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By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- These are the mother's memories.Henry Lepold Bailey's cold hands are laced as if in prayer, a glittering St. Jude's medal dangling from his neck. He is wearing a black sweater and cream-colored shoes.When they slashed open the body bag, she recognized her son's worn clothes and the medal.On that languid afternoon in the Garden of Peace, by a freshly reopened mass grave stacked with military-issue body bags, Beverly Smith gazed at the steamy blue skies of Panama and thought about her dead son and stray dogs.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 30, 2011
The major who heads the Baltimore Police Department's Southern District is being moved to headquarters to head up an effort by the agency to become nationally accredited, according to a spokesman. Maj. Margaret Barillaro took over the Southern District in July of last year after a popular major, Scott Bloodsworth, retired rather than accept a new assignment overseeing reforms in the sex offense unit. The new major in South Baltimore will David Reitz, who is being promoted from his rank of deputy major in the Southeast District.
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NEWS
January 17, 2010
Former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush; Lt. Gen. Ken Keen, deputy commander of the U.S. Southern Command; Rajiv Shah, U.S. Agency for International Development administrator. 9 a.m.: WMDT (Channel 47) 10 a.m. WJLA (Channel 7) 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) Clinton, Bush, Keen, Shah. 10:30 a.m.: WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) Clinton, Bush, Keen, Shah. 10 a.m.: WGAL (Channel 8), WBAL (Channel 11)
NEWS
January 17, 2010
Former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush; Lt. Gen. Ken Keen, deputy commander of the U.S. Southern Command; Rajiv Shah, U.S. Agency for International Development administrator. 9 a.m.: WMDT (Channel 47) 10 a.m. WJLA (Channel 7) 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) Clinton, Bush, Keen, Shah. 10:30 a.m.: WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) Clinton, Bush, Keen, Shah. 10 a.m.: WGAL (Channel 8), WBAL (Channel 11)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The commander of U.S. forces in Latin America and the Caribbean has recommended the withdrawal of American troops from Haiti, saying the country's increasing political turbulence is placing them in danger.In closed-door testimony last month to a defense subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee, Marine Corps Gen. Charles Wilhelm, head of the Southern Command, said that the deployment of 500 U.S. troops should be "terminated" and replaced by periodic visits by U.S. military personnel.
NEWS
By Kenneth Freed and Kenneth Freed,Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1992
PANAMA CITY -- U.S. military and security agencies warned the White House more than a week early that President Bush faced serious danger if he carried out plans to speak at a public rally during his brief stop in Panama and urged that his appearance be canceled, U.S. and diplomatic sources say.fTC "Within 72 hours after Bush's staff told us he would be coming here, SouthCom [the U.S. military's Panama-based Southern Command] sent the Pentagon a 'trip book' saying the president should not speak [in public]
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
Three Americans kidnapped after a plane crash in Colombia two weeks ago, and a fourth who was shot and killed during the incident, worked for a Harford County-based division of Northrop Grumman Corp. that specializes in making surveillance planes for the U.S. government, company officials disclosed yesterday. The four employees were flying with a Colombian intelligence officer in a single-engine Cessna that crash-landed Feb. 13 near Florencia, Colombia. The Colombian and one of the Americans were shot by guerrillas shortly after the crash, and the others are being held by the rebel group Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 27, 1997
PARIS -- Madeleine Albright's world tour was a personal success. A New York Times headline said she ''struts across a world stage, radiating star quality.''Her trip unfortunately also illustrated the problem of American foreign policy today. It is no longer really under the control of the stars (or otherwise) of the executive branch.The issues raised during her journey include Russian hostility to NATO expansion, European opposition to America's effort to make other countries boycott Cuba, German anger at absurd and impertinent American strictures on Germany's treatment of Scientology, French hostility to the American unwillingness to yield NATO commands to European officers, Chinese resistance American human-rights demands, and the usual disputes with Japan over market access.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defying its closest allies, the Bush administration is determined to keep hundreds of suspected terrorists in detention indefinitely in Guantanamo, saying it's needed to assist a global investigation trying to prevent more terrorist attacks. In one of the administration's strongest comments, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales said none of the 158 detainees in Guantanamo would qualify for prisoner-of-war status, despite the urging of Germany, the Netherlands, the European Union and human rights groups.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 20, 2005
A combination of isolation, despair and humiliation has driven a Bahraini captive to attempt suicide at least nine times - one as recently as Monday - at the U.S. interrogation center for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, his lawyer said Friday. Jumah Dossari, 32, tried to yank stitches out of his arm from a suicide attempt last month, according to U.S. military affidavits filed in federal court. The military defends its treatment of Dossari and says it has provided him with a variety of amusements, including a screening of the Oscar-winning movie Gladiator and permission to chat with fellow prisoners while recovering in a hospital bed. The Dossari case is the latest effort by civilian attorneys to get federal judges to address Guantanamo conditions by seeking injunctions in some of the 300-plus habeas corpus petitions filed in Washington.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 20, 2005
A combination of isolation, despair and humiliation has driven a Bahraini captive to attempt suicide at least nine times - one as recently as Monday - at the U.S. interrogation center for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, his lawyer said Friday. Jumah Dossari, 32, tried to yank stitches out of his arm from a suicide attempt last month, according to U.S. military affidavits filed in federal court. The military defends its treatment of Dossari and says it has provided him with a variety of amusements, including a screening of the Oscar-winning movie Gladiator and permission to chat with fellow prisoners while recovering in a hospital bed. The Dossari case is the latest effort by civilian attorneys to get federal judges to address Guantanamo conditions by seeking injunctions in some of the 300-plus habeas corpus petitions filed in Washington.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
Three Americans kidnapped after a plane crash in Colombia two weeks ago, and a fourth who was shot and killed during the incident, worked for a Harford County-based division of Northrop Grumman Corp. that specializes in making surveillance planes for the U.S. government, company officials disclosed yesterday. The four employees were flying with a Colombian intelligence officer in a single-engine Cessna that crash-landed Feb. 13 near Florencia, Colombia. The Colombian and one of the Americans were shot by guerrillas shortly after the crash, and the others are being held by the rebel group Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defying its closest allies, the Bush administration is determined to keep hundreds of suspected terrorists in detention indefinitely in Guantanamo, saying it's needed to assist a global investigation trying to prevent more terrorist attacks. In one of the administration's strongest comments, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales said none of the 158 detainees in Guantanamo would qualify for prisoner-of-war status, despite the urging of Germany, the Netherlands, the European Union and human rights groups.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The commander of U.S. forces in Latin America and the Caribbean has recommended the withdrawal of American troops from Haiti, saying the country's increasing political turbulence is placing them in danger.In closed-door testimony last month to a defense subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee, Marine Corps Gen. Charles Wilhelm, head of the Southern Command, said that the deployment of 500 U.S. troops should be "terminated" and replaced by periodic visits by U.S. military personnel.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 27, 1997
PARIS -- Madeleine Albright's world tour was a personal success. A New York Times headline said she ''struts across a world stage, radiating star quality.''Her trip unfortunately also illustrated the problem of American foreign policy today. It is no longer really under the control of the stars (or otherwise) of the executive branch.The issues raised during her journey include Russian hostility to NATO expansion, European opposition to America's effort to make other countries boycott Cuba, German anger at absurd and impertinent American strictures on Germany's treatment of Scientology, French hostility to the American unwillingness to yield NATO commands to European officers, Chinese resistance American human-rights demands, and the usual disputes with Japan over market access.
NEWS
By Kenneth Freed and Kenneth Freed,Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1992
PANAMA CITY -- U.S. military and security agencies warned the White House more than a week early that President Bush faced serious danger if he carried out plans to speak at a public rally during his brief stop in Panama and urged that his appearance be canceled, U.S. and diplomatic sources say.fTC "Within 72 hours after Bush's staff told us he would be coming here, SouthCom [the U.S. military's Panama-based Southern Command] sent the Pentagon a 'trip book' saying the president should not speak [in public]
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 30, 2011
The major who heads the Baltimore Police Department's Southern District is being moved to headquarters to head up an effort by the agency to become nationally accredited, according to a spokesman. Maj. Margaret Barillaro took over the Southern District in July of last year after a popular major, Scott Bloodsworth, retired rather than accept a new assignment overseeing reforms in the sex offense unit. The new major in South Baltimore will David Reitz, who is being promoted from his rank of deputy major in the Southeast District.
NEWS
December 2, 1995
Gen. Maxwell Thurman, 64, a retired Army general who led the 1989 invasion of Panama and was a principal architect of the all-volunteer Army, died yesterday at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. He was diagnosed with leukemia in 1990.Called "Mad Max" and "Maxatollah" by colleagues for his aggressive style, General Thurman delayed his retirement at the request of the Bush administration so he could lead the effort to oust Gen. Manuel Noriega's regime.He was named commander of the U.S. Southern Command, based at Quarry Heights, Panama, in September 1989, with responsibility for forces in South and Central America.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- These are the mother's memories.Henry Lepold Bailey's cold hands are laced as if in prayer, a glittering St. Jude's medal dangling from his neck. He is wearing a black sweater and cream-colored shoes.When they slashed open the body bag, she recognized her son's worn clothes and the medal.On that languid afternoon in the Garden of Peace, by a freshly reopened mass grave stacked with military-issue body bags, Beverly Smith gazed at the steamy blue skies of Panama and thought about her dead son and stray dogs.
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