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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
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NEWS
October 10, 1995
SEN. SAM NUNN'S decision to retire suggests that being a Democrat in the Senate these days is no fun. He was chairman of the Armed Forces Committee for eight years. Now he is just the ranking Democrat. Even a man as well respected as Mr. Nunn for his knowledge of national security issues and his ability to negotiate with and for his peers inevitably plays second fiddle -- at best -- when the other party is in the majority. (After decades of Democratic conservatism holding sway in the Armed Services Committee, the post-Nunn ranking minority member will be Carl Levin of Michigan, who is middle road on defense but otherwise as liberal as fellow committeeman Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - One thing seems certain about the outcome of the presidential race: On Nov. 3, the day after Election Day, close to half of the voting public will wake up angry. An electorate that was as bitterly divided as it was evenly divided in 2000 will go to the polls again in one month, even more polarized than it was four years ago. Like denizens of parallel universes, voters are split over hotly emotional issues like the war in Iraq and gay rights, and clinging to increasingly ideological parties that are moving further and further apart.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 4, 1994
REPUBLICAN candidates for the Senate came by to chat with editorial writers, and Ruthann Aron gave Bill Brock a hard time about his civil rights votes when he was in Congress.The worst was in 1964, when he voted against the Omnibus Civil Rights Act. Brock offered some excuses, instead of saying what he should have said, "That was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away."The South of those days is as remote as Tara, politically speaking. When Tennessean Brock was elected to the House in 1962, he became one of only 11 Republicans among the 106 representatives from the states of the old Confederacy.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 10, 1991
SPEAKER OF the House of Representatives is a constitutional position. Party floor leader was not created till 1899, party whip till 1901.Ever since then there was at least one Southerner in the Democratic leadership as speaker of the House, floor leader or whip -- until June 6, 1989, when Speaker Jim Wright of Texas resigned. The leadership trio became Tom Foley of Washington, speaker, Dick Gephardt of Missouri, floor leader, and Bill Gray of Pennsylvania, whip.Now Gray has resigned. Tomorrow House Democrats will vote to replace him. Steny Hoyer of Maryland and David Bonior of Michigan are the candidates.
NEWS
March 12, 1992
One commentator has compared Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's popularity in the South, even with Bible-thumping, family-value social conservatives, to one of those country and western "somebody-done-somebody-wrong" songs with a happy ending. In this case, Bill and Hillary reunited and living happily ever after. She forgave him, so why shouldn't the voters?There is no mistaking that Southern Democrats are standing by Governor Clinton. Last week, Georgia Democrats handed him a 59-23 percent victory over Paul Tsongas.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
Democrats who eye Tuesday's election with dread, fearing the loss of the House for the first time in 42 years, were given a bit of comfort this week. Rep. Bill Paxon of New York, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, said his party "is unlikely to win control of the House" unless some Democrats switch parties. He later backed away from that prediction, but those Democratic leaners still will be pivotal next year.Some Republican representatives say they know of six to 10 Democrats who would switch if that would change control of the House.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | November 8, 1998
THE BLAME game is in full effect. For sure, the national Republican Party, and some of its branch offices, Maryland included, are in disarray and deep crisis.Tuesday's elections bore an ill wind so strong that many in the GOP will have trouble comprehending their weakened national position to think rationally about solutions. It is much too early to discern whether the blows suffered have rendered them senseless or maybe will knock some sense into their hard heads.Reverberations have the sound and feel of aftershocks from an earthquake.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Two vastly dissimilar television blitzes have been launched in two days by conservatives who support Senate confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court.Announced yesterday was a TV campaign budgeted to cost $500,000 eventually and aimed specifically at the constituencies a group of Southern Democratic senators who face re-election next year.On Tuesday, a separate $100,000 campaign was launched, directly attacking the ethics of three Democratic senators and appearing to be aimed as much at avenging the defeat of Robert H. Bork's bid for a Supreme Court seat in 1987 as it was at aiding Judge Thomas.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
A single vote cast on the floor of the Senate on June 19, 1964, still resonates in the nation's body politic - most recently in the remarks by Republican Sen. Trent Lott that led to his resignation as majority leader. It was less than a year after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had stood at the other end of The Mall in Washington and delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. The civil rights demonstrators he had led and inspired were being pummeled with blasts from fire hoses in Alabama, killed in Mississippi as they challenged racial segregation - an American apartheid that institutionalized white supremacy in the South.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 12, 2000
GEORGE W. BUSH, the Texas governor and Republican presidential candidate, came to town Monday and spoke to the NAACP of, in "Dubya's" words, "racial harmony and economic advancement." The crowd was polite. Some even gave Bush a standing ovation when he rose to speak. The governor said some good things, but you had to get the feeling he was telling folks pretty much what they wanted to hear, as opposed to what they needed to hear. America doesn't need racial harmony as much as it needs racial candor.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | November 8, 1998
THE BLAME game is in full effect. For sure, the national Republican Party, and some of its branch offices, Maryland included, are in disarray and deep crisis.Tuesday's elections bore an ill wind so strong that many in the GOP will have trouble comprehending their weakened national position to think rationally about solutions. It is much too early to discern whether the blows suffered have rendered them senseless or maybe will knock some sense into their hard heads.Reverberations have the sound and feel of aftershocks from an earthquake.
NEWS
October 10, 1995
SEN. SAM NUNN'S decision to retire suggests that being a Democrat in the Senate these days is no fun. He was chairman of the Armed Forces Committee for eight years. Now he is just the ranking Democrat. Even a man as well respected as Mr. Nunn for his knowledge of national security issues and his ability to negotiate with and for his peers inevitably plays second fiddle -- at best -- when the other party is in the majority. (After decades of Democratic conservatism holding sway in the Armed Services Committee, the post-Nunn ranking minority member will be Carl Levin of Michigan, who is middle road on defense but otherwise as liberal as fellow committeeman Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 25, 1995
SPRINGFIELD, Ga. -- When Sen. Sam Nunn stepped to the microphone at a Chamber of Commerce dinner here recently, no one in the audience knew for sure if he was about to make a campaign speech or a farewell address.The last of a legendary breed of powerful Southern Democrat, the Georgia senator is thinking about retiring when his term ends next year. Polls show that he is popular enough to be re-elected, but he may not want to run.Across the South, old bulls like Mr. Nunn have been stranded high and dry by rising Republicanism.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 4, 1995
A DEMOCRATIC leader in the House of Representatives has estimated in private that his party may lose 15 seats in the South and 15 in the West next year.So long, good-bye, that's all she wrote. Democrats won't control the House again for decades. The South and West are the growth areas, and Democrats have been losing ground in both regions for years.THE SOUTH. Remember when it was called the Solid South? When from Texas to Virginia there was practically one-party politics in congressional elections?
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - One thing seems certain about the outcome of the presidential race: On Nov. 3, the day after Election Day, close to half of the voting public will wake up angry. An electorate that was as bitterly divided as it was evenly divided in 2000 will go to the polls again in one month, even more polarized than it was four years ago. Like denizens of parallel universes, voters are split over hotly emotional issues like the war in Iraq and gay rights, and clinging to increasingly ideological parties that are moving further and further apart.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
Democrats who eye Tuesday's election with dread, fearing the loss of the House for the first time in 42 years, were given a bit of comfort this week. Rep. Bill Paxon of New York, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, said his party "is unlikely to win control of the House" unless some Democrats switch parties. He later backed away from that prediction, but those Democratic leaners still will be pivotal next year.Some Republican representatives say they know of six to 10 Democrats who would switch if that would change control of the House.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 4, 1994
REPUBLICAN candidates for the Senate came by to chat with editorial writers, and Ruthann Aron gave Bill Brock a hard time about his civil rights votes when he was in Congress.The worst was in 1964, when he voted against the Omnibus Civil Rights Act. Brock offered some excuses, instead of saying what he should have said, "That was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away."The South of those days is as remote as Tara, politically speaking. When Tennessean Brock was elected to the House in 1962, he became one of only 11 Republicans among the 106 representatives from the states of the old Confederacy.
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