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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | December 10, 2007
Readers of my last column agreed enthusiastically that Interstate 95 south of Washington takes the crown as the worst traffic nightmare in the Mid-Atlantic states during peak holiday travel. Quite a few of them offered the same alternate route: a pleasant jaunt through Southern Maryland via U.S. 301, crossing into Virginia on the Governor Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge. Among the readers who recommended such a strategy were Ann Heether and Ted Lingelbach of Parkville. "We agree that I-495 and I-95 South in Northern Virginia are a Nightmare," they wrote.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
More than three months after a Maryland study ruled out a proposed Chesapeake Bay commuter ferry between the Lower Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland as too expensive, Virginia officials are moving ahead with plans that could provide high-speed service between Crisfield on the Shore and Reedville, Va. Meanwhile, a ferry operator based in Pensacola, Fla., who wants to build the $50 million project without government help, has purchased options on property...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday making Maryland one of a handful of states to extend anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people. The transgender rights legislation, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing, was one of scores of bills O'Malley signed during the last scheduled public signing ceremony of his eight years as governor. Other bills he approved will overhaul Maryland's speed camera law to add safeguards for drivers from malfunctioning systems and outlaw "revenge porn" — the posting of intimate pictures on the Internet as a way of getting back at a former spouse or lover.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
HOLLYWOOD -- A wintry sun slants through the old trees of Sotterley Plantation, falls in splintered rays on Agnes Kane Callum's strong, wide face, and casts her shadow against the weathered walls of the last remaining cas from around 1830. When southern Maryland's tobacco culture was at its height in the 18th century, at least 52 slaves worked Sotterley. Perhaps a dozen cabins were squeezed onto a thin strip of otherwise unuseable land between this St. Mary's County plantation's "rolling road" and a ditch-like ravine.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 4, 1992
Between 5,000 and 7,000 people in St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's counties claim Piscataway Indian ancestry, according to Mervin A. Savoy, chairwoman of the Piscataway-Conoy Confederacy."
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
An international drug network that allegedly used car batteries to smuggle cocaine and heroin from Latin America into the United States, including to dealers in Southern Maryland, has been dismantled, federal law enforcement authorities said yesterday. The far-flung probe became public yesterday when the federal court in Greenbelt unsealed a grand jury indictment charging 21 men, including nine in Maryland and a dozen in Guatemala, Mexico and the Dominican Republic. The charges include conspiracy to import and distribute illegal drugs and could result in life sentences.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
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