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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
It seems that the state of South Dakota has a beef with Joan Jett. Or a lack of beef, more accurately. Jett, who spent her formative years in Rockville , is a vegetarian and an animal rights activist. She's so committed to animal rights that she's about to appear on some PETA-themed United States Postal Service  stamps.  And that means the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association has a problem with Jett appearing on the state's float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City , according to CNN .  "Many livestock producers expressed concern about whether Joan Jett was an appropriate representative for an agriculturally oriented state like South Dakota," association executive director Jodie Anderson told CNN. So Joan Jett & the Blackhearts were moved off of South Dakota, to another, unspecified state.  "I've decided to switch from South Dakota to another float because people's political agendas were getting in the way of what should be a purely entertainment driven event," Jett said in a statement, according to CNN .  "I will remain focused on entertaining the millions of people watching, who will be celebrating a great American tradition," she said.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
It seems that the state of South Dakota has a beef with Joan Jett. Or a lack of beef, more accurately. Jett, who spent her formative years in Rockville , is a vegetarian and an animal rights activist. She's so committed to animal rights that she's about to appear on some PETA-themed United States Postal Service  stamps.  And that means the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association has a problem with Jett appearing on the state's float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City , according to CNN .  "Many livestock producers expressed concern about whether Joan Jett was an appropriate representative for an agriculturally oriented state like South Dakota," association executive director Jodie Anderson told CNN. So Joan Jett & the Blackhearts were moved off of South Dakota, to another, unspecified state.  "I've decided to switch from South Dakota to another float because people's political agendas were getting in the way of what should be a purely entertainment driven event," Jett said in a statement, according to CNN .  "I will remain focused on entertaining the millions of people watching, who will be celebrating a great American tradition," she said.
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BUSINESS
July 30, 1996
Youth Services International Inc. said it has been licensed to expand a residential program for delinquent youth in South Dakota, adding 24 beds to bring the facility's capacity to 108.The Owings Mills company said the extra beds mean about another $700,000 of annual revenue for the fast-growing operator of educational and behavioral-change programs aimed at juveniles.The new beds will be at Springfield Academy in Springfield, S.D., where students range in ages from 14 to 18. The average student stays in the program for about one year.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | November 7, 2013
This Friday, Nov. 8, in recognition of Native American Month, the Historical Society of Harford County will present the documentary film, "Dakota 38," the story of the Minnesota Sioux uprising of 1862 in reaction to mistreatment and starvation by United States government representatives. "Dakota 38" examines the incidents that lead to the uprising and its tragic aftermath which culminated with hanging of thirty-eight Dakota men. The film will be shown at Society headquarters, 143 N. Main Street in Bel Air at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 per person, $6 for students and teachers (including retired teachers)
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 1997
TEN RESIDENTS of northwest Carroll set out for Watertown, S.D., in mid-October to help repair damage from last spring's floods.Though the destruction was not as extensive as it was in areas of neighboring North Dakota, the need was very real. The effort proved to be rewarding for the people doing the work as it was for the mostly elderly recipients."One of the neatest parts of the trip was how people shared their stories with us," said Michelle Skiles, who coordinated the trip with her husband, Keir.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -- A buoyant Sen. Bob Kerrey headed south today to challenge Gov. Bill Clinton in Georgia, after his impressive victory in yesterday's South Dakota primary.Mr. Kerrey of Nebraska, proclaiming he had "struck gold in the Black Hills of South Dakota," broke into the winner's circle for the first time this primary season by establishing his affinity with the dominant farm community here, as a concerted effort to do the same by another South Dakota neighbor, Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, fell short.
FEATURES
By Eric Harrison and Eric Harrison,Los Angeles Times | August 6, 1991
PINE RIDGE, S.D. -- When Kevin Costner was filming "Dances With Wolves" in South Dakota last year, Loretta Cook, a Lakota Sioux Indian, had never heard of the actor.A friend who worked on the movie as an extra dropped by and showed her a photograph of herself and Costner. "Oh, nice," Cook responded. "Who is he? Your boyfriend?"Today, one would be hard pressed to find anyone in South Dakota who does not know who Costner is. His film about the life of a U.S. cavalryman who joins the Sioux is exploited in state-sponsored ads to promote tourism.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 15, 2006
CHICAGO -- For 33 years, opponents of abortion have followed the advice of St. Vincent de Paul, who said that if you must hurry, "hasten slowly." Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court made abortion on demand the law of the land, pro-lifers have worked tirelessly to move the court and the country toward allowing greater protection for the unborn. But today, some people in the anti-abortion movement are running low on patience. They are hastening quickly, oblivious to the risks to those they want to protect.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | October 3, 1991
Sioux Falls, S.D. -- AT THE LOCAL Disabled American Veterans hall here the other night, newly declared 1992 presidential candidate Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska was asked about the importance of South Dakota's presidential primary next Feb. 25."South Dakota as I see it is apt to be one of the top two primaries on the Democratic side, a very important primary," he said. "I view it as a wide-open race."Ordinarily that comment, linking the South Dakota primary with the high-profile, traditional kickoff primary in New Hampshire one week earlier, might be dismissed as little more than throwing a bone to this small prairie state.
FEATURES
By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty and Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty,Contributing Writers | July 5, 1992
The tom-toms are stilled and the Sioux ghost dancers gone from Stronghold Rock in the Badlands of southwest South Dakota.Anguished chants floating skyward, invoking the great buffalo spirits and foretelling the rebirth of the once-mighty Sioux Nation, have been silent for more than a century.But another ancient prophecy will be soon be fulfilled, when Chief Crazy Horse returns to lead his people back to the ways of dignity and self-reliance.The spirit of the great chief has been in the Black Hills west of Rapid City all along, of course, on the mountain known as the Crazy Horse Memorial.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby's proposed boycott of Florida is a terrible idea ( "Councilman wants Baltimore to boycott Florida after Zimmerman trial," Aug. 9). Since he is trying to protest the "stand your ground" law, it is only fair to protest it across the board. The resolution would encourage city agencies and investment boards to avoid doing business with companies in the Sunshine state as well as to traveling to the state itself. To be fair, we should apply the same resolution to the many states that have some form of stand-your-ground law. These include Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts (though the term is used very loosely there)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
He's 80 now, and slightly bent, as if preparing to set in a three-point stance. Three hip replacements, plus a new knee, will do that to a man. Not that Ordell Braase is complaining. "Physically, I'm in pretty good shape," said Braase, longtime defensive end for the Baltimore Colts. "Mentally? Well . . . it's getting a little cramped up there. " The years haven't fogged his recollections of the 1968 NFL championship, a 34-0 shutout before a crowd of 80,628 in Cleveland. Braase did his part, plowing through the Browns to register three sacks and stop Leroy Kelly, their storied running back, in his tracks.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,Los Angeles Times | April 12, 2007
The most intense battleground in the abortion debate these days revolves around a simple question: What do women need to know before they terminate a pregnancy? South Dakota lawmakers want to compel doctors - under penalty of a month in jail - to tell women that the abortion they seek will kill a "whole, separate, unique, living human being." South Carolina is on the verge of requiring women to review ultrasound images of their fetus with a physician before consenting to end the pregnancy.
FEATURES
By Steven Snyder and Steven Snyder,NEWSDAY | February 27, 2007
We all know that kids say the darndest things. Turns out they know the darndest things, too. On TV Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader? premieres tonight at 9:30 on Fox. SAMPLE QUESTIONS 1. Can you name all the colors of the rainbow? 2. Can you name all five Great Lakes? 3. In what state is Mount Rushmore located? Answers: 1. Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet; 2. Erie, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, Superior; 3. South Dakota
NEWS
By Stephanie Strom and Stephanie Strom,New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -- South Dakota's economic renaissance has gone largely unnoticed, eclipsed by things like the state's strong opposition to same-sex marriage, its raucous debates over abortion and the stroke suffered by one of its senators, Tim Johnson, that could tip control of the Senate back to the Republicans. But in the 1990s, its long-stagnant population began to grow, especially here and in Rapid City, and its economy began to diversify. Its lack of personal and corporate income taxes made it attractive to companies and their employees, and while other states tightened their usury laws, South Dakota relaxed them, attracting numerous credit card companies.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Tim Johnson, a South Dakota Democrat, was hospitalized yesterday and underwent surgery, but tests indicated that he did not suffer a stroke, his office said. Johnson, a centrist who has largely avoided the spotlight since being elected 10 years ago, became disoriented during a midday conference call with reporters. He was taken to George Washington University Hospital, where he was evaluated for a "possible stroke," his office said. A spokeswoman said later that doctors had found no evidence that Johnson, who turns 60 in two weeks, had suffered either a stroke or a heart attack, but he remained in the hospital.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy-Larronde and Suzanne Murphy-Larronde,Special to The Sun | July 3, 1994
In the grandstands of Rapid City's civic center, Alain Beauchamps lets his body sway gently to the hypnotic beat of tribal drums. Below him, male dancers, arrayed in lavish eagle-feather ornaments and bone breastplates, shuffle along the auditorium floor in the symbolic salute to the sun's journey across South Dakota skies. Then, on an invitation from the master of ceremonies, the French doctor, his wife and other spectators join in the dance.It's all standard fare at the Black Hills and Northern Plains Indian Pow Wow and Arts Exposition, an annual South Dakota event that unites Native Americans in a celebration of their enduring culture.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,Chicago Tribune | October 21, 2006
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -- It takes spunk for Katie Andert to sit in the middle of the Commons, day after day, behind a table festooned with signs demanding "Vote No on 6: Repeal the Abortion Ban." South Dakota is a distinctly conservative state, and the majority of its residents will tell you they are "pro-life." They'll also tell you South Dakotans prize politeness and eschew confrontation. Andert's booth on the Augustana College campus is a bit too in-your-face for most folks. But Andert, a 21-year-old psychology major, is part of a campaign to overturn the nation's toughest anti-abortion law in a statewide referendum Nov. 7. The outcome of the campaign, which dominates the pre-election landscape in South Dakota, could help determine the future of abortion rights nationwide.
NEWS
By NICHOLAS RICCARDI and NICHOLAS RICCARDI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2006
Abortion rights advocates submitted more than 37,000 signatures yesterday supporting a ballot initiative to overturn South Dakota's ban on abortions. If the secretary of state verifies the signatures, which number more than twice the amount needed to place a measure on the ballot, South Dakota residents will decide in November whether to keep the strictest ban in the nation. The measure, which outlaws abortions even in cases of rape or incest, unless the mother's life is at stake, is to take effect July 1. Doctors who perform abortions could be fined $5,000 and imprisoned for five years.
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