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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2004
MOSCOW - Separatist tensions flared in the Republic of Georgia yesterday, with violence reported in South Ossetia a day after President Mikhail Saakashvili threatened to sink ships approaching the country's other separatist region, Abkhazia. The threat to ships in the Black Sea, including those ferrying Russian passengers, prompted pointed warnings from Russian officials, including Foreign Minister Sergei B. Ivanov, who said that Saakashvili's threat, if carried out, would amount to piracy.
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NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | October 9, 2008
MOSCOW - Russian troops dismantled checkpoints and decamped from Georgia proper yesterday, abandoning a two-month occupation of broad swaths of the smaller former Soviet republic and pushing the festering conflict to a new status quo. The withdrawal brings a measure of relief, but sheds little light on the bitter dispute over the future of Georgia's two breakaway republics, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Russia plans to leave thousands of troops stationed in the rebel regions, which Moscow has recognized as independent states and whose residents hold Russian passports.
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NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 14, 2006
TSKHINVALI, Georgia -- The separatist government in this crumbling war-scarred city at the foot of the Caucasus Mountains has its own flag, anthem, president and prime minister - and little else. Most of the economy in South Ossetia, of which Tskhinvali is the capital, vanished two years ago when Georgian troops shut down a large open-air market that they insisted was a haven for smuggling. Buildings half-destroyed in the region's 1991 war with Georgia have never been rebuilt. People scrape by on $50 a month or less.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 16, 2008
TBILISI, Georgia - A new front has opened between Georgia and Russia, this one over which side was the aggressor whose military activities early last month ignited the lopsided five-day war. At issue is new inconclusive intelligence that paints a more complicated picture of the critical last hours before war broke out. Georgia has released intercepted telephone calls purporting to show that part of a Russian armored regiment crossed into South Ossetia...
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | October 9, 2008
MOSCOW - Russian troops dismantled checkpoints and decamped from Georgia proper yesterday, abandoning a two-month occupation of broad swaths of the smaller former Soviet republic and pushing the festering conflict to a new status quo. The withdrawal brings a measure of relief, but sheds little light on the bitter dispute over the future of Georgia's two breakaway republics, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Russia plans to leave thousands of troops stationed in the rebel regions, which Moscow has recognized as independent states and whose residents hold Russian passports.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 16, 2008
TBILISI, Georgia - A new front has opened between Georgia and Russia, this one over which side was the aggressor whose military activities early last month ignited the lopsided five-day war. At issue is new inconclusive intelligence that paints a more complicated picture of the critical last hours before war broke out. Georgia has released intercepted telephone calls purporting to show that part of a Russian armored regiment crossed into South Ossetia...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 2008
TBILISI, Georgia - Russia expanded its attacks on Georgia yesterday, moving tanks and troops through the separatist enclave of South Ossetia and advancing toward the city of Gori in central Georgia, in its first direct assault on a Georgian city with ground forces after three days of heavy fighting, Georgian officials said. The maneuver - along with aerial bombing of the Georgian capital, Tbilisi - suggested that Russia's aims in the conflict had gone beyond securing the pro-Russian enclaves of South Ossetia and Abkhazia to weakening the armed forces of Georgia, a former Soviet republic and an ally of the United States whose Western leanings have long annoyed the Kremlin.
NEWS
August 13, 2008
The foot soldiers in Georgia's Rose Revolution gathered by the thousands yesterday in the beleaguered capital, waving the red and white flag of their nation. It was a courageous display in the face of Russia's punishing response to Georgia's attack last week on the separatist enclave of South Ossetia. The demonstrators' message was emphatic - an independent Georgia - and ensuring the country's sovereignty should be at the center of any agreement to end the conflict between Moscow and Tbilisi.
NEWS
August 12, 2008
Russian tanks and soldiers don't have to reach the capital of Georgia to break the government of President Mikhail Saakashvili. Their two-pronged assault on the former Soviet republic and relentless drive to evict Georgian troops from the separatist provinces of South Ossetia and Abkhazia have proved Mr. Saakashvili's vulnerability at home and abroad. Mr. Saakashvili badly underestimated Russia's reaction to his government's moves against the neighboring separatists and the West's ability to protect him from an invasion.
NEWS
By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas | August 14, 2008
For the coolest composure while going to war, the gold medal goes to Vladimir V. Putin. The Russian prime minister maintained his characteristic calm during Friday's Olympic opening ceremony in Beijing - giving a firm salute to the Russian athletes marching by - while he arranged for another kind of march into the disputed territory of South Ossetia. It's clear that Mr. Putin considers this payback time, not only for Georgia, Russia's meddlesome neighbor to the south, but also for President Bush.
NEWS
By FROM BALTIMORE SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 9, 2008
Three British Muslims guilty in bombing plot LONDON: Three British Muslims with ties to Pakistan were found guilty yesterday of conspiracy to murder in a terrorist bombing campaign, but jurors failed to reach a verdict on whether they plotted to blow up multiple trans-Atlantic airliners with liquid explosives disguised as soft drinks. Last month, government prosecutors failed to convict three other men of helping to plan the deadly London transit bombings of 2005 - the worst attack on Britain's capital since World War II. In yesterday's decision, Abdulla Ahmed Ali and co-conspirators Assad Sarwar and Tanvir Hussain were convicted of trying to make a bomb out of hydrogen peroxide.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Paul Richter and James Gerstenzang and Paul Richter,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2008
WASHINGTON - Offering new support for Georgia after its losing military clash with Russia last month, President Bush said yesterday that the United States would provide up to $1 billion in assistance to the beleaguered Caucasus nation. But by including no money for Georgia's military, the White House appeared to be trying to avoid irritating Moscow while the region remains tense. Although administration officials said they are considering rearming the Georgians, funds in the two-year package announced yesterday are reserved for economic and humanitarian assistance.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2008
MOSCOW - Russia plans to establish a long-term presence inside Georgia and one of its breakaway republics by adding 18 checkpoints, including at least eight within undisputed Georgian territory outside the pro-Russian enclave of South Ossetia, a ranking Russian military official told reporters yesterday. The checkpoints will be staffed by hundreds of Russian troops, the official said, with those in Georgia proper having supplies ferried to them from breakaway South Ossetia. If implemented, the plan would effectively put under Russian control the border between Georgia and the South Ossetia region, which is seeking independence, as well as a small chunk of Georgia proper.
NEWS
By RON SMITH | August 20, 2008
Nicholas Carr thinks that Google is making us "stoopid." In a recent piece in The Atlantic, he says those of us who constantly surf the Net can't concentrate properly anymore - that instant access to virtually all information reduces our attention span. Mr. Carr says he can no longer immerse himself in a book or a long article, something that used to be easy for him. Has this happened to you? I thought so. It's happened to me as well. Mr. Carr points to research that suggests we may be in the middle of neurological changes in the way we read and think.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | August 17, 2008
IGOETI, Georgia - Even as Russia signed a cease-fire agreement with Georgia yesterday, its troops destroyed a key railroad bridge that links the Caucasus region to the Black Sea coast, effectively cutting off east-west transportation routes through the country, the Georgian Foreign Ministry announced. Russia denied blowing up the bridge, calling the charge "another unverified allegation" in the wake of large-scale fighting over a pro-Moscow separatist republic. A Los Angeles Times photographer traveling in the area yesterday saw explosives attached to the underside of a nearby railroad bridge, but it was still intact.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | August 14, 2008
WASHINGTON - In the early 1990s, the United States began beefing up Georgia's army as the tiny republic gained its independence from the collapsing Soviet Union - an effort accelerated after 9/11 in what President Bush said was a fight against al-Qaida. That "train and equip" program is part of a growing, global American initiative to bolster military forces in such unlikely and unstable places as Ethiopia. Chad, Albania, Kazakhstan, Sri Lanka, Lebanon and Yemen. Cease-fire Russian military reportedly violates truce.
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