Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSouthern Maryland
IN THE NEWS

Southern Maryland

NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
EASTON -- Foresters estimate that up to 40 percent of the trees in a band extending from Southern Maryland across the mid-Eastern Shore incurred "severe damage" during a rare, extended ice storm earlier this month."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
University of Maryland officials on Tuesday announced the launch of a new test site to study how drones may coexist with jets, helicopters and other air traffic in U.S. airspace. The long-planned site is to be based near Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Southern Maryland, long a key research site for the Navy. It will be managed by the A. James Clark School of Engineering at College Park. "With [Pax River] serving as a premier facility for research, development, testing, and evaluation, our region is already a hub for aviation innovation," Rep. Steny Hoyer, whose district includes the university and the test site, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
An international drug network that allegedly used car batteries to smuggle cocaine and heroin from Latin America into the United States, including to dealers in Southern Maryland, has been dismantled, federal law enforcement authorities said yesterday. The far-flung probe became public yesterday when the federal court in Greenbelt unsealed a grand jury indictment charging 21 men, including nine in Maryland and a dozen in Guatemala, Mexico and the Dominican Republic. The charges include conspiracy to import and distribute illegal drugs and could result in life sentences.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
WALDORF, Md. - Even surrounded by fast-food joints, the red neon "WALDORF RESTAURANT" sign looks garish, as if it belongs in another place or time. Which it does. Forty years ago, lights flashed, and bells rang as tourists hit jackpots on the restaurant's oak-paneled slot machines. Tourists slow-danced to big band music in an upstairs room draped in red velvet, and waiters served bacon-wrapped slabs of filet mignon for $3.99. It was an era when slots were omnipresent - and legal - in Southern Maryland.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
HOLLYWOOD -- A wintry sun slants through the old trees of Sotterley Plantation, falls in splintered rays on Agnes Kane Callum's strong, wide face, and casts her shadow against the weathered walls of the last remaining cas from around 1830. When southern Maryland's tobacco culture was at its height in the 18th century, at least 52 slaves worked Sotterley. Perhaps a dozen cabins were squeezed onto a thin strip of otherwise unuseable land between this St. Mary's County plantation's "rolling road" and a ditch-like ravine.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Enrique Villa can walk from his condominium on Water Street to his job at St. Paul and Baltimore streets in about five minutes. In Maryland, that's rare. Villa and his wife, Kathryn, a physician whose commute by subway to Johns Hopkins Hospital is nearly as short, say they can't stand spending their spare time in the car. Villa, a 34-year-old architect, used to spend an hour getting to work, but cut it short by moving closer to the office. "We saw our standard of living, just from a personal psychological perspective, improve dramatically," he said.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.