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South Pacific

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
The songs from "South Pacific" have been practically embedded in the DNA of many Americans for a long time. So it's all the more remarkable that the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical about love, loss and gain amid World War II did not get an all-out revival on Broadway until nearly 60 years after its premiere. That 2008 revival, directed by Bartlett Sher at the Lincoln Center Theater, simultaneously honored the 1949 original and made both the book and the music freshly compelling. With a superb cast, evocative design and a luxury-size orchestra in the pit, the production seemed too good to be true.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
A total solar eclipse will occur over parts of northern Australia and the southern Pacific Ocean on Tuesday, and you can watch it from Maryland via a webcast. The eclipse begins at about 3:35 p.m. EST, with its path starting in  Australia's Garig Ganak Barlu National Park in the Northern Territory. The instant of greatest eclipse will be reached at about 5:12 p.m. EST. The eclipse path ends at 6:48 p.m. EDT just west of Chile. While it won't be visible to many populated areas of the globe, an official broadcast is being done from Cairns, Australia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Vincent J. Leone, a former Locust Point cafe owner who with his two brothers sponsored notable amateur baseball teams, died Saturday at Genesis HealthCare Spa Creek Center in Annapolis, where he had been recuperating from a fall. The former longtime Brooklyn Park resident, who had recently moved to Kent Island, was 91. Vincent John Leone, the son of a construction company owner and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and spent his early years on Walbrook Avenue before moving to South Baltimore with his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
"South Pacific," the 1949 musical by Rodgers & Hammerstein, enjoyed the distinction not only of being one of the most successful shows on Broadway — nearly 2,000 performances, numerous hit songs, several Tony Awards, the Pulitzer Prize — but also one of the hardest to revive there. The first full-fledged revival didn't come along until 2008, but the wait was worth it. That production by the Lincoln Center Theater proved to be a revelation. Without the slightest trace of superficiality or trendy deconstruction, this "South Pacific" reconfirmed all of the strengths in the original, including the head-on examination of racial prejudice that was so far ahead of its time, and effectively minimized its occasional weaknesses.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1996
There are some things to like about the "South Pacific" playing at the Chesapeake Music Hall through Sept. 1, but problems of casting and execution make this presentation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic much less of an "enchanted evening" than it ought to be.Alas, the scenes come and go without any real sense of occasion, either in cumulative impact or in the numerous "big moments" that dot both the book and the score.A major problem is the casting of Cynthia Lasner as Ensign Nellie Forbush, for this attractive young actress is simply not up to the demands of the starring role.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1995
The miraculous score remains intact, but otherwise Rodgers and Hammerstein aficionados might have a bit of trouble recognizing "South Pacific" as brought off by the Naval Academy Glee Club.The classic tale of tragedy and love set during the war against Japan has become a show within a show in its Mahan Hall incarnation, staged this year to celebrate the academy's 150th anniversary and the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.The audience is welcomed on board the USS Monterey, a light carrier that served with distinction in the Pacific theater during the war. The show is presented on the carrier's main deck by a touring USO company brought aboard in the waning days of the war.Whoops and hollers from the "crew," sailors jumping off balconies, and frequent announcements of incoming Japanese aircraft punctuate the proceedings with great frequency.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 4, 2004
IF YOUR IDEA of a big adventure is a ride across town to look at wicker furniture, you won't know what to make of Don Chiarello's story. Four years ago, at the age of 60, Chiarello dropped out of the rat race for good. He quit his law practice in Towson. Sold his house in Federal Hill. Sold the furniture. Sold his Nissan 200 SX. But Chiarello didn't exactly head off to spend his golden years playing golf and hanging around the Waffle House for the free drink refills. No, he bought a 68-foot schooner called the Attua in New Zealand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 11, 1990
Simon Says:Does anyone still wear a nightcap? Not drink one, wear one.*People will eat Neapolitan ice cream, but it's nobody's favorite.*Because of his entirely adequate but somewhat unexciting victory margin on Tuesday, William Donald Schaefer may have to seek another office after he leaves the governorship just to show he can still crush those who dare to run against him.*You can have "Les Miserables" and "Phantom of the Opera." For a musical that makes you leave the theater singing the songs, you still can't beat "South Pacific."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
A total solar eclipse will occur over parts of northern Australia and the southern Pacific Ocean on Tuesday, and you can watch it from Maryland via a webcast. The eclipse begins at about 3:35 p.m. EST, with its path starting in  Australia's Garig Ganak Barlu National Park in the Northern Territory. The instant of greatest eclipse will be reached at about 5:12 p.m. EST. The eclipse path ends at 6:48 p.m. EDT just west of Chile. While it won't be visible to many populated areas of the globe, an official broadcast is being done from Cairns, Australia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Sisto Joseph Averno Sr., a guard who played on the Baltimore Colts in the 1950s and went on to sell Chevrolets for 57 years, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at Northwest Hospital. He was 86 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Paterson, N.J., he was the son of Roberto Averno and Elvira Isabella Salerno. While a student at Paterson High School, he played football and was scouted by colleges. He won athletic scholarships, but he forged a birth certificate so he could enlist in the Navy during World War II. He was assigned to the South Pacific and served as a gunner's mate aboard a destroyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | December 18, 2011
“Loyalties Will Be Broken” …just like they've been broken every single season since Sue called Kelly a snake.   We begin the final episode of "Survivor: South Pacific," and I still don't know whom I'm rooting for. Y'all know I love Rick, but, realistically, I don't think he has a chance of making it to the final two. If Coach wins, I can accept it, but I'm still not going to actively root for him. Sophie, maybe? OK, I admit I wrote that bit before the episode began, but now it has, and I'm wondering why Anderson Cooper is talking about coral reefs on my TV right now -- is this part of the finale?
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | February 13, 2008
"Broadway in Annapolis," a decade-long tradition of the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra, hit a new high last weekend with its production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific. Music Director J. Ernest Green initially encountered scheduling hurdles in bringing the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical to Maryland Hall's stage, but its arrival was worth the wait: The production excelled in terms of quality musicianship, dramatic storytelling, clever staging, skilled acting and, above all, a dream cast.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 26, 2001
Glenn Close seems a little too tenured to be Nellie Forbush. Rade Sherbedgia doesn't radiate much sensual electricity as Emile de Becque. The passion you are supposed to feel when the two are in each other's company is mainly missing in action. Then there's Harry Connick Jr., as Marine Lt. Joseph Cable. Let's just say he's a lot closer to the young Frank Sintra as a singer than as an actor. And let's not even talk about what they've done to some of the marvelous songs of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, dropping one altogether ("Happy Talk")
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