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By Lani Harac and Lani Harac,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
Police have identified the three people who died last weekend when their plane crashed on a mountain at the Washington-Frederick county line as a husband and wife and family friend from Anne Arundel County. Thomas E. Stone Sr., 57, of Crownsville was piloting the plane on the way back from a five-day vacation in Indiana when it crashed on South Mountain, the highest point in the area, authorities said. Stone, his wife, Donna Stone, 53, and Andrew Barone, 54, of Severn were killed. Investigators have not determined the cause of the crash.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
As of 9 a.m. Tuesday, traffic was slow on I-95 southbound near Mountain Road, due to an accident involving two vehicles. Accidents were slowing traffic on I-83 south near Mount Carmel Road in Baltimore County and Goucher Boulevard and Taylor Avenue in Baltimore County. A water main break was causing icy road conditions near Monumental Avenue and Hammonds Ferry Road in Baltimore County. There were no major delays reported on Baltimore area transit systems.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Standing behind the old brick Worthington House, visitors can look down the gently sloping hillside and picture the Civil War battle that likely saved the nation's capital from capture. Much of the farmland where Union soldiers fought that hot summer day in 1864 to delay a Confederate attack on Washington has been preserved as Monocacy National Battlefield. But the view from the Worthington farm, where the fighting began, appears fated to become less historic. A huge waste-to-energy plant is planned just across the Monocacy River from the 1,650-acre park — a project that has sparked criticism as the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the war. One hundred fifty feet tall, with a 270-foot smokestack, the facility will loom over the trees that hide areas where Confederate cavalry forded the river to assault Union infantry.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Standing behind the old brick Worthington House, visitors can look down the gently sloping hillside and picture the Civil War battle that likely saved the nation's capital from capture. Much of the farmland where Union soldiers fought that hot summer day in 1864 to delay a Confederate attack on Washington has been preserved as Monocacy National Battlefield. But the view from the Worthington farm, where the fighting began, appears fated to become less historic. A huge waste-to-energy plant is planned just across the Monocacy River from the 1,650-acre park — a project that has sparked criticism as the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the war. One hundred fifty feet tall, with a 270-foot smokestack, the facility will loom over the trees that hide areas where Confederate cavalry forded the river to assault Union infantry.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
MIDDLETOWN -- The granite pillar on South Mountain is modest, as battle monuments go. No charging steeds, no heroic figures with swords. Just a simple 8-foot obelisk marking where a Union general was killed during an overlooked clash in the Civil War.On this "wild and lonely mountain," as one soldier described it, the tide shifted Sept. 14, 1862, in the fratricidal conflict, which nearly destroyed the nation. Union troops, who had known little but defeat and frustration until then, stopped the South's first invasion of the North in its tracks.
NEWS
August 25, 2002
A correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing of this battle near Hagerstown, Md., says: General Reno was killed while reconnoitering in the woods to the left of our batteries. A rebel sharpshooter shot him dead instantly. General Garland, who was in command of a North Carolina brigade, was instantly killed by one of our shells, which struck him on the head. The rebels were driven at every assault and a complete victory was gained. Our loss was computed to be from 1,100 to 1,200 in killed and wounded; the enemy's is thought to be much greater, and thousands of their men have been taken prisoners.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
TURNER'S GAP -- Just over the ridge, a stone wall -- which a brigade of Alabamians used for cover as a division of Pennsylvanians advanced on them during the Battle of South Mountain -- has become a facade of an imposing brick house overlooking the Middleton Valley. To the east, a rocky field -- where the Union I Corps won its nickname, "The Iron Brigade," as it assaulted Confederate positions at Fox's Gap -- was on the verge of becoming a subdivision a few years ago until Central Maryland Heritage League scraped together the money to buy it. Now, a bill to establish a state park at the South Mountain Civil War Battlefield and make it easier to protect much of the remaining land that hasn't been developed is making its way through the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1997
BURKITTSVILLE -- Some of the state's most hallowed ground, where thousands fell in the second-bloodiest battle ever fought on Maryland soil, will be given permanent protection from the developer's bulldozer today.The Board of Public Works is scheduled to ratify two contracts purchasing the development rights to farmland at the site of the Battle of South Mountain, where Union forces under Maj. Gen. George McClellan clashed with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia on Sept. 14, 1862.By securing agricultural easements on the two properties, totaling 338 acres, the state will bring the amount of South Mountain property protected under its Program Open Space to more 1,000 acres.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
This weekend at Boonsboro, about 1,500 Civil War buffs will re-enact the 1862 Battle of South Mountain.Although South Mountain was the first major clash of the Civil War on Maryland soil, it was quickly relegated to a historical footnote by the fierce struggle at Antietam, three days later. Despite its quick exit from the spotlight, South Mountain was a significant battle.In the summer of 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was at full flower, having defeated Union forces in a series of defensive struggles in Northern Virginia, culminating in the second battle of Bull Run in August.
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
As the fighting raged at Harper's Ferry, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan sought to relieve the embattled garrison there by forcing his way through the Confederate screen at Crampton's Gap on South Mountain, splitting Gen. Robert E. Lee's invading army north of the Potomac in the process. Union Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin's 6th Corps arrived at the pass about noon Sept. 14, finding it lightly defended by cavalry pickets from Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's division and infantry from Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' division.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
The State Highway Administration reopened its long-closed South Mountain rest stops along Interstate 70 near the Frederick- Washington County line this week after an $18.3 million renovation project. The agency opened a section of the eastbound and westbound rest stops after expanding the parking area and updating restroom facilities. The stops, between Exits 35 and 42 in Frederick County, have been provided with walking trails, picnic areas, parking and restrooms that comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act. According to the SHA, the reopened rest stops each have 76 parking spaces for passenger vehicles, 26 parking spaces for commercial trucks and six parking spaces for RVs and buses.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Anne Arundel County School Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell has presented the school board with plans to redistrict schools in the South County and Mountain Road areas of the county, attempting to disrupt as few community schools as possible and remedy many of the area's overcrowding issues using magnet schools. Maxwell's recommendations for the South County closely mirror those of a committee made up of community leaders and parents who studied the issue there. However, Maxwell largely veered from the panel's recommendations for the Mountain Road corridor, choosing to keep most students in their current home districts and feeder system, with hopes that he can solve some of the area's space problems with magnet schools and programs that would attract voluntary student transfers.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
MIDDLETOWN - Randy Sowers and his family are turning back the pages of history in an attempt to save their 200-acre dairy farm a few miles outside this Frederick County town. In a throwback to what some would call the good old days, a time when country folk never locked their doors, the Sowers family offers farm-fresh milk delivered to the doorsteps of about 1,600 homes in six Maryland counties, Washington and parts of Virginia. According to Ted Elkin, chief of the division of milk control at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Sowerses' South Mountain Creamery is the only licensed dairy operation in the state providing home delivery of milk.
NEWS
August 25, 2002
A correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing of this battle near Hagerstown, Md., says: General Reno was killed while reconnoitering in the woods to the left of our batteries. A rebel sharpshooter shot him dead instantly. General Garland, who was in command of a North Carolina brigade, was instantly killed by one of our shells, which struck him on the head. The rebels were driven at every assault and a complete victory was gained. Our loss was computed to be from 1,100 to 1,200 in killed and wounded; the enemy's is thought to be much greater, and thousands of their men have been taken prisoners.
NEWS
By Anna Katherine Yost and Anna Katherine Yost,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
On the morning of Sept. 13, 1862, men of the 27th Indiana Infantry stumbled upon a crucial document on the ground just south of Frederick. Gen. Robert E. Lee's "lost order," wrapped around three cigars, was now in the possession of the Army of the Potomac. That fair Saturday morn found troops of the Union 12th Corps bivouacked outside Frederick on a site previously occupied by Confederates under Maj. Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill. Sgt. John M. Bloss noticed the yellowish package: a bundle of fragrant cigars bound with a Confederate order.
NEWS
By Moira Curran and Moira Curran,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
"I could see dimly through the dense sulphurous battle smoke, and a line from Shakespeare's Tempest filtered through my brain: `Hell is empty and all the devils are here.'" Such was the scene, as described by Pvt. Frederick Foard, of the 20th North Carolina Infantry, at Turner's Gap, on South Mountain that Sept. 14, 1862. From the early morning until long after sunset, the fighting there involved skirmishes and repeated attacks, through which neither side could gain a true advantage. The struggle at Turner's Gap, within the larger Battle of South Mountain, resulted in a victory for the Union army, which suffered far fewer casualties than its enemy.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 3, 1999
O'Malley will be the nation's most exciting new young mayor since Schmoke.Let's blame air crashes on terrorism, because that only happens to someone else. If the trouble is in the plane, more passengers are at risk.South Mountain will be preserved as a Civil War battlefield and scary witch place.China's Communist bosses cannot beat Falun Gong, so they might just as well join it.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 9, 1999
Battle of South MountainStep back in time to the Civil War and experience the Battle of South Mountain this weekend in Boonsboro. Several thousand Union and Confederate Civil War re-enactors take part in commemoration of the Battle of South Mountain of Sept. 14, 1862, which preceded the bloody Battle of Antietam by three days. Also featured are cavalry, sutlers, artillery, troop camps, medical demonstrations, period civilians, food and a dramatic 21-gun evening cannonade, "Fire on the Mountain."
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
As the fighting raged at Harper's Ferry, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan sought to relieve the embattled garrison there by forcing his way through the Confederate screen at Crampton's Gap on South Mountain, splitting Gen. Robert E. Lee's invading army north of the Potomac in the process. Union Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin's 6th Corps arrived at the pass about noon Sept. 14, finding it lightly defended by cavalry pickets from Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's division and infantry from Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' division.
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