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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 5, 1994
A girl asks her mom for a new jacket. Mom says no, because mom hasn't got any money."Fine, I'll just ask my dad then," the girl says angrily."Fine," mom replies, "now all you've got to do is find his [expletive deleted]."Welcome to "South Central," the new half-hour comedy from Fox that premieres at 8 tonight on WBFF-Channel 45.In a number of ways, it marks how far we've come in TV-America from the land of the Cleavers -- where June's harshest expression was, "Beaver, you just wait until your father gets home."
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Right around the time major league teams first began taking notice of a talented young outfielder playing at Crenshaw High in South Central Los Angeles, a harsh reality check came for Trayvon Robinson. The Orioles outfielder was in the 10th grade when his mailbox started to fill with questionnaires from big league clubs, inspiring hope in a place where young men are far more likely to become gang members than major league baseball players. Then, one day, shots rang out from outside his family's housing complex.
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NEWS
By Seth Mydans and Seth Mydans,New York Times News Service | January 27, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- On battered streets where vacant lots display the unhealed damage of the 1992 riots, earthquake survivors in South-Central Los Angeles are struggling again to recover from disaster, even as public sympathy dwells on their wealthier neighbors in the San Fernando Valley.Far from the epicenter and the limelight in this new catastrophe, these residents of the inner city stand patiently in long lines at disaster relief centers or sit on newly broken porches as they wait for federal loans to be approved.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 4, 2006
As he danced on street corners and at kiddie parties throughout South Central Los Angeles outfitted in a Crayola-yellow jumpsuit and a mammoth rainbow Afro wig, his face painted white and adorned with crude drawings of red balloons, Tommy Johnson had no idea he was starting a "movement." Soon, his dance style, a kinetic fusion of pop-locking and buffoonish antics he called "clowning," was picked up by the neighborhood kids. They sexualized it, sped up the gyrations, made the face paint more geometric and called the style "krumping."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
Of course we look at the cities and we wonder what's to be done. The litany of chaos seems overwhelming, the vortex of pathologies seemingly hellbent on crushing a generation, much in the way World War I claimed a whole generation of British youth.But say this for "South Central": Though it is not a great movie by any stretch of the imagination, it attempts what so few others have dared -- it gives an answer.Somewhat lamely dramatized, it's more like a piece of earnest anthropology that spends its first third explicating the attraction of the gang life to young African-American men, its middle third examining the inevitable consequences of that attraction, and its last third offering a solution.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | April 16, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Adriana Tamayo wants you to know something about the people who live in her neighborhood, South Central:"We are not animals."After the riots that wracked several areas of Los Angeles, no place became more notorious than South Central, where some of the worst rioting began with the beating of truck driver Reginald Denny at the now infamous corner of Florence and Normandie.But from the perspective of youth -- which is every community's hope for the future -- this is home. In spite of the plague of poverty, crime and gang violence, this neighborhood is the backdrop that will tinge memories -- fond or not -- of that roller-coaster ride of adolescence familiar to all races and classes.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2000
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- A reporter asked Jason Hart yesterday if he would back down from Michigan State's Mateen Cleaves, causing the Syracuse point guard to do a double-take. Cleaves may represent one of his biggest challenges on the court, but Hart has had other fears. Life-threatening fears. Hart had to survive South Central Los Angeles. He had to survive the guns, the violence, the deaths. The 6-foot-3 senior can painfully recount over 20 friends and acquaintances in his neighborhood who have been killed while he's been at the central New York school.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1998
Home values nationwide increased by 5.7 percent in the first quarter of 1998, according to the Conventional Mortgage Home-Price Index released by Freddie Mac.The index also showed that home-price appreciation increased 5.5 percent from the first quarter of 1997 to the first quarter of this year.Regionally, the South Atlantic Division, which includes Maryland, had an annualized growth rate of 7.6 percent for the quarter, and home values increased 6.2 percent for the last 12 months.For the last five years, the region has had an increase of 19.9 percent.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 4, 2006
As he danced on street corners and at kiddie parties throughout South Central Los Angeles outfitted in a Crayola-yellow jumpsuit and a mammoth rainbow Afro wig, his face painted white and adorned with crude drawings of red balloons, Tommy Johnson had no idea he was starting a "movement." Soon, his dance style, a kinetic fusion of pop-locking and buffoonish antics he called "clowning," was picked up by the neighborhood kids. They sexualized it, sped up the gyrations, made the face paint more geometric and called the style "krumping."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Reginald Denny, the truck driver who was beaten severely in the first moments of the unrest in the city's South Central area, was able to talk yesterday for the first time since the incident, and doctors upgraded his condition to good.Doctors at Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital in Inglewood, where Mr. Denny was taken by a group of onlookers after the beating Wednesday night, said his prognosis was improving. They said they still had not determined whether Mr. Denny had suffered permanent brain injuries.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2000
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- A reporter asked Jason Hart yesterday if he would back down from Michigan State's Mateen Cleaves, causing the Syracuse point guard to do a double-take. Cleaves may represent one of his biggest challenges on the court, but Hart has had other fears. Life-threatening fears. Hart had to survive South Central Los Angeles. He had to survive the guns, the violence, the deaths. The 6-foot-3 senior can painfully recount over 20 friends and acquaintances in his neighborhood who have been killed while he's been at the central New York school.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1998
Home values nationwide increased by 5.7 percent in the first quarter of 1998, according to the Conventional Mortgage Home-Price Index released by Freddie Mac.The index also showed that home-price appreciation increased 5.5 percent from the first quarter of 1997 to the first quarter of this year.Regionally, the South Atlantic Division, which includes Maryland, had an annualized growth rate of 7.6 percent for the quarter, and home values increased 6.2 percent for the last 12 months.For the last five years, the region has had an increase of 19.9 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 30, 1997
Voices from South CentralBaltimore native Anna Deavere Smith will perform her Tony-nominated one-woman show, "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992," at Ford's Theatre in Washington for a limited run beginning tonight. Part of her continuing series called "On the Road: A Search for American Character," the show focuses on the riots that broke out in South Central Los Angeles in the aftermath of the first Rodney King trial.Like "Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and Other Identities," which Smith performed at Center Stage in 1995, "Twilight" was compiled from scores of verbatim interviews.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 24, 1994
Imagine, for a moment, the public outcry if the networks were to announce that, in the new fall season, ''Blossom'' and ''Married . . . with Children'' will be the only prime-time network television programs that would portray the lives of white people in America.Right. It couldn't happen. Audiences would not tolerate such a narrow portrayal of white people. The public would demand more diversity -- more dramas, more docu-dramas, more action, more soaps, more stories of love, more stories of hate, more triumph, more tragedy, more of a reflection of real life as we know it.But, if you can imagine how upset white television viewers would be by a steady diet of narrow depictions of their lives, perhaps you can begin to understand why so many black television viewers are upset to hear that the Fox Television Network has decided to drop ''Roc,'' ''Sinbad'' and ''South Central'' from their fall lineup.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 5, 1994
There's a long-awaited new series premiering tonight on Fox: "South Central," a seriocomic look at life in one of the most rugged and high-profile areas of Los Angeles. Unfortunately, the pilot makes it quite clear that, despite a minority cast and a heap of good intentions, it wasn't worth the wait.* "South Central." (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This new series is called a comedy-drama, which usually means it wavers between laughs and poignancy. In the case of "South Central," however, it has a less kind meaning: The comedy isn't at all funny, and some of the dramatic portions are unintentionally amusing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 5, 1994
A girl asks her mom for a new jacket. Mom says no, because mom hasn't got any money."Fine, I'll just ask my dad then," the girl says angrily."Fine," mom replies, "now all you've got to do is find his [expletive deleted]."Welcome to "South Central," the new half-hour comedy from Fox that premieres at 8 tonight on WBFF-Channel 45.In a number of ways, it marks how far we've come in TV-America from the land of the Cleavers -- where June's harshest expression was, "Beaver, you just wait until your father gets home."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 30, 1997
Voices from South CentralBaltimore native Anna Deavere Smith will perform her Tony-nominated one-woman show, "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992," at Ford's Theatre in Washington for a limited run beginning tonight. Part of her continuing series called "On the Road: A Search for American Character," the show focuses on the riots that broke out in South Central Los Angeles in the aftermath of the first Rodney King trial.Like "Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and Other Identities," which Smith performed at Center Stage in 1995, "Twilight" was compiled from scores of verbatim interviews.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 5, 1994
There's a long-awaited new series premiering tonight on Fox: "South Central," a seriocomic look at life in one of the most rugged and high-profile areas of Los Angeles. Unfortunately, the pilot makes it quite clear that, despite a minority cast and a heap of good intentions, it wasn't worth the wait.* "South Central." (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This new series is called a comedy-drama, which usually means it wavers between laughs and poignancy. In the case of "South Central," however, it has a less kind meaning: The comedy isn't at all funny, and some of the dramatic portions are unintentionally amusing.
NEWS
By Seth Mydans and Seth Mydans,New York Times News Service | January 27, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- On battered streets where vacant lots display the unhealed damage of the 1992 riots, earthquake survivors in South-Central Los Angeles are struggling again to recover from disaster, even as public sympathy dwells on their wealthier neighbors in the San Fernando Valley.Far from the epicenter and the limelight in this new catastrophe, these residents of the inner city stand patiently in long lines at disaster relief centers or sit on newly broken porches as they wait for federal loans to be approved.
FEATURES
By Harry F. Waters and Harry F. Waters,Newsweek | December 5, 1993
Michael Weithorn and Ralph Farquhar had a dream. The two television writers dreamed of creating a realistic comedy-drama series set in the most unfunny setting imaginable: riot-ravaged South-Central Los Angeles.Still, CBS bought the concept. A few months ago its programmers got their first look at "South Central," the story of a single African-American mother struggling to raise three children. First, they demanded less drama and a lot more comedy. "Make it a black 'Roseanne,' " suggested one CBS executive.
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