Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSouth Vietnam
IN THE NEWS

South Vietnam

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers | March 6, 1991
THE VIETNAM syndrome is over!" So proclaimed President Bush on Friday, March 1. He didn't need to tell Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, who had tried to fight that war all over again. In a strange way, the gulf war ended almost exactly as the Vietnam War did, just as Hussein claimed it would. But to his surprise, instead of playing the role of North Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh, as he intended, he found himself playing the role of South Vietnam's Nguyen Van Thieu.In October, 1972, U.S. national security adviser Henry A. Kissinger met with Thieu to present the U.S. proposals to end the Vietnam War. As The Baltimore Sun's Arnold Isaacs reported, Thieu commented bitterly that to the United States, South Vietnam was no more than a dot on the map. Its loss would mean little to the United States, which had its own strategies to pursue with Moscow and Peking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 8, 2014
How dare U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talk about freedom for the Ukrainian people after he betrayed his comrades who were being killed to protect the people of South Vietnam, and President Barack Obama and Congress have shown their lack of respect for Americans when they decided to take away our freedom to choose what kind of health care we purchase. None of the current politicians have any right to judge what our freedoms are. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Advertisement
FEATURES
March 8, 2007
March 8 1965 The United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam, about 3,500 Marines sent to defend the U.S. air base at Da Nang.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
NEWS
May 24, 1997
Elbridge Durbrow, 93, a career diplomat who saw the Soviet Union turn from ally to antagonist and was named ambassador to South Vietnam in 1957, died of a stroke May 16 in Walnut Creek, Calif.Pub Date: 5/24/97
NEWS
September 12, 1998
John Henry Carpenter,70, who was acquitted four years ago in the 1978 slaying of his friend, "Hogan's Heroes" television star Bob Crane, died yesterday in Torrance, Calif. The cause of death was not released.Leonid Kinskey,95, a stylish Russian-born actor who played Sascha the bartender in "Casablanca," died Tuesday in Fountain Hills, Ariz., of complications from a stroke.Vu Van Mau,84, a prominent figure in South Vietnam and prime minister for five days before it fell to Communist North Vietnam in 1975, died Aug. 20 in Paris.
NEWS
July 18, 2002
Col. Floyd "Jimmy" Thompson, 69, an Army veteran who was the longest-held American prisoner during the Vietnam War, was found dead Tuesday in his Key West, Fla., home. He was the longest-held POW in the Vietnam War, being held 10 days short of nine years, according to the Secretary of Defense's Historical Office. He was captured in South Vietnam on March 26, 1964, after his light observation plane was shot down. He was turned over to the North Vietnamese in 1968, and was interrogated and tortured until his release on March 16, 1973.
NEWS
August 5, 1995
At an Asian foreign ministers' meeting last Sunday, China insisted on sovereignty over all the Spratly Islands and adjacent waters. Yet in the same breath, it proposed joint development by all the claimants. China's neighbors should jump at this. If China meant this in good faith, it is the peaceful way out.The Spratly Islands are hundreds of uninhabitable reefs and atolls in the South China Sea that were once prized for guano, birds' nests and offshore fish. The lure now is offshore oil.China and Taiwan, the most distant claimants, claim all the islands and most of the South China seabed.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 30, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- As the Iraqi potential for major catastrophe grows and the most anti-military administration in American history wonders what, if anything, to do about it, a new book arrives and evokes memories of other bad times not so long ago. Some of these may be relevant today.First, a little background. In the fall of 1970, a year after Bill Clinton managed to evade the draft and the same year he was working in Washington for Project Pursestrings, a lobbying effort to cut off funds for the war in Vietnam, I was a young reporter newly arrived in Saigon.
TOPIC
By Daniel Rapoport and Daniel Rapoport,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Thirty years ago - on April 30, 1975 - North Vietnamese troops marched into Saigon, and the South Vietnamese government surrendered. The last U.S. forces had left South Vietnam two years earlier. Many critics of the Bush administration's Iraq policy see in Vietnam a blueprint for disaster in Iraq where a bloody insurgency continues and political pressures mount for an early American withdrawal. Military planners, however, view that experience as a lesson on how to avoid failure.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 28, 2012
HANOI, Vietnam -- It has been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy ordered U.S. "advisers" to South Vietnam to help battle the communist North and 37 years since the end of that divisive war and the country's unification under Communism. Today, Vietnam is fighting a war with itself. A local TV program reminds a visitor of Chinese propaganda "operas" circa 1970. Performers, some wearing military garb with a backdrop of missiles and an American B-52 bomber going down in flames, commemorate the 1972 Christmas bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong ordered by President Richard Nixon.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 21, 2012
Every political candidate commits a gaffe from time to time. It becomes a major cause for concern when a pattern sets in that creates a negative image with voters. That's what is happening with Mitt Romney right now in the wake of his hapless remarks at a fundraising event characterizing 47 percent of the American public as "dependent on government" and self-styled "victims. " This disquisition on nearly half of our citizenry dovetails conspicuously with Mr. Romney's cartoon image as a rich businessman who has little idea of how that other half manages to survive.
FEATURES
March 8, 2007
March 8 1965 The United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam, about 3,500 Marines sent to defend the U.S. air base at Da Nang.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | January 18, 2007
Nothing is easier than to second-guess decisions made in wartime. Anyone who has bothered to read the history of wars knows that very few wars have been without disastrous surprises, often on both sides. It is not that the people in charge are stupid. Too many things are unpredictable in war, despite politicians who demand timetables, as if running a war were like running a train. We can now look at the Iraq war with hindsight, as no president or secretary of defense could when making decisions that had to be made.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2006
HONOLULU -- The young airman who escorted reporters from Hickam Air Force Base said his wife, in particular, was excited to see President Bush touch down with Air Force One. "She's from Texas," he explained. "It's like seeing a rock star." The president isn't much of a rock star in the States these days, with his public approval ratings near an all-time low, his party preparing to relinquish control of Congress in January and his administration facing fateful questions about the course of the war in Iraq.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Sneaking into Iraq a sign of weakness On Jan. 9, 1966, the United States mounted a huge infantry assault on North Vietnamese forces in South Vietnam; 8,000 American infantry participated. Our putative ally, the South Vietnamese government, was not informed in advance of this major offensive on its soil, for fear that the plan would be leaked to the enemy. Flash forward 40 years, and we have the spectacle of President Bush sneaking into Baghdad without even informing the so-called prime minister of the "sovereign" state of Iraq in advance ("A surprise visit to Iraq," June 14)
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
Harry S. Freedman, 53, formerly of Pimlico, a decorated Vietnam War fighter pilot who later flew for Eastern Airlines, died Friday of a massive heart attack at his home in Stone Mountain, Ga.Mr. Freedman was born in Baltimore and was a 1959 graduate of City College.As a member of the 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the Screaming Eagles, Mr. Freedman flew scores of missions in F-100 Supersabres over South Vietnam and across the border into Laos in 1966 and 1967 in support of American and South Vietnamese ground troops and bombing Viet Cong and North Vietnamese bases.
NEWS
July 30, 1997
THE ASSOCIATION of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was encouraged into existence by the United States 30 years ago to create a framework of supportive neighbors for South Vietnam. The six members, by no means democracies, were then developing countries, economically and ideologically linked with the West. ASEAN was separate from the military alliance, SEATO.How different today. The original purpose disappeared with South Vietnam. A united Vietnam is both communist and a member. The members are economic tigers, players in world trade.
TOPIC
By Daniel Rapoport and Daniel Rapoport,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Thirty years ago - on April 30, 1975 - North Vietnamese troops marched into Saigon, and the South Vietnamese government surrendered. The last U.S. forces had left South Vietnam two years earlier. Many critics of the Bush administration's Iraq policy see in Vietnam a blueprint for disaster in Iraq where a bloody insurgency continues and political pressures mount for an early American withdrawal. Military planners, however, view that experience as a lesson on how to avoid failure.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | April 29, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Critics of Sen. John Kerry may be barking up the wrong tree when they attack his record in Vietnam, especially when they question whether he deserved the three Purple Hearts he was awarded. The putative Democratic presidential nominee has made his Vietnam service the centerpiece of his political biography, touting his bravery in combat and, most recently, attacking President Bush, "who can't even show or prove that he showed up for duty in the National Guard." But Mr. Kerry's problem isn't whether he deserved the medals he was awarded.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.