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NEWS
By E. Vernon Laux and E. Vernon Laux,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- A wayward yellow-nosed albatross that apparently strayed from its marine habitat in the Southern Hemisphere has turned up in the New York metropolitan area, and has been spotted flying along the median strip of the Garden State Parkway. The albatross -- a seagoing species with wingspans up to 7 feet -- is usually found in the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and is an extreme rarity in the North Atlantic. But recently, bird experts have been astonished by reports that an albatross has been seen visiting estuaries and shorelines in the Northeast and sitting on local beaches with sea gulls.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Raspberries and blueberries are the bonanza fruit of the day, flying out of supermarkets in teeny boxes at super prices. They're everything the modern consumer demands: candy-like, ultra-convenient, famously healthful and available year round, thanks largely to Southern Hemisphere farmers. The market is so hot that both domestic production and imports are growing and - in defiance of usual market economics - supply, demand and price are all at record highs. The berry bonanza is so hot that there's a two-year wait for plants from commercial nurseries.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 15, 2004
SUTHERLAND, South Africa -- It's a 60-mile drive off the main highway in South Africa's Northern Cape to this 19th-century wool-producing town, but the desert landscape is so desolate it can feel as if the distance is 6,000 miles. The narrow tar road wiggles uphill past sheep-speckled bluffs and lonely windmills. A frigid wind howls. The sky opens up. All signs of human life seem to disappear. Then, just when it feels that you might have left Earth itself, a shiny dome-topped building perched on a barren windswept hilltop pokes above the horizon.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ-- The highest mountain system in the Southern Hemisphere is on which continent? (Answer below) Quiz answer (FROM ABOVE) South America. Source: National Geographic Bee
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ-- The highest mountain system in the Southern Hemisphere is on which continent? (Answer below) Quiz answer (FROM ABOVE) South America. Source: National Geographic Bee
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Raspberries and blueberries are the bonanza fruit of the day, flying out of supermarkets in teeny boxes at super prices. They're everything the modern consumer demands: candy-like, ultra-convenient, famously healthful and available year round, thanks largely to Southern Hemisphere farmers. The market is so hot that both domestic production and imports are growing and - in defiance of usual market economics - supply, demand and price are all at record highs. The berry bonanza is so hot that there's a two-year wait for plants from commercial nurseries.
NEWS
By George J. Bryjak | April 19, 2005
THE WORLD'S largest religion is on the verge of a major transformation as the center and influence of international Christianity moves from the Northern to Southern Hemisphere. In The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity, Philip Jenkins argues that this monumental shift is rooted in population dynamics as slow-growth, wealthy Christian nations will be overwhelmed (in terms of both numbers and influence) by fast-growth, increasingly Christian developing countries. By 2025, 50 percent of global Christendom will reside in Africa and Latin America and another 17 percent will be in Asia.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
The discovery of a new species of prehistoric raptor in some remote hills in Argentina -- the first ever found in the Southern Hemisphere -- could rewrite what we know about the ferocious creatures. The raptor was about 6 feet from head to tail, weighed about 60 pounds, lived 90 million years ago in what is now Patagonia and, like other raptors, used razor-sharp claws to slash at prey. "They were small and fast carnivorous dinosaurs," said Diego Pol, a researcher at Ohio State University, where the fossil remains were analyzed.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Hanes and Phyllis Hanes,Christian Science Monitor | March 15, 1992
Santiago, Chile -- It's winter in the United States and Canada, with a wind chill below zero at times, but supermarkets burst with fresh peaches, plums, nectarines, pears, blueberries, raspberries and juicy grapes.vTC When orchards in the Northern Hemisphere are being put to bed for the winter, farmers in Chile are starting their late summer harvest. It seems only natural to benefit from the reverse of seasons, but Chile's export fruit industry is a recent phenomenon.But the grapes are what we came to see, and the green patches of fruit against the backdrop of barren surrounding mountains are a spectacular sight.
TRAVEL
November 13, 2005
During a trip to New Zealand this fall, I came across this great view of Auckland and its Sky Tower. Since it was the beginning of spring in the Southern Hemisphere, only a few sailboats were out in this City of Sails. Lonnie Kishiyama Millersville
NEWS
By George J. Bryjak | April 19, 2005
THE WORLD'S largest religion is on the verge of a major transformation as the center and influence of international Christianity moves from the Northern to Southern Hemisphere. In The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity, Philip Jenkins argues that this monumental shift is rooted in population dynamics as slow-growth, wealthy Christian nations will be overwhelmed (in terms of both numbers and influence) by fast-growth, increasingly Christian developing countries. By 2025, 50 percent of global Christendom will reside in Africa and Latin America and another 17 percent will be in Asia.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
The discovery of a new species of prehistoric raptor in some remote hills in Argentina -- the first ever found in the Southern Hemisphere -- could rewrite what we know about the ferocious creatures. The raptor was about 6 feet from head to tail, weighed about 60 pounds, lived 90 million years ago in what is now Patagonia and, like other raptors, used razor-sharp claws to slash at prey. "They were small and fast carnivorous dinosaurs," said Diego Pol, a researcher at Ohio State University, where the fossil remains were analyzed.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 15, 2004
SUTHERLAND, South Africa -- It's a 60-mile drive off the main highway in South Africa's Northern Cape to this 19th-century wool-producing town, but the desert landscape is so desolate it can feel as if the distance is 6,000 miles. The narrow tar road wiggles uphill past sheep-speckled bluffs and lonely windmills. A frigid wind howls. The sky opens up. All signs of human life seem to disappear. Then, just when it feels that you might have left Earth itself, a shiny dome-topped building perched on a barren windswept hilltop pokes above the horizon.
NEWS
By E. Vernon Laux and E. Vernon Laux,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- A wayward yellow-nosed albatross that apparently strayed from its marine habitat in the Southern Hemisphere has turned up in the New York metropolitan area, and has been spotted flying along the median strip of the Garden State Parkway. The albatross -- a seagoing species with wingspans up to 7 feet -- is usually found in the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and is an extreme rarity in the North Atlantic. But recently, bird experts have been astonished by reports that an albatross has been seen visiting estuaries and shorelines in the Northeast and sitting on local beaches with sea gulls.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Hanes and Phyllis Hanes,Christian Science Monitor | March 15, 1992
Santiago, Chile -- It's winter in the United States and Canada, with a wind chill below zero at times, but supermarkets burst with fresh peaches, plums, nectarines, pears, blueberries, raspberries and juicy grapes.vTC When orchards in the Northern Hemisphere are being put to bed for the winter, farmers in Chile are starting their late summer harvest. It seems only natural to benefit from the reverse of seasons, but Chile's export fruit industry is a recent phenomenon.But the grapes are what we came to see, and the green patches of fruit against the backdrop of barren surrounding mountains are a spectacular sight.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | September 23, 2007
The Fall Equinox arrives today at 5:54 a.m., marking the start of the northern autumn. It's the moment the sun crosses the celestial equator - the plane of Earth's equator extended out into space - and heads south. That makes this the first day of spring for the Southern Hemisphere. On paper, night and day are equal lengths today. But it's the center of the sun's disk that rises and sets 12 hours apart. We see Sol's top half for an extra seven minutes.
BUSINESS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 20, 1996
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s alternative-energy subsidiary yesterday announced the formation of a joint venture with a Massachusetts company that will invest $6 million to develop hydroelectric and other power plants in Latin America.Constellation Power Inc.'s partnering with Energia Global Inc. on the Costa Rican plants marks the second investment by the BGE subsidiary in the southern hemisphere. Last July, Constellation led a consortium in buying a controlling interest in the Valle Hermosa Co., a Bolivian energy company, for $34 million.
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