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By S. M. Khalid and S. M. Khalid,S. M. Khalid is a reporter for The Sun | September 23, 1990
Reality has forced the governments of war-weary southern Africa to move conflict increasingly from the battlefield to the negotiating table, not only toward a dialogue with each other, but with their internal political opponents.The transition comes after a generation that has seen the transformation of former colonies into the independent states of Angola, Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe, as well as an intensification in the struggle for a democratic South Africa. It is a generation that has also seen civil war, drought, famine, the dislocation of hundreds of thousands of people and economic deterioration throughout the region.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Jean Gartlan, a retired journalist and a Catholic Relief Services program director who worked in 1960s refugee relief in southern Africa, died of cancer Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88 and lived in Mount Vernon. "She was really a Renaissance woman," said Ken Hackett, former Catholic Relief Services president. "She was literary and traveled the world. She did some remarkable behind-the-scenes things, and ... you never knew she was there. " Born in New York City and raised in Washington Heights, she earned an English degree at the College of Mount St. Vincent and a second bachelor's degree, in journalism, from Columbia University.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 18, 1992
DAVEL, South Africa -- Koos Duur knelt on a patch of the fertile soil that for years has put the milled white corn known here as pap on the tables of millions of black families in southern Africa. His chapped hand grasped a stalk, which crumbled into dust at his touch."If we can survive this year," the 54-year-old farmer said later, lighting a cigarette, "then I think we will be able to stay in farming. But this year is our crossroads."One of the worst droughts in African history -- even more devastating than the 1984 drought in Ethiopia and Sudan -- has blotted out most of the grain crop across a wide area of southern Africa, from Zambia and Malawi to Zimbabwe and South Africa.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2002
DOWA, Malawi - For the first time in a decade, severe hunger is sweeping across southern Africa. The United Nations says that two years of erratic weather - alternating droughts and floods - coupled with mismanagement of food supplies have left 7 million people in six countries at risk of starvation. Here in this dusty village, 14 people have already died from hunger-related illnesses in the past four months, health workers say. It is harvest time, but crops are withered and many people are eating banana roots and pumpkin leaves.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 14, 2002
GWENGWE, Malawi - To reach the house of Madyawako Lepu, you follow a worn dirt footpath through this mountain village, past barren crop rows, dilapidated mud huts and a banana tree stripped bare of its fruit. In these times of hunger, it is difficult to tell if anyone is home. No goats graze in the yard. No cooking fires burn. No talking or laughter is heard. Lepu's family sits motionless on the stoop of her mud hut. With their ragged clothes and listless eyes, they look like castaways, adrift in an open sea of despair.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - With grain stores dwindling, the scourge of HIV/AIDS decimating an already weakened population and farmers fearing another grim harvest, the food crisis in southern Africa has worsened and now threatens more than 14 million people, United Nations officials announced yesterday. James T. Morris, the U.N. special envoy for humanitarian needs, said that a new assessment had found 14.4 million people in Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland are in dire need of food assistance - up from previous estimates of 12.8 million.
NEWS
October 20, 2008
The fate of Southern Africa is hanging in the balance as a result of continuing upheavals in Zimbabwe and South Africa, where political instability and economic uncertainty are threatening to unravel the promise both nations once held out of being models for the region after emerging from white minority rule more than a decade ago. It's a situation that demands international attention. In Zimbabwe, negotiations between President Robert Mugabe's ruling ZANU-PF party and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change collapsed over Mr. Mugabe's refusal to make good on a power-sharing deal signed last month that would have given Mr. Tsvangirai's party a significant role in the government.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 22, 2002
SKUKUZA, South Africa -- One of the world's largest stockpiles of ivory is housed in a concrete-walled vault here at the headquarters of South Africa's Kruger National Park. More than 5,000 elephant tusks -- some as tall as a grown man -- are stacked floor to ceiling like timber in the garage-sized room. "I don't know how much it's all worth," says Hermanus Coetzee, who manages the stockpile, after pulling open the iron vault door and gazing up at the tusks as if they were bars of gold.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - Jeremy Rose can't shake the questions about Belmont Park's unusual configuration, about the Belmont Stakes' demanding distance and about his inexperience in major races. Rose, 26, who lives in Elkton, Md., has heard countless times that jockeys, even big-name jockeys, have lost the Belmont by moving too soon, by failing to coax their horses to relax or by succumbing to the pressure. Rose, who will ride Afleet Alex in the Belmont today at Belmont Park, seems unfazed. His confidence borders on cockiness.
NEWS
October 20, 2008
The fate of Southern Africa is hanging in the balance as a result of continuing upheavals in Zimbabwe and South Africa, where political instability and economic uncertainty are threatening to unravel the promise both nations once held out of being models for the region after emerging from white minority rule more than a decade ago. It's a situation that demands international attention. In Zimbabwe, negotiations between President Robert Mugabe's ruling ZANU-PF party and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change collapsed over Mr. Mugabe's refusal to make good on a power-sharing deal signed last month that would have given Mr. Tsvangirai's party a significant role in the government.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Nigerian militants call for cease-fire LAGOS, Nigeria -- The main militant group responsible for attacks on foreign oil installations in Nigeria's lawless south announced a one-month cease-fire yesterday, giving the new president a chance to resolve the crisis that has helped cause global crude prices to spike. The Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta did not offer to stop kidnapping foreign oil workers, but it released six hostages who had been seized May 1, including one American, as a peace offering to the government.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | February 16, 2007
MARIENTAL, Namibia -- When fully grown, the plant resembles something from The Day of the Triffids or some other science-fiction creation: a squat succulent with thick, spiky arms, purple fleshy petals and seedpods like rhino horns. Hoodia gordonii is no beauty, but this humble plant is Africa's latest cash crop, priced almost like a narcotic at $40 an ounce. The plant, which grows wild in the Kalahari Desert of southern Africa, was once used by indigenous tribes to suppress hunger and thirst when hunting.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - Jeremy Rose can't shake the questions about Belmont Park's unusual configuration, about the Belmont Stakes' demanding distance and about his inexperience in major races. Rose, 26, who lives in Elkton, Md., has heard countless times that jockeys, even big-name jockeys, have lost the Belmont by moving too soon, by failing to coax their horses to relax or by succumbing to the pressure. Rose, who will ride Afleet Alex in the Belmont today at Belmont Park, seems unfazed. His confidence borders on cockiness.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 18, 2005
STILFONTEIN, South Africa - For decades, this country's gold mines represented both the worst and the best option for black laborers across southern Africa. The worst because of the dangers of underground mining and the social costs of living apart from families. The best because gold mining meant steady work at relatively high pay for anyone with a strong back. More and more, though, there is no option at all. South Africa's gold mining industry is cutting thousands of jobs because of three factors that seem beyond the country's control: rising costs of steel and other supplies; a strong local currency that batters exports; and the diminishing quality of ore hidden ever deeper in the earth.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2003
SCHMIDTSDRIFT, South Africa - Every morning the Bushmen living in this dreary outpost of thorn trees, tents and howling wind faithfully tune their radios to 99.4 FM. They wake up to the weather report. Not that the forecast is surprising in the desert. It's hot and sunny in the summer. It's cold and sunny in the winter. During the women's hour they get advice on raising children, taking stains out of clothing and avoiding cholera. The DJs spin a mix of ancient tribal chants, rock and South African hip-hop interrupted by town gossip, crime reports and death notices.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS | August 6, 2000
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Bob Swap is a big athletic-looking guy. As a walk-on football player for the University of Virginia Cavaliers, he went to the Peach Bowl in 1984. An offensive guard and center, he learned the value of teamwork for achieving success. Today, Swap is a team-building environmental scientist with a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Recently NASA appointed him as the U.S. coordinator for the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative 2000, an extensive international effort to study the atmosphere over southern Africa.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 5, 2003
In Baltimore City Trial to begin today for pastor accused of theft The trial for the Rev. Paul A. Murray, who is accused of stealing money from a women's shelter, is scheduled to begin today in Baltimore Circuit Court. Murray, 40, of the 7900 block of Parke West Drive in Glen Burnie is charged with taking more than $44,000 from the Susanna Wesley House, a women's shelter on Park Avenue in Mount Vernon, between August 2000 and June 2001, prosecutors said. Murray has served as a pastor in Glen Burnie and as chaplain for the Anne Arundel County Police Department.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Astonished officials here and across southern Africa cheered yesterday as they learned that the Bush administration planned to spend $10 billion more on AIDS drugs, education, specialized laboratories and doctors in African nations ravaged by the disease. Five countries in southern Africa, the hardest-hit region, stand to benefit from the new spending over five years. The initiative, which was announced by President Bush on Tuesday, is intended to provide AIDS drugs for 2 million people, care for 10 million AIDS patients and orphans, and provide education to prevent the epidemic.
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