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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
It's not even that the terrorists have won, it's that wannabe terrorists have won. A group called Revolution Muslim, which by most accounts seems less a terrorist cell than, metaphorically speaking, a couple of guys living in their parents' basements, managed to scare Comedy Central this week into censoring South Park for mocking their religion, or rather, the ban in some quarters of depictions of the prophet Muhammed. The Anti-Defamation League, which has tracked the New York-based Revolution Muslim, says the group has no more than about a dozen members, is known mainly for spouting anti-Semitism, handing out pamphlets on the sidewalks of New York and picketing mosques that it thinks aren't radical enough.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
"The Book of Mormon" may not be to everyone's taste (I've had pretty spirited correspondence from some folks who took offense), but the mega-musical had no trouble drawing crowds on its first visit to Baltimore. The result turned out to be historic. "Mormon," which features a story and lyrics by Robert Lopez and "South Park" creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker, just broke the house record at the Hippodrome, grossing $1,675,748.25 for the week ending March 9. Breaking house records is something of a religion for this show.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
The marijuana smoke filled the Baltimore rowhouse in a "haze" that "engulfed" the four people sitting around the kitchen table, all of them within arm's reach of the smoldering remains of a "blunt" in an ashtray. One of the men appeared "groovy" and "relaxed" and was "just going with the program." It was, the state's highest court said in a ruling issued Friday, "reminiscent of a scene from a Cheech & Chong movie." Baltimore police had burst into the Lanvale Street rowhouse on Dec. 6, 2006, and arrested the men at the table, including Clavon Smith, who police said also had 15 small bags of marijuana in the pocket of his black leather jacket, which was hanging from the back of a chair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | June 11, 2013
Hardcore college calculus and lab science courses need to be balanced out with a little bit of "South Park" and zombies. Thankfully, Dr. Joshua Joseph Baron at McDaniel has that covered. The 37-year-old, who has been at McDaniel for seven years, teaches such awesome classes as South Park and Contemporary Social Issues and Philosophy of Violent Media. Oh, and Introduction to Philosophy. We're sure the philosophy class is very thorough and interesting, but ... seriously .... where do we sign up for the others.
NEWS
By Barry S. Fagin | April 16, 2000
I CONFESS: I let my kids watch "South Park" on cable television's Comedy Central. Not every episode, mind you. I prescreen them on video before I watch them with the family. But when my face lands on the cover of Negligent Father magazine, that will be the headline: "He Lets His Kids Watch `South Park.' " My kids have taken in four episodes of this foul-mouthed cartoon about life in a "redneck mountain town." My son and daughter have seen the young character Kenny get eaten by rats. They've watched a cute little bear get blown to smithereens and seen a boy toast marshmallows over a burning Vietnam veteran.
FEATURES
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan - They're just as foulmouthed, politically incorrect and crudely drawn here as they are back in the United States. And just as in the United States, that's precisely the appeal of those fish-eyed cartoon kids of TV's "South Park," whose off-color jokes and antics - translated into Mandarin Chinese - have become a surprise hit here among Taiwan's latte-sipping, cynicism-dripping youth. The program's success - it easily wins its time slot late Saturdays - has been a boost for Hong Kong-based StarTV, the Rupert Murdoch-owned cable network that last year bought the rights to air "South Park" in Taiwan.
FEATURES
By James Endrst and James Endrst,HARTFORD COURANT | January 6, 2001
LOS ANGELES - The creators of "South Park" - that adorably rude Comedy Central cartoon - were more anxious than most about Decision/Indecision/Decision 2000. Nothing to do with politics - it's just that without a winner, Trey Parker and Matt Stone were without a leading man for their next series, "Family First." Clearing the debris in their Marina Del Rey office, Parker and Stone say the protracted debate over votes put their show a month behind schedule. Now that a chief executive has been picked, production can begin.
NEWS
April 9, 1998
THE SHOW has been controversial from the start. Many rightly question whether children so young should be watching it. With a cast of pint-sized characters, the show -- strangely, but perhaps predictably -- has become a cult hit among age groups for which it was never intended.We're referring to "Teletubbies," the British show imported by U.S. public television for toddlers but also rated as a favorite among college students overseas.Or, we could be describing "South Park," the profane nighttime cartoon on cable TV about a group of kids, one of whom dies weekly.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
It's a long way from "The Simpsons" to "South Park."A lot has changed since 1989, when the self-appointed guardians of America's youth worried about the impact spiky-haired Bart Simpson would have on youngsters and crusaded against T-shirts shouting "Eat My Shorts" and "Underachiever And Proud Of It."Now, even Bart would be shocked. Four crudely animated third-graders are kicking babies through windows, swearing like pint-sized sailors and breaking wind on demand.Those third-graders are Stan, Kyle, Kenny and Cartman, the perpetually bundled-up representatives of the regressive town of "South Park," the highest-rated series on Comedy Central.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
If anyone has ever wondered what would happen if 8-year-olds with no sense of social convention were given millions of dollars and told to make a movie, along comes "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" to call a definitive halt to the wondering.Not merely content to produce the most consistently puerile half-hour of weekly television, the creators of "South Park" have sprung forth one of the most consistently rude and childish films to hit theaters in quite some time.And, in a subversive, "I can't believe I'm laughing at something so patently offensive" manner, "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" is a sharp piece of social satire that is a hoot to boot.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Police are investigating the discovery of a body found in the woods in Middle Branch Park in South Baltimore. A man's body was found in a wooded area off a trail at about 11:30 a.m., police said. The man appeared to have suffered trauma, and the body will be transported to the medical examiner for further investigation. At the scene, overlooking the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River, officers could be seen talking with a group of young people, with an officer walking one person out of the woods.
NEWS
By Bob Allen | June 11, 2011
SYKESVILLE — The town of Sykesville has obtained a $256,000 state grant for improvements to South Branch Park, which is on land on the south side of Patapsco River that the town leases from Howard County. The grant, which the town applied for in August, is a Maryland Department of Natural Resources Community Parks and Playgrounds grant. "We've had a master plan in place for (developing) South Branch Park for several years," said Ivy Wells, Sykesville's Main Street manager and director of economic development.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
The marijuana smoke filled the Baltimore rowhouse in a "haze" that "engulfed" the four people sitting around the kitchen table, all of them within arm's reach of the smoldering remains of a "blunt" in an ashtray. One of the men appeared "groovy" and "relaxed" and was "just going with the program. " It was, the state's highest court said in a ruling issued Friday, "reminiscent of a scene from a Cheech & Chong movie. " Baltimore police had burst into the Lanvale Street rowhouse on Dec. 6, 2006, and arrested the men at the table, including Clavon Smith, who police said also had 15 small bags of marijuana in the pocket of his black leather jacket, which was hanging from the back of a chair.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
It's not even that the terrorists have won, it's that wannabe terrorists have won. A group called Revolution Muslim, which by most accounts seems less a terrorist cell than, metaphorically speaking, a couple of guys living in their parents' basements, managed to scare Comedy Central this week into censoring South Park for mocking their religion, or rather, the ban in some quarters of depictions of the prophet Muhammed. The Anti-Defamation League, which has tracked the New York-based Revolution Muslim, says the group has no more than about a dozen members, is known mainly for spouting anti-Semitism, handing out pamphlets on the sidewalks of New York and picketing mosques that it thinks aren't radical enough.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | April 10, 2009
'South Park' gets West to wake up South Park may have accomplished the impossible - getting Kanye West to check his ego. The Comedy Central cartoon skewered the rapper Wednesday. West responded Thursday on his blog, saying that the show was funny but that it also hurt his feelings and has helped him realize that maybe he needs to stop saying how great he is. West wrote in typical all-caps: "I JUST WANT TO BE A DOPER PERSON WHICH STARTS WITH ME NOT ALWAYS TELLING PEOPLE HOW DOPE I THINK I AM."
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2008
Cartoons can be destructive. Sarah Russo knew this, but there was something about the way John W. Hodge illustrated the point yesterday that jarred the mother of a kindergartener. Hodge, a nationally known motivational speaker, had just aired excerpts from an episode of the animated series South Park, which follows the lives of four foul-mouthed third-graders in a small Colorado town. In the episode, the boys mock a school counselor's anti-drug lecture and get him fired. Later, the counselor, homeless and depressed, slips into drug use and casual sex. "Ten-, 11-, 12-year-olds are watching this," Hodge said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 4, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.SOS (edited), Rihanna 2.Bad Day, Daniel Powter 3.What's Left of Me, Nick Lachey 4.Temperature, Sean Paul 5.Dani California, Red Hot Chili Peppers [Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.We Shall Overcome - The Seeger Sessions, Bruce Springsteen 2.Let Love In, Goo Goo Dolls 3.All the Roadrunning, Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris 4.A Girl Like Me (bonus tracks), Rihanna 5.IV, Godsmack [Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded videos 1.Drug Testing, The Office 2.A Million Little Fibers, South Park 3.S.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2007
Downloaded singles 1.Glamorous, Fergie 2.Don't Matter, Akon 3.Girlfriend, Avril Lavigne 4.This Is Why I'm Hot, Mims 5.Cupid's Chokehold, Gym Class Heroes featuring Patrick Stump [ITUNES (MARCH 19)] Downloaded albums 1.Back to Black, Amy Winehouse 2.Undiscovered, James Morrison 3.Neon Bible, Arcade Fire 4.Live at Massey Hall 1971, Neil Young 5.Daughtry (bonus track), Daughtry [ITUNES (MARCH 19)] Downloaded TV episodes 1.Par Avion, Lost 2.Scars and Souvenirs, Grey's Anatomy 3.Cartman [Expletive]
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