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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
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SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Like that of many freshmen at St. Mary's College in Southern Maryland, Ryan Breymaier's dream of becoming a world-class sailor began at the mouth of the Potomac River, near where it empties into the Chesapeake Bay. It is there that the kid from Damascus who came to play lacrosse transformed into a man who dreamed of traversing the world's seas and breaking records. But Breymaier, a 1997 graduate with a degree in economics, paused his whirlwind life - now based in northern France - to return to the school that gave him his career, helping the Offshore Team of St.Mary's students race in this weekend's 40th Governor's Cup aboard the Yellow Jacket.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson and Peter Jensen and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Douglas M. Birch and Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | November 7, 1997
CHAPTICO -- The number of people sickened by food poisoning at a Southern Maryland church dinner swelled to 622 yesterday, and public health investigators raised the possibility that a second death may be traced to the salmonella outbreak.St. Mary's County health officials described the second possible victim as an elderly Baltimore woman who died of a heart attack this week after eating dinner Sunday at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in the tiny community of Chaptico.They were uncertain whether her death was caused by a bacterial infection, however.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
BangBang Mongolian Grill is closed in Canton, but one of the partners in the franchise operation plans to reopen the location as an independent restaurant named Soyombo Mongolian Grill . Opened in February 2012 in the Can Company, the Canton location was the first in Maryland for BangBang, a create-your-own-stir-fry restaurant based in West Des Moines, Iowa. A second Maryland location opened in Bowie in March 2012 and remains open but is also converting from a BangBang into a Soyombo.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Enrique Villa can walk from his condominium on Water Street to his job at St. Paul and Baltimore streets in about five minutes. In Maryland, that's rare. Villa and his wife, Kathryn, a physician whose commute by subway to Johns Hopkins Hospital is nearly as short, say they can't stand spending their spare time in the car. Villa, a 34-year-old architect, used to spend an hour getting to work, but cut it short by moving closer to the office. "We saw our standard of living, just from a personal psychological perspective, improve dramatically," he said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
WALDORF -- Christopher Mader slowed his low-slung silver sports car in front of the local elementary school, not far from the giant water tower, to make the turn into the suburban housing development where he lived with his parents and younger brother. It was just before 3 a.m. -- a fairly typical and quiet commute time when you're a bartender who closes the place down. Mader, 23, didn't make it home that morning. Shot dead with a single bullet that sailed through his open window, he was killed instantly, before his car veered into a pole and an embankment with his foot still on the pedal.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
EASTON -- Foresters estimate that up to 40 percent of the trees in a band extending from Southern Maryland across the mid-Eastern Shore incurred "severe damage" during a rare, extended ice storm earlier this month."
FEATURES
By KATHY LALLY | September 30, 1990
On a hot Thursday afternoon, Eileen Shlagel drops a cucumber into a paper bag and adds 25 cents to her customer's bill, a simple enough act that requires the before-dawn-to-after-dusk labor of Eileen and her husband, Russell, their two oldest sons and Mr. Shlagel's parents, backed up by half-a-million dollars' worth of tractors, pickup trucks, combines, plastic mulch layers, plastic mulch removers, rakes, irrigation pipes and 200 acres of former tobacco land...
NEWS
December 29, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Frank Keech Turner, a retired chairman of the Bank of Southern Maryland and lifelong resident of Charles County, will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Ignatius Chapel Point, Bel Alton, in Southern Maryland.Mr. Turner, 69, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday at Physicians Memorial Hospital in La Plata.He worked 29 years for the Bank of Southern Maryland before retiring as chairman of the board in 1985. Earlier, he was a member of the board of directors of Mercantile Bank and Trust in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sierra Gladfelter | April 14, 2013
After protesting at a nearby coal plant in 2008 and becoming discouraged with his own dependence on unsustainable energy, Charles County Commissioner Ken Robinson decided to build a wind generator on his coastal property and get off the grid. He became the first individual in Southern Maryland to build one on his land. After Mr. Robinson made the rounds to neighbors, the community embraced his idea. "Only slightly taller than a flag pole," the 33-foot turbine produces 30 percent to 40 percent of Mr. Robinson's power.
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