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By Edward Gunts | April 18, 1991
The Trammell Crow Co.'s plan to construct the tallest office building in Baltimore apparently was kept alive yesterday, as Signet Bank/Maryland canceled a foreclosure sale of the Southern Hotel -- a key component of the tract of land Trammell Crow was assembling.Steve Fox, a representative of Michael Fox Auctioneers, told people coming to the auction at 1 p.m. yesterday that it had been called off earlier in the day by Signet, the lender that had initiated foreclosure proceedings against the hotel's current owner.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Developer J. Joseph Clarke has come up with a half-dozen ideas over the past 20 years - a hotel, corporate headquarters, residences, office space - for a prominent downtown site three blocks from the Inner Harbor. But none took hold. He hopes this time will be different. So do city leaders whose patience is wearing thin with Clarke and the owner of the site, a parking lot at the corner of Light and East Redwood streets "I wish it weren't the case that it's gone on this long," said Clarke, president of J.J. Clarke Enterprises Inc. "We think that this is the best proposal that we can make for this site at this time.
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BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | March 23, 1991
The on-again, off-again plans for the historic Southern Hotel have changed once more, with the downtown property being scheduled to return to the auction block next month.The latest attempt to purchase the 14-story building at the corner of Light and Redwood streets had been made by the Trammell Crow Co. as part of its plan to build the tallest office tower in Baltimore on the site.But after trying for nearly 2 1/2 years to line up enough tenants to lease more than half the planned 750,000-square-foot building, Trammell Crow was unable to meet the latest deadline set by Signet Bank/Maryland, the property's mortgage holder, for closing on the purchase.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 26, 2009
Bertha Sander, a longtime member of Zion Lutheran Church at City Hall Plaza where for years she helped prepare and serve at the church's famous sour beef dinners, died of a cardiac arrest Oct. 19 at Oak Crest Village. She was 101. Bertha Prag, the daughter of farmers, was born and raised in Jagstheim in the Swabia region of southwest Germany. In 1928, she immigrated to Baltimore, where she worked as a governess and during the 1930s in quality control at the old Calvert Distillery in Relay.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | May 23, 1991
Two and a half years after it first tried to buy the Southern Hotel at auction as part of the site where it wants to build Baltimore's tallest office building, a group headed by the Trammell Crow Co. has completed the transaction.A joint venture of Trammell Crow and Capital Guidance of Geneva, Switzerland, took title on May 16 to the vacant 13-story hotel at 14 Light St., the largest of seven properties that Trammell Crow has tried to gain control of so it can build a 45-story office tower called One Light Street.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
If Baltimore's vacant Southern Hotel were a cat, it would have used up its nine lives long ago.Targeted at various times for reuse as a hotel, offices, apartments and luxury housing for the elderly, the 14-story building has long attracted attention from developers. When an affiliate of Washington's Capital Guidance Corp. won permission to raze the city landmark to make way for a 45-story office tower called One Light Street, that appeared to be the end of it.But 4 1/2 years after Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation approved the demolition request, Baltimore's most tenacious empty building continues to grace dTC the northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1993
The owners of the vacant Southern Hotel on Light Street received a four-year guarantee from the city zoning board yesterday that they had until 1997 to start construction at the site.Zoning board members extended the variance, which is needed to build a $180 million, 44-story tower, after an agent for the owners said that a four-year guarantee from the city was crucial to attracting tenants in a soft market.The project, proposed two years before the commercial real estate downturn began, would be the tallest building in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
The owners of the Southern Hotel plan to demolish the downtown landmark as early as this fall in preparation for a $180 million, 44-story office tower they hope to build within four years.But commercial real estate analysts said any development on the Light Street site was highly unlikely within that time frame.A proposal to build the city's tallest skyscraper on the site appeared doomed three years ago because of the weakened commercial real estate market. And despite a lingering soft market for office space downtown, Capital Guidance Corp.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
Nearly 10 years after Baltimore redevelopment officials first approved demolition of the Southern Hotel, the building's days finally appear to be numbered.Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation recently agreed not to hold up demolition of the landmark 84-year-old hotel, a decision that clears the way for construction of a $120 million, 35-story hotel and office complex called One Light Street.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced that the project is moving ahead during the annual meeting of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Liz Atwood and Georgia C. Marudas and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | March 22, 1991
The old Southern Hotel, a key part of the site on which the Trammel Crow Co. had announced plans to build the largest office tower in Baltimore, has been scheduled for foreclosure auction on April 17.Steve Fox, who is handling the sale for Michael Fox Auctioneers Inc., said an ad in today's Wall Street Journal was the first notice of the scheduled sale of the building at Light and Redwood streets, directly across from the Maryland National Bank Building.The...
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 29, 2004
The northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets has long been a place for people on the move - most recently as the site of the 14-story Southern Hotel and before that as the setting for the historic Fountain Inn. But it may soon be the address for people who want to make downtown Baltimore their more permanent home, if the owners proceed with their latest redevelopment plan. Seeking to tap into the growing market for upscale housing in Baltimore's central business district, J. Joseph Clarke Enterprises and Capital Guidance Corp.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
For an enthusiastic time in the 1980s, the site of the old Southern Hotel was going to become a trophy office tower for downtown Baltimore. In a more sober moment this year, it looked as though it would become a parking lot. But the central business district's most prominent dirt pit, which has drawn the ire of business and government leaders, may finally overcome its economic troubles. Developer J. Joseph Clarke says he's close to a deal to build an Embassy Suites hotel, parking garage and shops at Light and Redwood streets.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 19, 2002
I OFTEN USE a grim January day to sort through the stack of receipts that I accumulated in the past year. This week I became aggressive and sifted through my household papers from the past 25 years. Among them, I found something from 1978: a $3.15 receipt from the Lee Electric Co., then on Lombard Street in the Inner Harbor. Alas, that Lee address, along with others this winter, is vacant, freshly demolished in the current wave of downtown building wreckage. (The Lee firm endures elsewhere, by the way.)
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 21, 2000
WE ARE different here in Bawlamer. Some of us talk funny, and some of us might look a little funny, and the beauty of this is our self-perception: In the great homogenization of America, we've learned to appreciate the fact that we're not exactly like everybody else in America. The same is true of our buildings. You want a shopping mall, go find yourself a suburb. You want bland, the Beltway's over there. You want a little sense of history, a little sense of what we looked like long ago, a little sense of the enduring nature of that thing called a community - take a walk through the city.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
He has demolition crews ready to pull down a landmark hotel. He has a dream of raising a 35-story tower in its place. He just doesn't have the money to build anything yet.Developer J. Joseph Clarke said he hopes to begin demolition of the 81-year-old Southern Hotel this week before he has the financing to build its replacement, the $120 million One Light Street hotel and office complex.Clarke said he's moving ahead immediately because he wants the City Council to understand the urgency of approving more tax breaks for his project.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Democratic mayoral candidate Martin J. O'Malley wants to use tax revenue generated by two downtown hotels and an apartment building to create a three-person office dedicated to helping neighborhood businesses. In a news conference yesterday at the corner of Park Heights Avenue and West Cold Spring Lane, O'Malley outlined a proposal based on similar programs in Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and made possible by the federal Community Reinvestment Act. The law requires banks to make capital available in the cities where they do business.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
Owners of the Southern Hotel are seeking permission to tear down the city landmark and replace it with a park until they are ready to move ahead with construction of a $180 million office tower.Baltimore's Architectural Review Board was scheduled to see plans this week for a "people's park" that would be constructed in place of the vacant 14-story hotel at Light and Redwood streets.The presentation was postponed at the last minute but most likely will be held next month.The owners contend that the building has deteriorated to the point where it threatens public safety.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1998
Baltimore's economic development agency is proposing a multimillion-dollar property tax cut for the developers of a new, 35-story skyscraper downtown.Enabling legislation for the tax cut is expected to be introduced in the City Council Monday.The ordinance would allow the 1 Light St. tower planned for the southeast corner of Light and Baltimore streets -- site of the long-dormant Southern Hotel -- to pay lower taxes for a quarter of a century on at least a portion of the $120.2 million project.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
In a scene from Vicki Baum's potboiler novel "Grand Hotel" played out in the 1932 MGM classic film of the same name, actor Lewis Stone looks out over the crowded hotel lobby filled with the comings and goings of Greta Garbo, John and Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and Jean Hersholt and wryly mutters, "Grand Hotel ... people come ... people go ... nothing ever happens." Unlike the fictional Grand Hotel, something is sure to happen soon at Baltimore's Southern Hotel, the long-shuttered 14-story "Queen of Light Street" that opened for business in 1918 and closed its doors in 1964.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 4, 1999
GOOD NEWS for Baltimore: The Congress Hotel, on Franklin Street west of Howard Street, is to be reborn as 36 apartments. That's a win for us city nostalgia buffs after many losses of old Baltimore hotels.The bad news: the old Southern Hotel, at Light and Redwood streets, is to face the wrecking ball.Reading about the fates of such old Baltimore haunts stirs up memories that when pieced together tells much of the history of this city.For much of this century, the Baltimore area's leading hotels were concentrated downtown, the center of commerce and entertainment.
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