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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
BangBang Mongolian Grill is closed in Canton, but one of the partners in the franchise operation plans to reopen the location as an independent restaurant named Soyombo Mongolian Grill . Opened in February 2012 in the Can Company, the Canton location was the first in Maryland for BangBang, a create-your-own-stir-fry restaurant based in West Des Moines, Iowa. A second Maryland location opened in Bowie in March 2012 and remains open but is also converting from a BangBang into a Soyombo.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan has emerged as a major force in his party's chase for campaign cash, collecting more money since he joined the race three months ago than his rivals took in all of last year, figures from the campaign show. The real-estate executive and former aide to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reports raising more than $453,000 since he announced his candidacy for the GOP nomination in late January. And he has nearly as much cash in the bank as his closest rival, Harford County Executive David R. Craig, reported earlier this year.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Maryland's MARC commuter trains, which have always operated Monday through Friday, will begin offering weekend service between Baltimore and Washington on the Penn Line in coming months. The expansion - put on hold in 2008 when the recession hit - is possible as the result of the new transportation revenue law that raises the state's gas tax, officials said. The governor signed the bill Thursday. The news was welcomed by Baltimore officials, who said it would offer city residents a less expensive means than Amtrak of traveling to Washington for weekend events while also encouraging D.C. residents to travel to Charm City.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
Rep. John Delaney's commentary ("Natural gas is the right choice for the U.S.," April 2) speaks for the energy and job needs of Canada, Crimea, Europe, Russia, Ukraine the Midwestern United States and southern Maryland. Unmentioned in this geopolitical academic exercise are the energy and job needs of the very Congressional district he represents. I will help the congressman fill in the blanks by citing his distortions and omissions that may help him with his political base but harm everyone else in the district and create a strange sense of emptiness to people interested in growing jobs and the nation's energy needs.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Meteorologists and utility officials cautioned of possible power outages Wednesday night as wind gusts up to 50 mph blow through the region, along with possible thunderstorms and then a burst of cold air. The combination of high winds and saturated soil was expected to down tree limbs and trunks, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials warned. Slightly more than 16,000 BGE customers were without power as of 11 p.m., slightly less than half of them in Baltimore County. The National Weather Service placed Central Maryland under a wind advisory through 11 a.m. Thursday, with sustained winds of 20-30 mph and gusts of 40-50 mph. Wind gusts neared or surpassed 50 mph across the state Wednesday night, including a 53 mph gust at BWI Airport, 51 mph in West Baltimore, 51 mph in Middle River and 46 mph in Westminster.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would prohibit discrimination against transgender people. The Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which passed the Senate, 32-15, now goes to the House of Delegates. The measure would expand Maryland's anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in employment, housing, access to credit and public accommodations. Four localities — Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties — already bar discrimination based on gender identity, but there is not a state law against it. "I think we're ready to move ahead and be progressive," said Sen. Delores G. Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat, who argued that transgender civil rights ought to be protected statewide.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
By a wide margin, Maryland voters want to raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 a hour, a poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun shows. A majority of voters in every region of the state supports that wage increase, and the proposal has near-unanimous support from African-Americans, according to the poll. Statewide, 69 percent of voters surveyed said they back a proposal now being debated in the General Assembly to increase Maryland's minimum wage from the current federal level of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The House of Delegates voted Wednesday to give Maryland one of the toughest gun laws in the nation, passing a bill that would ban the sale of assault-type weapons, set a 10-bullet limit on magazines and require fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun. Delegates altered the Senate's bill during more than 10 hours of emotional floor debate that lasted over two days. Key lawmakers said they expect the differences to be resolved quickly and the legislation sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley for his promised signature.
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