forty years ago, lights flashed, and bells rang as tourists hit jackpots on the restaurant's oak-paneled slot machines. Tourists slow-danced to big band music in an upstairs room draped in red velvet, and waiters served bacon-wrapped slabs of filet mignon for $3.99. It was an era when slots were omnipresent - and legal - in Southern Maryland.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
EASTON -- Foresters estimate that up to 40 percent of the trees in a band extending from Southern Maryland across the mid-Eastern Shore incurred "severe damage" during a rare, extended ice storm earlier this month."
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Enrique Villa can walk from his condominium on Water Street to his job at St. Paul and Baltimore streets in about five minutes. In Maryland, that's rare. Villa and his wife, Kathryn, a physician whose commute by subway to Johns Hopkins Hospital is nearly as short, say they can't stand spending their spare time in the car. Villa, a 34-year-old architect, used to spend an hour getting to work, but cut it short by moving closer to the office. "We saw our standard of living, just from a personal psychological perspective, improve dramatically," he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday making Maryland one of a handful of states to extend anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people. The transgender rights legislation, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing, was one of scores of bills O'Malley signed during the last scheduled public signing ceremony of his eight years as governor. Other bills he approved will overhaul Maryland's speed camera law to add safeguards for drivers from malfunctioning systems and outlaw "revenge porn" — the posting of intimate pictures on the Internet as a way of getting back at a former spouse or lover.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
More than three months after a Maryland study ruled out a proposed Chesapeake Bay commuter ferry between the Lower Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland as too expensive, Virginia officials are moving ahead with plans that could provide high-speed service between Crisfield on the Shore and Reedville, Va. Meanwhile, a ferry operator based in Pensacola, Fla., who wants to build the $50 million project without government help, has purchased options on property...
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
For as long as she can remember, Mervin Savoy has pressed the world to see her as she sees herself. She refused to be bowed by the school officials who wouldn't let her write "American Indian" on forms identifying her race. She refused to be halted by governors who said her people's history was too thinly documented. Even a prolonged feud with fellow tribal leader Billy Tayac failed to dissuade her. Last week, at age 68, Savoy let a contented smile flood her face as Gov. Martin O'Malley said the words she had waited so long to hear.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1998
ABERDEEN -- In the 1680s, the frontiersman and tobacco merchants of the northern Chesapeake Bay gathered to trade and socialize at a tiny tobacco port on the Bush River. They called it Baltimore Town, the 17th-century seat of Baltimore County's court.Archaeologists digging gingerly amid unexploded munitions at the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground say they have found traces of that first Baltimore, a town that vanished decades before the 1729 founding of a new Baltimore, 20 miles to the south on the Patapsco River.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
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