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By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1993
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- U.N. peacekeeping forces withdrew from three villages in southern Lebanon yesterday and handed their positions over to the regular Lebanese army as tension grew in the area between Muslim fundamentalist guerrillas and Israeli troops.The U.N. flag was taken down as the Ghanaian battalion of the U.N. Interim Force in Lebanon pulled out from Maarakeh, Janata and Yanouh. Four hundred Lebanese soldiers backed by armored personnel carriers moved into the three villages and hoisted the Lebanese flag.
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NEWS
By Raed Rafei and Louise Roug and Raed Rafei and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2007
AIN AL-HILWEH, Lebanon -- Islamic militants attacked an army checkpoint yesterday in the south near the country's largest Palestinian refugee camp, raising fears that a second front has opened between the Lebanese army and al-Qaida-inspired militants. Thousands of soldiers are deployed in the northern part of the country, fiercely battling a few hundred fighters who are holed up in a Palestinian refugee camp there. Fighters from the Jund al-Sham group attacked the checkpoint at the entrance to the Ain al-Hilweh camp, using rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 14, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Israeli troops fought an intense battle with pro-Iranian guerrillas in southern Lebanon for most of yesterday after three Israeli paratroopers were killed in an ambush on their armored vehicle as it patrolled along the edge of Israel's cross-border security zone.After guerrillas belonging to the Party of God, or Hezbollah, detonated a roadside bomb and destroyed the armored vehicle, Israeli forces counterattacked with warplanes, helicopter gunships, tanks and artillery, according to reports from the region.
NEWS
By DAVID WOOD and DAVID WOOD,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- From the foiled London airliner bombing plot to the bloody street carnage in Baghdad and smoking wreckage of southern Lebanon came chilling reminders last week that the United States and its allies are locked in a long war with a ruthless, technically adept enemy, one the United States is ill-prepared to confront and cannot fully defeat, senior officials say. Strategists call this "unrestricted warfare" to describe the way it is fought: outside...
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
KIBBUTZ MERKHAVYA, Israel -- Nitzam Grossman remembers from the comfort of his living room his Israeli army days in southern Lebanon during the early '90s, dismissed now with a small shrug. It didn't then seem like a war. The last time his kibbutz buried one of its young men because of a combat death was in 1982, he recalled. It was during what Israelis may decide to rename the First Lebanon War. Twenty-four years later, the kibbutz has suffered another combat loss, its first in the Second Lebanon War, accompanied by a round of introspection and worry about whether the future will bring more insecurity than the present.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | August 7, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Israel's enemies replied to progress in the peace talks by staging attacks in the West Bank that killed three Israeli soldiers and by renewed shelling of Israeli-held positions in Lebanon yesterday."
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | May 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- We have seen this scene before: The Israelis marching out of southern Lebanon after more than 20 years of occupation and the enemy rolling in, waving their strange flags. The scenario is the same as it was in Vietnam, the French and then the Americans marching out after decades as the enemy rolled in, waving their flags. We will, sadly, see it again in Kosovo -- in a year, two years, a decade, a generation. The Americans and our NATO allies will march out in fine order, leaving the land and the people there to the tender mercies of the enemy.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Even before yesterday's bruising day on the battlefields of southern Lebanon, Israel's leaders had begun scaling back public expectations of a decisive - or quick - victory over the guerrillas of Hezbollah. Heading into the confrontation, senior Israeli officials had declared that the Shiite Muslim militia would be dealt a blow from which it could not recover. Its arsenal would be destroyed and its fighters driven out of southern Lebanon, the officials said. Some spoke openly of killing Hezbollah's leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, who triggered the confrontation two weeks ago by sending guerrillas on a deadly cross-border raid that resulted in the capture of two Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 14, 1997
JERUSALEM -- They buried Israeli army Staff Sgt. Ori Biton beside his best friend in the cemetery of the town of their youth. Eight months after a guerrilla ambush killed his boyhood pal in southern Lebanon, Biton died in the same quagmire that has bedeviled Israel for more than a decade.Biton, a 21-year-old Israeli from the West Bank settlement of Kedumim, is the first Israeli army casuality of the new year. But if the clashes between Arab guerrillas and Israeli forces in southern Lebanon intensify as some military observers fear, the number of casualties will grow.
NEWS
By HENRY CHU AND KIM MURPHY and HENRY CHU AND KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 10, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel suffered its worst military death toll in a month of fighting in southern Lebanon as 15 soldiers were killed yesterday during ground skirmishes with Hezbollah guerrillas. Hours earlier, as diplomats failed to forge a cease-fire agreement acceptable to both sides, the Israeli Security Cabinet approved an expansion of the army's ground offensive, heralding a possible intensification in Israel's war against the Hezbollah militant group. Hundreds of Israeli tanks, missile launchers and other armor massed in northern Israel, firing a thunderous barrage of artillery into Lebanon as soldiers crossed the border from the Metulla area in larger numbers than in previous days.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
JERUSALEM -- These are busy days on the rocky, shaded slopes of Mount Herzl military cemetery in Jerusalem. While family and friends wept and embraced at the funeral of Staff Sgt. Phillip Mosko, one of the latest fatalities of Israel's war with Hezbollah, cemetery workers had cleared away ground to prepare for at least four other gravesites nearby. Yesterday's decision by Israel's Security Cabinet to authorize a broader and risky ground offensive into southern Lebanon will mean these graves and perhaps scores more will be put to use in the weeks ahead.
NEWS
By HENRY CHU AND KIM MURPHY and HENRY CHU AND KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 10, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel suffered its worst military death toll in a month of fighting in southern Lebanon as 15 soldiers were killed yesterday during ground skirmishes with Hezbollah guerrillas. Hours earlier, as diplomats failed to forge a cease-fire agreement acceptable to both sides, the Israeli Security Cabinet approved an expansion of the army's ground offensive, heralding a possible intensification in Israel's war against the Hezbollah militant group. Hundreds of Israeli tanks, missile launchers and other armor massed in northern Israel, firing a thunderous barrage of artillery into Lebanon as soldiers crossed the border from the Metulla area in larger numbers than in previous days.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
KIBBUTZ MERKHAVYA, Israel -- Nitzam Grossman remembers from the comfort of his living room his Israeli army days in southern Lebanon during the early '90s, dismissed now with a small shrug. It didn't then seem like a war. The last time his kibbutz buried one of its young men because of a combat death was in 1982, he recalled. It was during what Israelis may decide to rename the First Lebanon War. Twenty-four years later, the kibbutz has suffered another combat loss, its first in the Second Lebanon War, accompanied by a round of introspection and worry about whether the future will bring more insecurity than the present.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
AVIVIM, Israel-- --The sergeant stood in the road yesterday and looked at his tank's damaged right tread, which lay unspooled on the torn pavement. Boulders in southern Lebanon, less than half a mile away, had caused the problems this time, not the mortars or machine guns. Sgt. Alex, as he identified himself, was part of a four-member Israeli crew in an armored convoy. The soldiers' army green uniforms were turning dark with grease and sweat as the men labored over their tank. The temperature yesterday morning was rising into the 90s. They had begun working the previous day about noon, kept working through the night and still had hours to go. "It's just like here," the sergeant said, looking at the steep terrain, where the bitterly contested Lebanese town of Bint Jbail was a valley and hilltop away.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Even before yesterday's bruising day on the battlefields of southern Lebanon, Israel's leaders had begun scaling back public expectations of a decisive - or quick - victory over the guerrillas of Hezbollah. Heading into the confrontation, senior Israeli officials had declared that the Shiite Muslim militia would be dealt a blow from which it could not recover. Its arsenal would be destroyed and its fighters driven out of southern Lebanon, the officials said. Some spoke openly of killing Hezbollah's leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, who triggered the confrontation two weeks ago by sending guerrillas on a deadly cross-border raid that resulted in the capture of two Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2000
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian Authority leader Yasser Arafat are taking steps to revive their stalled peace talks, overshadowed for the past week by Israel's abrupt withdrawal from Lebanon. Barak is to fly to Germany tomorrow to meet with President Clinton and discuss the "implications" of the withdrawal and "ways to advance the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations in particular," the prime minister's office announced yesterday. Arafat, meanwhile, has restrained the often-violent Palestinian demonstrations of recent weeks, which had prompted Israel to suspend the talks.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 4, 1995
MARJAYOUN, Occupied Lebanon -- The hills here are barren and still, but their creases hide a belly-crawling war that can bloom in an instant of gunfire and death.This is Israel's last battlefront, a place where casualties on both sides remind of the purpose of the Middle East peace negotiations.Yesterday, two more Israeli soldiers were killed and five were wounded, adding to the toll in a war of endurance. Neither side expects to vanquish the other, only to surpass the enemy's tolerance for this monotony of death.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 1997
JERUSALEM -- New tensions grew in Israel yesterday after rockets fired from Lebanon slammed into a town near the country's northern border after a week of growing attacks between Israeli forces and Hezbollah guerrillas.The early-morning salvo, which left an Israeli woman slightly wounded and damaged a synagogue, was a clear violation of the April 1996 cease-fire that ended a 17-day Israeli military campaign. The attack came in apparent retaliation for an aggressive new posture shown by Israel in a week in which 13 people have been killed, including seven Lebanese civilians.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | May 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- We have seen this scene before: The Israelis marching out of southern Lebanon after more than 20 years of occupation and the enemy rolling in, waving their strange flags. The scenario is the same as it was in Vietnam, the French and then the Americans marching out after decades as the enemy rolled in, waving their flags. We will, sadly, see it again in Kosovo -- in a year, two years, a decade, a generation. The Americans and our NATO allies will march out in fine order, leaving the land and the people there to the tender mercies of the enemy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 1997
JERUSALEM -- New tensions grew in Israel yesterday after rockets fired from Lebanon slammed into a town near the country's northern border after a week of growing attacks between Israeli forces and Hezbollah guerrillas.The early-morning salvo, which left an Israeli woman slightly wounded and damaged a synagogue, was a clear violation of the April 1996 cease-fire that ended a 17-day Israeli military campaign. The attack came in apparent retaliation for an aggressive new posture shown by Israel in a week in which 13 people have been killed, including seven Lebanese civilians.
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