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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
Furious that the Anne Arundel County Council has approved zoning changes that will intensify development at several sites in the most rural areas of the county, residents are urging County Executive John R. Leopold to overturn the moves. Leopold, a Republican, is likely to use his line-item veto power to turn back at least some of the changes to the county's comprehensive zoning plan. The county executive, who has called some of the changes "irresponsible, egregious spot zoning," has up to 10 days from passage of the legislation to exercise the rarely used power.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For more than 30 years, John Astle has walked from his downtown Annapolis home to the State House, representing his friends and neighbors in Maryland's General Assembly. He's so well-known in the capital that he's frequently stopped on the street, whether by someone just saying hello or someone offering political concerns to the longtime Democratic senator. Astle hopes to keep doing the people's work for at least four more years. Standing in his way is Republican Don Quinn, a political newcomer who is young enough to be Astle's son. As Astle works to remind voters of his experience and connections at the State House, Quinn is offering himself as a fresh new face.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold says he's considering using his seldom-used veto power to prevent controversial zoning changes in some of the county's most rural areas likely to be approved by the County Council on Monday night. The threat of veto follows the passage of several amendments to the proposed rezoning bill for southern Anne Arundel and the Annapolis area, parts of which county planning officials have publicly criticized for veering too sharply from accepted zoning principles.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
Annapolis Center These trips are being offered through the Annapolis Senior Activity Center, 119 S. Villa Ave. Information: 410-222-1818. 'War Horse' The trip committee is accepting reservations to see the play Feb. 8 at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore. The ticket price of $147 includes transportation and lunch at George's in the Wyndham Peabody Court Hotel on Mount Vernon Place. The play tells the story of a horse that is sold to the cavalry and shipped from England to France during World War I. European river cruise The trip committee is accepting reservations for a cruise next summer on the Danube.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | May 20, 1993
Below the South River, where Route 2 outruns the traffic an the fast food joints, begins the place they call South County. It's not much given to hoopla, crowd scenes or loud noises, but this weekend it will take time to celebrate itself.The First Annual South County Festival will bring together merchants, crafts people, American Indians, historians, storytellers and dancers.For eight hours on Saturday, at Herrington Harbour North in Tracy's Landing, they will show the stuff of South County's history and culture.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
Student killed in car crash at intersectionA 17-year-old Southern High student was killed Monday afternoon when the car he was driving was broadsided at a South County intersection.Eric Christopher Warch, 17, of the 5100 block of Chalk Point Road in West River was pronounced dead on arrival at Anne Arundel Medical Center. Police said he suffered fatal head injuries.Police said Eric was driving a 1982 Buick east on Owensville Road when he stopped at the intersection of Muddy Creek Road about 4:30 p.m.When he pulled into the intersection, police said he was hit by a 1983 Chevrolet driven by Rodney Althouse, 30, of the 1400 block of St. Christopher Court in Edgewood, who was driving south.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
THE FERVOR against development has become so surreal that some people in northern Anne Arundel County embrace the dumping of dredge spoil on a nearby "brownfields" site just so long as a professional auto racetrack doesn't get built there. Meanwhile, groups in southern Anne Arundel are fighting plans by three supermarket chains on the premise that they'd rather drive 20 miles for a sack of groceries than see new businessg that might foster more growth. Vocal residents in Shady Side and Deale are treating proposals by Safeway, Food Lion and Shoppers Food Warehouse as if they were designs for toxic waste dumps.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Public water and sewer service would not be expanded in South Anne Arundel County. Property owners would be given incentives to protect agriculture and open space. And recreational facilities need to be built without disrupting the area's rural flavor.These are some of the suggestions to control growth and development that the South County Small Area Planning Committee is considering.Committee members began talking to residents in April and are drafting a development plan for the county."We've really heard that people want to keep South County rural," said Debi Osborne, the committee's chairwoman.
NEWS
October 1, 1998
SOUTH COUNTY residents have called in reinforcements. In their struggle to contain development and defend the area's rural character, several organizations are participating in Countrywide Exchange, which will bring an international team of land-use experts to review South County's situation.Since this team has not been embroiled in South County's protracted battles over development, sponsors of the international effort expect it will bring a fresh perspective to some old issues.Eight land-use professionals from Canada, Europe and the United States will try to answer basic questions.
NEWS
August 21, 1997
VIRGINIA P. CLAGETT has been engaged in a 23-year battle to preserve farmland in southern Anne Arundel County.The Democratic state delegate knows the economic and development forces that would convert fields into subdivisions and shopping centers (and which she battled in her first political campaign in 1974) are still at work. But now they are much stronger.Like many of her South County neighbors, she worries that the county's new General Development Plan won't sufficiently protect the remaining farms.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Proposed traffic improvements to the main artery of southern Anne Arundel County have stoked fears that a better road will undermine efforts to keep the area undeveloped. "We're trying to stop that," said Lothian resident Charlotte Smutko, who was on the citizens panel that helped devise the county's plan on how the area should grow. "That's our motto: Keep South County rural. " More than 80 people crowded into the Deale library branch recently to scrutinize the $10 million worth of projects state officials have proposed for Route 2, also known as Solomons Island Road.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Board of Education is scheduled to vote next month on the school system's plans to redistrict three elementary schools in the southern part of the county. The board is expected to vote at its April 18 meeting on a proposal to move some students from Central Elementary School, which school officials say is over capacity, to Mayo and Davidsonville elementary schools. According to board policy, the redistricting process must be concluded by April 30. But the emotions regarding the matter probably aren't going away any time soon.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Ann Fligsten, a noted land-use attorney in Anne Arundel County, has long voiced her opinion on planning and zoning issues, testifying before the County Council and meeting with county officials. As chairwoman of the Growth Action Network, Fligsten helped organize a lawsuit filed last month alleging that the County Council violated state law by passing several amendments to a zoning bill that would allow development that opponents believe is prohibited by long-established county guidelines.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Opponents of a controversial Anne Arundel County zoning change filed suit Thursday in county Circuit Court, seeking to overturn the legislation that could intensify growth in some of the county's most rural areas. The suit alleges that the County Council violated state law in passing several amendments to the bill because the changes would allow development that opponents believe is prohibited by long-established land-use principles. It asks the court to throw out all or part of the bill and force the council to restart the zoning process.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Anne Arundel County residents, disgruntled by a series of zoning changes affirmed by the County Council last week, are weighing legal options to challenge what they claim is a violation of state law. The County Council overturned 10 vetoed amendments to the comprehensive rezoning bill for South County and Annapolis, allowing zoning changes on a number of projects, including a 118-acre trailer park. County Executive John R. Leopold vetoed 16 amendments to the bill last month, calling them a "flagrant violation" of long-standing development principles.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Anne Arundel County Councilman Jerry Walker plans to attempt to override several vetoes issued by County Executive John R. Leopold on a rezoning bill for the southern portion of the county. Leopold vetoed 16 amendments Tuesday to the rezoning bill that sought to allow intensified development in some of the county's most rural areas, including south of Route 214, an unofficial line of demarcation for development. All but one of the vetoes affected South County. "I was surprised there were so many" vetoes, said Walker, a Republican, who shepherded the bill through the County Council, which passed it unanimously.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | September 16, 1990
His vision of a mini-city sprouting from rural South County's woods infuriated folks for miles around.Laurel developer Michael T. Rose had come around with what one longtime resident labeled a "dog and pony show," a well-rehearsed sales pitch, glossy maps, artists' renditions -- and a prophecy.Large-scale development inevitably would crop up around mand make it environmentally friendly, he told residents, or resign yourselves to a sprawling hodgepodge of houses and businesses.In a matter of months, Rose expects to see the first bulldozers on site at the largest single residential/commercial development South County has ever seen.
NEWS
August 20, 1998
SOUTH COUNTY is preoccupied with growth. This district includes Anne Arundel's most rural areas and the largest collection of active farmers. Watermen still operate out of towns with romantic names such as Shady Side, Rose Haven and Galesville. The district also includes Crofton, a bedroom suburb of both Washington and Baltimore that continues to expand.Democrats don't have a contested primary in the 7th Councilmanic District. The lone candidate is Timothy J. Shearer of Shady Side.Republicans have two candidates vying for the nomination: incumbent John J. Klocko III, seeking a second term, and Patricia O'Brien Boarman, a perennial candidate from Deale.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has vetoed several sections of a zoning bill that recently passed the County Council and sought to intensify development in some of the county's most rural areas. Leopold announced Tuesday that he had vetoed 16 amendments to the comprehensive rezoning bill for South County and Annapolis, which the council passed unanimously last week. Leopold called the amendments in question a "flagrant violation of the principles of the General Development Plan and the Small Area Plans that proceeded it. " The move is likely to be cheered by some South County residents, many of whom opposed the changes.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
A Harwood man admitted last week in court that he purposely smashed his pickup truck into three Anne Arundel County police cruisers and injured three officers. William Richard Leapley Jr., 27, who is deaf and described by his lawyer as having emotional and educational issues, pleaded guilty Tuesday to three counts of felony assault before Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner. Leapley's sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 4. State guidelines call for a prison sentence of between three and 25 years.
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