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NEWS
January 27, 2010
North and South Korea exchanged artillery fire along their disputed western sea border today, two days after the North designated no-sail zones in the area, the military and news reports said. North Korea fired several rounds of land-based artillery off its coast, an officer at the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Seoul said. The officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said no casualities or damage were immediately reported. South Korea, in response, immediately fired warning shots from a marine base on an island near the sea border, according to Seoul's Yonhap news agency.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Germany and Ghana played to a thrilling 2-2 draw, leading me and many others to wonder whether this means the U.S., which played poorly and still beat Ghana 2-1, is better than I thought, or whether Portugal, who was smoked 4-0 by Germany, is just really bad. What's on tap: Belgium vs. Russia, 12 p.m., ABC; South Korea vs. Algeria, 3 p.m., ABC; United States vs. Portugal, 6 p.m, ESPN. What you'll see: You may understand why I'm particularly concerned with results that directly affect the U.S., which controls its own destiny in the Group of Death.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet with the mayor of Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday to announce an agreement to increase the business relationship between the two places, his office said this afternoon. O'Malley and Oh Se-hoon will sign a memorandum of understanding that will outline efforts to increase investment and trade opportunities between Maryland and Seoul. The two places are particularly interested in increasing investments in science and technology development, O'Malley's office said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- South Korean right-hander Suk-min Yoon has yet to pitch in a Grapefruit League game and likely won't until late next week at the earliest. Yoon is slated to spend most of next week in Canada obtaining his work visa. He will fly to Ottawa on Sunday and has an interview appointment on Monday morning. That process is expected to take a few days, but it beats the alternative of Yoon traveling back to South Korea to get his visa - which would involve lengthy travel and missing extended time in camp.
NEWS
April 13, 1992
The political deal between South Korea's President Roh Tae Woo and centrist opposition leader Kim Young Sam, two years ago, was supposed to isolate the remaining opposition. It did not work. In elections for the National Assembly last month, Korean voters reduced the governing Democratic Liberal Party from 215 seats out of 299 to only 149. That is not a majority.The government was able to pick up two independents for a one-vote margin. But there is a Perils of Pauline aspect about such arrangements.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea - President Kim Dae Jung endorses the decision by the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization to cut off shipments of heavy oil to North Korea beginning next month if the North fails to take steps to dismantle its nuclear weapons program, a senior official said yesterday. The official said that Kim was consulted on negotiations among South Korean, Japanese and American officials and that he recognized the need for a strong position despite his previous pleas for dialogue rather than tough action that might upset efforts toward reconciliation between North and South Korea.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | September 23, 1991
Seoul, South Korea -- WHEN COMMUNISM was at its militant heights in the 1920s, Lincoln Steffens went to Russia and wrote euphorically the famous words, "I have seen the future, and it works." Robert LaFollette corrected him; the Wisconsin politician looked at America and said, "No, the future is here."Today, we might say of a collapsing communist empire, "We have seen the future, and it is the past." And here in little South Korea, ignored and vilified by the world for years, it is today clear that, yes, "the future is here."
NEWS
By GEORGIE ANNE GEYER JTC | July 19, 1995
Seoul, South Korea -- WHEN THE POSH, pink "modern" Sampoong Department Store here simply collapsed on June 29, newspaper columnists noted in the midst of the sorrow that shook this little nation that the store's name meant in Korean "abundant things."And there you have the tragic irony of the "accident" that is thought to have killed at least 400 people. This nation, which has known almost nothing but 1,000 years of defeat, has become, incredibly, the 12th richest country on Earth. The founder of Korea's mammoth Hyundai conglomerate was just named one of the world's 10 richest men, but the country itself seems to be falling down around the heads of these hard-working people.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | August 24, 1992
BEIJING -- In 1990, when China played host to the Asian Games only a year after the Tiananmen Square massacre, its most evident outside supporter was South Korea -- a nation with which Beijing had no formal ties.South Korea donated 201 Hyundai cars and electronic-surveillance equipment for use by China during the two-week, regional sports meet. Advertising for South Korean companies, such as Samsung, cropped up on luggage carts at Beijing's airport and on billboards around the Chinese capital.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
THE PASSAGE to democracy, like the passage to developed prosperity, can be rocky. The sudden rash of strikes in South Korea's lucrative export industries attests to that.These were political strikes against government legislation, not collective bargaining. But the law being protested was a change in labor relations rules, giving employers greater latitude in breaking strikes and firing workers.President Kim Young Sam's allies rammed the law through the National Assembly at an unannounced early morning meeting, before opposition deputies could muster.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - The Orioles introduced South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon to the media on Tuesday afternoon at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex. Yoon was flanked  by Orioles manager Buck Showalter, executive vice president Dan Duquette and his agent Tad Yo, who served as his interpreter. Here is a transcript of what Yoon had to say: On how familiar he is with the Orioles: “I know about Cal Ripken, Jr. having the longest per game streak, continuously. I knows about that.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Suk-min Yoon spent his childhood in South Korea idolizing fellow countryman Chan Ho Park as he became the first South Korean-born player to pitch the major leagues, all while hoping that one day he could follow in Park's footsteps. The 27-year-old right-hander's dream got closer to reality Tuesday, when the Orioles formally introduced him to the media, making Yoon the first player in franchise history to be born in South Korea. "I worked hard to get to that goal, and now that I'm here," Yoon said through agent Tad Hun Yo, who also served as an interpreter.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Finally there was a sighting of South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex on Saturday. Yoon was found sitting in the lobby with his representative, Tad Hun Yo of the Boras Corporation. I recognized him from his now-famous selfie wearing an Orioles cap . His representative politely declined an interview request with Yoon because the Orioles' three-year, $5.575-million deal with the pitcher is still not official. He said he was still waiting for word that Yoon passed his physical, but tentative plans were to introduce Yoon to the media on Monday.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- I have yet to see South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon arrive here at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex, but he is scheduled to have his club physical here this morning. At least I have that selfie he posted the other day for reference. Yoon, who has agreed to terms on a three-year, $5.575-million deal , flew in from Southern California and arrived in Florida on Thursday night. Once Yoon passes his physical, he still must obtain a work visa in South Korea before officially joining the club.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- On the eve of the first workout for pitchers and catchers this spring, the Orioles once again traveled an international route Thursday in an attempt to improve their pitching staff, agreeing to terms with South Korean right-handed pitcher Suk-min Yoon on a three-year deal, according to an industry source. The Orioles' agreement with the 27-year-old is worth $5.575 million guaranteed over the three years and is pending a club physical, the source said. The Orioles have not officially announced the deal.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
In another episode of how the Orioles' offseason turns, Korean right-hander Suk-min Yoon posted a "selfie" Twitter photo Tuesday night of him wearing an Orioles hat and flashing the peace sign. The caption apparently reads “ta-da.” There was no confirmation in the United States or Korea on Tuesday that the 27-year-old Yoon, a former Most Valuable Player of the Korea Baseball Organization, has indeed signed a deal with the Orioles. One source said Tuesday night that the club is negotiating with Yoon, but no deal has been reached -- not even pending a physical.
NEWS
February 25, 1996
THE UNITED NATIONS convention on the Law of the Sea was intended to resolve disputes, not start them. But it was Japan's intended ratification of the convention this year that brought a collision with South Korea over three tiny islands in the Korea Strait between them.It would be tempting to call the isles uninhabited but a Korean fisherman lives on one. South Korea put 26 soldiers there and, as the crisis developed, sent eight more. South Korea has claimed the islands since the year 512. Japan says it took them from Russia in 1904.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is planning to ship Patriot anti-missile batteries to South Korea, senior administration officials said yesterday.The anti-missile batteries were requested by Gen. Gary E. Luck, the senior U.S. commander in South Korea, and the move is supported by the Pentagon. President Clinton has not yet formally approved the request, but senior officials said he likely will.On Monday, the White House began consulting members of Congress about the move."I think there will be a positive decision," a senior official said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Denise Weiss and For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
This was the worst episode of "The Bachelor" to date, further reinforcing my beliefs that Juan Pablo is as interested in finding a wife as Sean Lowe is in foregoing his time in the Honeymoon Suite on his wedding night. Speaking of Sean, watching his wedding to Catherine helped to summarize the difference between Sean and Juan Pablo -- Sean is the guy to whom you say “I do,” while Juan Pablo is the guy you wake up next to after a long night of drinking and say “What did I do?
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