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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
Twenty-four middle-schoolers from South Korea are in Howard County this month trying to improve their English and learn more about American culture during the fourth annual Summer Cultural Exchange Program. The students have been taking rigorous classes at Bonnie Branch Middle School, where they spend five days a week in a five-hour English for Speakers of Other Languages, or ESOL, class. They work on reading, writing, listening and pronunciation. Korean is not spoken in the class. This year there has been more of an emphasis on writing.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Under Armour might start collaborating with smartphone maker Samsung Electronics Co. on wearable fitness devices, according to a South Korean news report. Yonhap News Agency cited market sources in a Wednesday report that said the de facto heir of the South Korean Samsung Group, Lee Jay-yong, met with Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank this month in Seoul. The two business leaders "reportedly discussed ways of countering impact from collaboration between Apple Inc. and Nike Inc. in the wearable devices sector," Yonhap News said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- What appeared last week to be a low-level spying incident between the United States and South Korea has grown into a more serious case, with prosecutors saying yesterday that they would charge a U.S. intelligence analyst with espionage, an accusation reserved for highly damaging breaches of national security.Freshly declassified documents in the case also show that the analyst, Robert C. Kim, who is accused of supplying classified documents to the South Korean Embassy here, attracted the attention of senior military officials in Seoul, South Korea.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly,The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Suk-min Yoon, the Orioles' free-agent right-hander from South Korea who appeared in two Grapefruit League games after securing his work visa earlier this month, pitched four innings in the Orioles' 4-3 win Saturday against their Triple-A affiliate, the Norfolk Tides. The game was canceled because of persistent rain after the Orioles batted in the top of the sixth. The 27-year Yoon, who has already been sent down to Triple-A and added to Norfolk's rotation, pitched against the Tides lineup and allowed four hits and two runs while walking none and striking out two. He faced the minimum number of batters in three of his innings, but allowed three hits and two runs in the third, which ended with two outs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
BEIJING -- President Roh Tae Woo of South Korea arrived in China yesterday for the first state visit between two one-time enemies, and he quickly made it clear that he hoped to use Beijing to help overcome the most bitter legacy of the Cold War in North Asia, the division of the Korean peninsula.Mr. Roh landed here yesterday afternoon with an entourage of nearly 500 government officials, business leaders and journalists for what is regarded as a landmark in creating a new order in the region.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - After a day's delay, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung flew into enemy territory this morning for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in hopes of bringing peace to the Korean Peninsula after more than a half century of hatred. About 180 South Korean officials were to join Kim on the 108-mile flight from Seoul to Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. The two leaders were scheduled to hold at least two meetings and attend a pair of banquets. Kim is scheduled to return Thursday, driving across the Demilitarized Zone at Panmunjom, where the north and south signed an armistice in 1953, halting the Korean War. The summit is the first between the leaders of the divided peninsula since it split at the end of World War II. Analysts and South Korean officials say the meetings are unlikely to lead to any breakthroughs, but see the summit as a hopeful first step towards reconciling the Cold War rivals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea's top strategist for North Korea, Lim Dong Won, returned here yesterday from a two-day mission to Pyongyang after failing to obtain a crucial appointment with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Il. Lim, who has engineered South Korea's so-called sunshine policy of reconciliation with the North on behalf of President Kim Dae Jung, said it might have been the last chance under Kim Dae Jung's presidency to resolve the nuclear crisis....
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
Byung Joon Chun, 69, spent almost all his life in Kwangju, South Korea -- hometown of Kim Dae Jung, the newly elected president of South Korea, and the scene of the notorious 1980 massacre by the military regime that Kim risked his life to oppose.So when Chun, now living in Baltimore, heard about Kim's victory in the South Korean election yesterday, he was elated."I think Kim is like Mandela from Africa," Chun said through an interpreter. "The people respect him the same way in Kwangju. He's smart, and he has done so many things for Koreans; he's fought for the Koreans."
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2003
TAESONG-RI, South Korea - At first glance, the farm looks like a painter's vision of a bucolic idyll, the hills scored with rows of apple trees and the meadows daubed with purple wildflowers. But a closer look reveals that something is rotten in the fields. Decomposing into the rich soil are turnips and cabbages that nobody bothered to pick because prices are too low to be worth the time or gasoline to transport the produce to market. This 80-acre farm once belonged to Lee Kyung Hae. The 56-year-old South Korean farmer and activist plunged a knife into his chest last week at the World Trade Organization conference in Cancun, Mexico, to protest efforts to further open agricultural markets to competition.
NEWS
By Norman Solomon | August 2, 1998
On Capitol Hill one day in late February 1995, a subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific heard testimony from Edwin J. Feulner Jr., the president of the Heritage Foundation. The witness praised South Korea as a key ally of the United States and urged closer cooperation between Washington and Seoul. And he criticized the Clinton administration for being too conciliatory toward the regime in North Korea.Feulner's testimony was unremarkable, except that it did not mention a pertinent fact: His organization was in the midst of receiving large amounts of money from the South Korean government.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- South Korean right-hander Suk-min Yoon has yet to pitch in a Grapefruit League game and likely won't until late next week at the earliest. Yoon is slated to spend most of next week in Canada obtaining his work visa. He will fly to Ottawa on Sunday and has an interview appointment on Monday morning. That process is expected to take a few days, but it beats the alternative of Yoon traveling back to South Korea to get his visa - which would involve lengthy travel and missing extended time in camp.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - The Orioles introduced South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon to the media on Tuesday afternoon at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex. Yoon was flanked  by Orioles manager Buck Showalter, executive vice president Dan Duquette and his agent Tad Yo, who served as his interpreter. Here is a transcript of what Yoon had to say: On how familiar he is with the Orioles: “I know about Cal Ripken, Jr. having the longest per game streak, continuously. I knows about that.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Suk-min Yoon spent his childhood in South Korea idolizing fellow countryman Chan Ho Park as he became the first South Korean-born player to pitch the major leagues, all while hoping that one day he could follow in Park's footsteps. The 27-year-old right-hander's dream got closer to reality Tuesday, when the Orioles formally introduced him to the media, making Yoon the first player in franchise history to be born in South Korea. "I worked hard to get to that goal, and now that I'm here," Yoon said through agent Tad Hun Yo, who also served as an interpreter.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- On the eve of the first workout for pitchers and catchers this spring, the Orioles once again traveled an international route Thursday in an attempt to improve their pitching staff, agreeing to terms with South Korean right-handed pitcher Suk-min Yoon on a three-year deal, according to an industry source. The Orioles' agreement with the 27-year-old is worth $5.575 million guaranteed over the three years and is pending a club physical, the source said. The Orioles have not officially announced the deal.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
As we lead up to tonight's All-Star Game, here are some Orioles odds and ends: -- ESPN's television broadcast of last night's Home Run Derby receieved a 5.0 overnight rating, which is up six percent from last year's broadcast. In Baltimore, the broadcast received a 9.0 rating, which was up 137 percent locally from 2012. Baltimore was the third highest-rated market in the nation behind Detroit (9.8) and Pittsburgh (9.6). -- Online sportsbook Bovada is giving Orioles first baseman Chris Davis 14-to-1 odds of being named the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player tonight.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The Orioles have signed South Korean left-hander Jung-Hyun Yoon, the organization's first signing in South Korea since last year's failed signing of 17-year-old high-school pitcher Seong-Min Kim. The 21-year-old Yoon most recently pitched collegiately at Dongguk University in Seoul, South Korea. The Orioles like his smooth delivery and the fact that he owns a solid curveball with significant upside. Yoon will report to the Orioles spring training complex in Sarasota to begin working out and then be re-evaluated before being assigned within the minor league system.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
A 20-year-old Columbia-based company has accused the world's largest model train producer of using stolen designs to develop and sell model steam engines. In a lawsuit filed this month in U.S. District Court here, Mike's Train House Inc. of Columbia claims that Michigan-based Lionel LLC sold trains made from designs stolen from Mike's Train House's manufacturer in South Korea. The lawsuit also says Lionel used production schedules stolen from the South Korean manufacturer. "We are not claiming that Lionel stole those designs," said Charles J. Bloom, the attorney representing Mike's Train House.
NEWS
September 11, 1996
THE EDITORIAL Aug. 27 commenting on the verdicts recently delivered to former South Korean presidents Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo invites comment on two points.First, it opens discussion via comparison with the case of South Africa, asserting that the Mandela government managed to achieve a degree of ''reconciliation'' with the country's former white oppressors.In South Korea, former presidents Chun and Roh were found guilty of treason and mutiny, corruption and huge abuses of power, all of which demand justice.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina | June 12, 2012
South Korean teenager Seong-Min Kim, the left-handed pitcher who sparked controversy in his native country when he first tried to sign with the Orioles, remains unsigned and his now back in his home country.   Kim signed a minor-league contract with the Orioles that included a $500,000 signing bonus in the offseason, but the commissioner's office chose not to approve the deal in February, saying the club did not go through the proper procedures - specifically conducting a status check of Kim's eligibility with the Korean Baseball Organization.
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