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By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,Chicago Tribune | February 26, 2009
KUT, Iraq -There's something conspicuously absent from the bustling streets of this small provincial capital in southern Iraq, which on a Saturday afternoon is filled with people out shopping, sipping tea in cafes, herding their sheep along sidewalks or simply strolling along the Tigris River. Missing are the vast concrete barriers that had surrounded the police stations, the army barracks, government buildings and the town's only hotel. The local police chief ordered them torn down after last month's provincial elections, saying the threat from militias and insurgents is so negligible as to render them unnecessary.
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NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,Chicago Tribune | February 26, 2009
KUT, Iraq -There's something conspicuously absent from the bustling streets of this small provincial capital in southern Iraq, which on a Saturday afternoon is filled with people out shopping, sipping tea in cafes, herding their sheep along sidewalks or simply strolling along the Tigris River. Missing are the vast concrete barriers that had surrounded the police stations, the army barracks, government buildings and the town's only hotel. The local police chief ordered them torn down after last month's provincial elections, saying the threat from militias and insurgents is so negligible as to render them unnecessary.
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NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | February 21, 2007
LONDON -- Prime Minister Tony Blair is expected to announce Britain's first major troop pullout from Iraq, with 1,500 troops likely to return home within the next few months, British news agencies reported yesterday. A total of 3,000 troops - more than 40 percent of Britain's contingent in Iraq - could be pulled out by the end of the year, if the handover of security to Iraqi government forces in the southern part of the country continues to go smoothly, the reports said. Britain has long been the most important coalition member in Iraq after the United States.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2008
BAGHDAD - Australian troops ended their main combat mission in Iraq yesterday, handing over their responsibilities in southern Iraq to U.S. forces. An estimated 550 Australian troops, who served in a training and backup role to Iraqi forces in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna, made the transfer in a ceremony at Camp Talil outside Nasiriya, said Capt. Chris Ford, a British military spokesman in southern Iraq. Meanwhile, U.S. officials announced that a bomb killed an American soldier yesterday in Baghdad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2003
WITH THE 75TH EXPLOITATION TASK FORCE, in northern Kuwait - Two young American soldiers have been rescued by Marines after being stranded in the southern Iraqi desert for seven days. Spc. Jeffrey Klein, 20, and Sgt. Matthew Koppi, 22, mechanics with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division, were in good spirits, if thirsty, hungry and tired, after their rescue Friday, when Marines in Chinook helicopters spotted them dug into trenches in the flat sand. No one was quite sure yesterday whether or why their unit had failed to notice their absence or that of an officer's Humvee.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 21, 2003
A powerful storm system is likely to pummel military forces in and around Iraq with blinding sand and choking dust beginning Monday night, meteorologists predicted yesterday. The storm, from the same weather system that blanketed Moscow with heavy snow yesterday, will probably be nearly twice as strong as the one that grounded helicopters and limited troop movements in Kuwait Wednesday, private and government meteorologists said. Winds are expected to exceed 50 mph in gusts in southern Iraq, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, said meteorologists at Accuweather.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
NAJAF, Iraq - An armed Shiite Muslim revolt intensified across southern Iraq yesterday, spreading to previously quiet areas and leaving a dozen Marines dead in one clash. The U.S.-led coalition was struggling to contain the strife in Sunni and Shiite Muslim areas after three days of fighting claimed the lives of 30 Americans, two other coalition troops and at least 120 Iraqis. Some of the heaviest fighting yesterday occurred in the Sunni Triangle city of Ramadi when insurgents attacked a Marine position near the provincial governor's palace, killing a dozen Marines and wounding 20 more, according to a Pentagon official in Washington.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
NEAR THE IRAQ-KUWAIT BORDER - Sheik Wallay Rakan draws no lines in time, no measurements in months or days. His life moves in seasons. The signposts that mark his road are the births of his children, the loss of his camels, the death of his eldest son. So he can't tell the exact year when the black days began. But when he had to sell his last, favorite camel, Aliyan, he knew he was losing his grip on survival. He sits cross-legged, his back ramrod straight, under the roof of chaotically stitched sacks that line his low, black-wool Bedouin tent.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. Colin L. Powell said yesterday that the United States would leave enough troops in southern Iraq "for some months to come" to pressure President Saddam Hussein to step down or agree to a more lasting peace.General Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, also said U.S. fighter jets would continue to shoot down any Iraqi planes that took to the skies.In an hourlong interview with several newspaper reporters, he said he was encouraged that the rebellions in northern and southern Iraq have lasted longer and posed a greater threat to the Hussein regime than the United States had expected.
NEWS
By Micah Zenko | February 21, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's explanations for Friday's airstrikes against Iraqi command and control centers represent a long-held misunderstanding of the original intention of the no-fly zones, namely protecting Kurdish refugees in northern Iraq and Shi'a Muslims in southern Iraq. A Pentagon spokesman described the attacks as necessary to counter the increased frequency of Iraqi anti-air artillery and missile attacks against Anglo-American planes enforcing the no-fly zone. Mr. Bush described the strikes as a "routine mission" intended to make Saddam Hussein abide by the agreements he signed after the Persian Gulf war. The president added that the United States was going to "watch very carefully as to whether or not he develops weapons of mass destruction."
NEWS
October 31, 2007
If there's an upside to high oil prices, it's this: They might make it harder for the Bush administration to go to war against Iran. Yesterday, a barrel of oil fetched almost $94, up $10 in the two weeks since fears of a Turkish invasion of the Kurdish areas of northern Iraq began to take hold. Everybody understands that if Turkey enters into the war in Iraq on a side that's not exactly the same as America's, there will be untold turmoil and a whole lot of dread. That's why the price of oil shot up when Turkey began to bluster, and why it would take off toward dizzying heights if the Turks actually crossed the border in a major way. And that's just Turkey and Kurdistan.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 9, 2007
LONDON -- Britain will cut its force in Iraq by half in the spring, shrinking the commitment of the United States' leading military partner to 2,500 troops, most of them engaged mainly in training Iraqi forces, Prime Minister Gordon Brown said yesterday. The announcement goes much further than a reduction of 1,000 troops that the prime minister announced last week in Baghdad, the Iraqi capital, and it sets the stage for Britain's departure as an active combat participant in the troubled region of southern Iraq, where its troops are based.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Despite a determined Defense Department effort to protect troops from deadly roadside bombs, the toll in Iraq continues to rise, with at least 19 American servicemen killed in the past week when insurgents' bombs tore their vehicles. Since the war began four years ago, Pentagon officials acknowledge, more than 2,000 U.S. troops have been killed and about 18,000 wounded when improvised bombs have shattered even heavily armored Humvees and other vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | February 21, 2007
LONDON -- Prime Minister Tony Blair is expected to announce Britain's first major troop pullout from Iraq, with 1,500 troops likely to return home within the next few months, British news agencies reported yesterday. A total of 3,000 troops - more than 40 percent of Britain's contingent in Iraq - could be pulled out by the end of the year, if the handover of security to Iraqi government forces in the southern part of the country continues to go smoothly, the reports said. Britain has long been the most important coalition member in Iraq after the United States.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Sectarian warfare directed mostly at Shiite Muslim pilgrims and worshipers celebrating the climax of an important religious holiday left more than 60 Iraqis dead yesterday, including eight bodies found here in the capital. Also, details emerged about arrests in the wake of a bold insurgent raid Jan. 20 on a joint U.S.-Iraqi security compound in Karbala in which a U.S. soldier was killed and four other American troops were captured and shot to death miles away. A police official in Hillah said four Saudis staying in a Karbala hotel were arrested in connection with the attack.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2007
LONDON -- Prime Minister Tony Blair rejected calls yesterday to withdraw British soldiers from Iraq by October, then dodged a blistering debate in Parliament in which there was almost unanimous condemnation for the war and little optimism for a U.S. plan to boost troop presence in Baghdad. Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett suggested that British troops might complete the handover of security responsibilities in southern Iraq to the Iraqi government by November. But she said a withdrawal would depend on "conditions and circumstances."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The United States has urged its allies to joi in threatening Iraq with military action if Baghdad does not remove newly deployed surface-to-air missiles that menace allied warplanes patrolling southern Iraq, Bush administration officials said yesterday.U.S. officials have consulted with British, French and Saudi officials over the proposed ultimatum, which could be issued as early as today.Bush administration officials declined to comment while Washington and its allies sought to work out the details of the demand.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2000
Roman Catholic Archbishop Gabriel Kassab of Basra in southern Iraq brought a message yesterday to the United States: End the decade-old economic sanctions against his country and the suffering they have brought. "I want to say that as a witness I saw in many hospitals not even a syringe available to give shots, and there were some operations done without anesthesia," Kassab said yesterday atop the steps of the Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By RAHEEM SALMAN AND BORZOU DARAGAHI and RAHEEM SALMAN AND BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 2006
BASRA, Iraq -- This once-placid port city is looking a lot like the mob-ruled Chicago of the 1920s, an arena for settling scores between rival gangs, many with ties to the highest echelons of local and national political power. Basra's sudden political troubles and violence are rooted in a bloody competition for control of millions of dollars in smuggled oil, residents and officials say. On the Shatt al Arab waterway and off the coast of the Persian Gulf, boats wait to receive Iraq's smuggled oil, the most visible sign of what many suspect are vast multinational criminal gangs selling subsidized and stolen petroleum products for a premium in Iran, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND SAAD KHALAF and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND SAAD KHALAF,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- At least a dozen Shiite worshipers in the capital city and the leading Sunni Arab cleric of southern Iraq were killed yesterday in a new round of sectarian violence, tarnishing the Muslim day of worship despite a highly publicized security plan unveiled this week that included a Friday vehicle ban in the capital meant to halt the targeting of religious sites. Sheik Yossef Hassan, the most prominent Sunni religious figure of the country's south and prayer leader of Basra's Great Mosque, was assassinated by three gunmen on foot as he drove to the troubled port city's main Sunni house of worship.
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