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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
EASTON -- Foresters estimate that up to 40 percent of the trees in a band extending from Southern Maryland across the mid-Eastern Shore incurred "severe damage" during a rare, extended ice storm earlier this month."
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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | December 10, 2007
Readers of my last column agreed enthusiastically that Interstate 95 south of Washington takes the crown as the worst traffic nightmare in the Mid-Atlantic states during peak holiday travel. Quite a few of them offered the same alternate route: a pleasant jaunt through Southern Maryland via U.S. 301, crossing into Virginia on the Governor Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge. Among the readers who recommended such a strategy were Ann Heether and Ted Lingelbach of Parkville. "We agree that I-495 and I-95 South in Northern Virginia are a Nightmare," they wrote.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
For more than 360 years -- dating back to the landing of the Ark and the Dove with the state's first European settlers -- Southern Maryland farmers have been growing and selling tobacco.But that tradition faces a serious threat by a proposed $368.5 billion settlement between tobacco companies and state attorneys general. The settlement is currently hung up in Congress."It's the biggest threat in the history of the industry," said Claude G. McKee, retired head of the University of Maryland's tobacco experimental farm in Upper Marlboro, said of legislative -proposals that would significantly reduce the price state farmers receive for their crop.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
FEATURES
April 19, 1992
Kilted clansmen will gather at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard on Saturday for the 14th annual Celtic Festival of Southern Maryland. The event, which celebrates the cultural heritage of the Celtic people, provides a day of music, dance, storytelling, athletic competitions and family fun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.Professional and amateur athletes will compete in the Scottish Heptathlon with such events as the hammer throw, caber toss and sheaf toss. There will be clan challenges, junior highland games and Celtic and kilted mile foot races.
FEATURES
April 21, 1991
The 13th annual Celtic Festival and Highland Gathering will be held Saturday at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard.Family fun is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.--clan challenges, a Scottish heptathlon for both professionals and amateurs, the Southern Maryland Highland Dance Competition and piping competitions.There will also be a Celtic market, living history exhibits, demonstrations and food.Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for seniors and children 7 to 12. The park is off Route 2/4 in Southern Maryland.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
More than three months after a Maryland study ruled out a proposed Chesapeake Bay commuter ferry between the Lower Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland as too expensive, Virginia officials are moving ahead with plans that could provide high-speed service between Crisfield on the Shore and Reedville, Va. Meanwhile, a ferry operator based in Pensacola, Fla., who wants to build the $50 million project without government help, has purchased options on property...
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