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TRAVEL
By Michael Hill and By Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2002
The view from near the summit of Mount Ventoux is stunning. The mountain rises almost its entire 6,263 feet from the vineyard-covered landscape of Provence, so its barren upper slopes offer an unimpeded vista of the charming splendor of this region of southern France. Not for me. My view consisted of the front tire of my bicycle and the asphalt road that was flowing so very slowly beneath it as I laboriously pushed down first one pedal, then the other. When the leading riders of the Tour de France pedal this route today, they will be trying to win a bicycle race.
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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The former executive chef at Petit Louis will open La Cuchara , a Basque restaurant in the Meadow Mill complex, this summer. The chef is Ben Lefenfeld, a veteran of the Foreman Wolf restaurant group, who also worked at Charleston and who helped Foreman Wolf open Johnny's in Roland Park. Lefenfeld has signed a lease with Eutaw Property Enterprises at Meadow Mill, which was built by the sailcloth manufacturer William Hooper Co. in 1877 and whose most notable tenant was the London Fog company.
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NEWS
February 11, 2005
Stephen Gregg Sr., 90, who won the Medal of Honor for helping rescue seven wounded comrades in southern France during World War II, died Friday in Bayonne, N.J. With fellow soldiers wounded by grenades and under continuing attack, Mr. Gregg fired at the enemy and advanced up a hill followed by a medic. Later, he worked for the Hudson County, N.J., sheriff.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2005
Four years ago, Cathy and Bill Marrow happened upon a 100-year-old house for sale on King George Street in historic Annapolis. With its steep asphalt roof and multipaned narrow windows, the home reminded the couple of their many happy visits to the south of France and a lifestyle they found so appealing. Cathy Marrow, a 62-year-old interior designer and home renovator, sized up the Old World-style cottage with the critical eye of a seasoned professional. The interior was "dark as midnight," with worn wallpaper and chopped-up rooms.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 25, 1992
I have trouble with wines. I can never remember whether the red goes with the Wheaties or the Cheerios. And maybe that's why I had a little trouble with "Year of the Comet," a movie about wine.According to press notes, it grew out of no more compelling raison d'etre than director Peter Yates and screenwriter William Goldman had apartments near each other in New York and summer homes near each other in Southern France (tough life, eh, guys?) and they spent many merry afternoons together discovering that they shared enthusiasms for wine, Southern France and the Scottish Highlands.
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Maurice Bourges-Maunoury, 78, a leader of the French resistance who later held several Cabinet posts, died Wednesday in Paris. He joined the French army as an artillery lieutenant in 1939, was captured by the Germans in 1940 and was set free the next year. He joined the resistance and made repeated clandestine trips between France and Britain. When the allies launched the D-Day invasion, he parachuted into southern France to organize a sabotage campaign. After the war, he won a parliamentary seat for the Radical Party in 1946 and became deputy budget minister in 1947.
FEATURES
August 15, 2000
Today in history: Aug. 15 In 1769, Napoleon Bonaparte was born on the island of Corsica. In 1935, humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post were killed when their airplane crashed in Alaska. In 1939, the MGM musical "The Wizard of Oz" premiered at the Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood. In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces landed in southern France. In 1945, this day was proclaimed VJ Day by the Allies, a day after Japan agreed to surrender unconditionally. In 1947, India became independent after some 200 years of British rule.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | August 11, 1993
To foodies, Robert Carrier stands for quality. On the international culinary scene for 40 years, this author, chef and restaurateur always has put forth a superior product, and he has done it again in 1993.His new cookbook, "Feasts of Provence" (Rizzoli, $37.50), is a sentimental journey to one of France's havens for gourmets, which he first visited as a young man right after World War II. It also is his first major cookbook since "A Taste of Morocco" (Potter, 1987).The pricey "Provence" is as much a travel journal -- an affectionate adventure through Southern France -- as it is a book for cooks.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 19, 1995
PARIS -- In the mountains of southern France, explorers have discovered an underground cave full of Stone Age paintings so beautifully made and well preserved that experts are calling it one of the archaeological finds of the century.The enormous underground cavern, which was found last month in a gorge near the town of Vallon-Pont-d'Arc in the Ardeche region, is studded with more than 300 vivid images of animals and human hands that experts believe were made some 20,000 years ago.In this great parade of beasts appear woolly-haired rhinos, bears, mammoths, oxen and other images from the end of the Paleolithic era, creatures large and small and variously drawn in yellow ochre, charcoal and hematite.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The former executive chef at Petit Louis will open La Cuchara , a Basque restaurant in the Meadow Mill complex, this summer. The chef is Ben Lefenfeld, a veteran of the Foreman Wolf restaurant group, who also worked at Charleston and who helped Foreman Wolf open Johnny's in Roland Park. Lefenfeld has signed a lease with Eutaw Property Enterprises at Meadow Mill, which was built by the sailcloth manufacturer William Hooper Co. in 1877 and whose most notable tenant was the London Fog company.
NEWS
February 11, 2005
Stephen Gregg Sr., 90, who won the Medal of Honor for helping rescue seven wounded comrades in southern France during World War II, died Friday in Bayonne, N.J. With fellow soldiers wounded by grenades and under continuing attack, Mr. Gregg fired at the enemy and advanced up a hill followed by a medic. Later, he worked for the Hudson County, N.J., sheriff.
TRAVEL
By Michael Hill and By Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2002
The view from near the summit of Mount Ventoux is stunning. The mountain rises almost its entire 6,263 feet from the vineyard-covered landscape of Provence, so its barren upper slopes offer an unimpeded vista of the charming splendor of this region of southern France. Not for me. My view consisted of the front tire of my bicycle and the asphalt road that was flowing so very slowly beneath it as I laboriously pushed down first one pedal, then the other. When the leading riders of the Tour de France pedal this route today, they will be trying to win a bicycle race.
FEATURES
August 15, 2000
Today in history: Aug. 15 In 1769, Napoleon Bonaparte was born on the island of Corsica. In 1935, humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post were killed when their airplane crashed in Alaska. In 1939, the MGM musical "The Wizard of Oz" premiered at the Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood. In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces landed in southern France. In 1945, this day was proclaimed VJ Day by the Allies, a day after Japan agreed to surrender unconditionally. In 1947, India became independent after some 200 years of British rule.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Most audiences know Douglas Fairbanks Jr. only as the suave 1930s movie star with chiseled good looks and pencil-thin mustache, dressed in elegantly cut double-breasted Savile Row lounge suits, rather than his career during World War II as a U.S. Navy officer who commanded two British gunboats during the invasion of southern France in 1944. Fairbanks, who died earlier this month, was born into Hollywood royalty as the son of the legendary swashbuckler, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., who thrilled silent screen audiences with his heroic roles and dashing good looks.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 27, 2000
When the cost of lettuce soars, salad-making can be a tossup. One solution is to enliven the salad course with some inexpensive, nutritious ingredients that often get relegated to side-dish status: rice and other grains. Combined with fresh seasonal vegetables and assertive dressings and seasonings, cooked grains bring new tastes and textures to salads. Styled after a classic Salade Nicoise, this salad combines rice and a few fresh vegetables with marinated artichokes, anchovies, olives and other robust flavors reminiscent of the French Riviera.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 29, 1999
During the past 10 years, my husband and I have been fortunate enough to spend a few weeks each summer in southern France. Celebrated for its natural beauty, the region boasts rugged mountains, beautiful beaches and endless fields of lavender and flowers.For art lovers, there are myriad museums that house masterpieces of painters who lived and worked in Provence. Then, of course, there's the perfect summer weather -- warm and almost always sunny.But my reason for returning time and again to this area is to savor the delicious yet unpretentious food.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Most audiences know Douglas Fairbanks Jr. only as the suave 1930s movie star with chiseled good looks and pencil-thin mustache, dressed in elegantly cut double-breasted Savile Row lounge suits, rather than his career during World War II as a U.S. Navy officer who commanded two British gunboats during the invasion of southern France in 1944. Fairbanks, who died earlier this month, was born into Hollywood royalty as the son of the legendary swashbuckler, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., who thrilled silent screen audiences with his heroic roles and dashing good looks.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2005
Four years ago, Cathy and Bill Marrow happened upon a 100-year-old house for sale on King George Street in historic Annapolis. With its steep asphalt roof and multipaned narrow windows, the home reminded the couple of their many happy visits to the south of France and a lifestyle they found so appealing. Cathy Marrow, a 62-year-old interior designer and home renovator, sized up the Old World-style cottage with the critical eye of a seasoned professional. The interior was "dark as midnight," with worn wallpaper and chopped-up rooms.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 11, 1999
My cooking students are wild about Provencal food and are always asking that I teach more classes featuring specialties from this area of France. They love the vibrant flavors of the cuisine and are intrigued by the imaginative uses of vegetables and fruits in so many Provencal recipes. They're also quick to point out that the simple dishes representative of this particular style of French country cooking are perfect for entertaining.I agree with my students on all these points and am as spirited a fan as they are. This week, for example, in a class I am showing them how to prepare Daube de Boeuf a la Provencale, a classic French dish of beef and vegetables braised in wine and stock.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | March 2, 1997
It wasn't too many years ago when the south of France was scorned by wine connoisseurs as the source of Europe's "wine lake" -- an economic ball and chain on the entire continent.You don't hear that term much any more.It's not that the vast region known as the Midi doesn't still produce vast amounts of wine. It's because perceptive wine consumers the world over have jumped into that lake, drawn by the excellent values and rapidly improving wine quality.Even California wineries have joined in the fun. A few, struggling with grape shortages because of small harvests and root louse phylloxera, have begun to buy southern French wines and sell them under their own labels.
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