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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton leaves for India and Pakistan today,seeking to defuse what foreign policy analysts describe as a nuclear war in the making. Long the favorites among geopolitical oddsmakers to produce a nuclear conflict, India and Pakistan are at the highest state of mutual suspicion and hatred in years. For Clinton, any reduction in tensions will mean a successful mission, analysts say. "If the trip results in resumed dialogue between India and Pakistan, as a former professor I'd give Clinton an A," says Stephen Cohen, a South Asia specialist for the Brookings Institution.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
At the end of a long, scorching day in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, my colleagues and I, participants in a journalism fellowship, were famished. After a hair-raising lift in an auto rickshaw through the teeming metropolis and a pearl-shopping spree, it was time to indulge in a third local pastime: biryani. We were steered to Hyderabad House, a franchise specializing in biryani as it was prepared for centuries to the specifications of the nizams who ruled the once princely state.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A disastrous food shortage threatens many of the world's poorer nations, especially in Africa and South Asia, by the end of the decade, a panel of agriculture experts warned yesterday.Population growth, environmental degradation and slowing food production make other countries besides Somalia ripe for famine, the panel said. And foreign aid for Third World farmers is dwindling at a time when more help is needed."Without more action now, we will, 20 years from now, look back on current food problems as insignificant," said Per Pinstrup-Andersen, director general of the International Food Policy Research Institute, which organized the symposium.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
A small room at the County Office Building in Westminster has become filled in the past two weeks with hundreds of bars of soap, tubes of toothpaste and boxes of bandages. Combs, nail files, towels and washcloths and all manner of baby supplies are also taking up space, until they can be packed and shipped to South Asia for the tsunami relief effort. The drive for supplies, sponsored by the Carroll County commissioners, took place throughout the building in the county seat and at the five public library branches.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Opting for cautious dialogue with Pakistan instead of a public snub, President Clinton will stop briefly in Islamabad this month during a trip through South Asia, administration officials said yesterday. The decision comes after months of debate within the administration over whether to reward Pakistan's military-led government with a presidential visit. The current leader, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, overthrew the country's elected regime last fall and so far has refused to set a timetable for returning to democracy.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
A small room at the County Office Building in Westminster has become filled in the past two weeks with hundreds of bars of soap, tubes of toothpaste and boxes of Band-Aids. Combs, nail files, towels and washcloths and all manner of baby supplies are also taking up space, until they can be packed and shipped to South Asia for the tsunami relief effort. The drive for supplies, sponsored by the Carroll County commissioners, took place throughout the building in the county seat and at the five public library branches.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
CHESTERTOWN -- They have seen the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, the National Aquarium in Baltimore. They've been to a minor league baseball game, and they saw the Fourth of July parade in Rock Hall. Now, they're eagerly anticipating trips to the United Nations in New York and the "shrines of democracy" in Washington. But the enduring memories that many in this group of young Muslims will take home are of a freewheeling session with Margo Bailey, the roll-up-her-sleeves mayor of this town of 4,100, and of the lush little campus of Washington College at the top of the hill.
NEWS
By Akhilesh Upadhyay | June 21, 1998
KATHMANDU -- To most Westerners, Nepal falls into a blind spot. To others, it conjures a vague image of an exotic Shangri-la, to which adventurist relatives and friends ventured at the height of the Hippie Era. The verdant Valley of Kathmandu, blessed with year-round sunshine, was an idyll. It also offered cheap marijuana.But that's not the dominant image of Nepal anymore. Kathmandu is getting increasingly crowded, and there has been a clampdown on drug peddlers. Hippies have long vanished from the streets of the medieval-looking capital.
NEWS
By Tom Z. Collina | July 21, 1998
NOW THAT the dust has settled at the Indian and Pakistani test sites, some conservative politicians and pundits are issuing an eerily consistent reaction: Missile defense, good. Test ban, bad. Although this refrain may be politically convenient, it will not solve the real security threats facing the world.Many are using these recent global events and their profound implications for U.S. security to "spin" their own political agenda. How else to interpret the gallons of ink that have been spilled on op-ed pages calling for the deployment of a national ballistic missile defense in response to South Asian nuclear tests and missile developments?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., which operates universities around the world, has stopped classes at its startup engineering college in India because the regulatory environment is "in a state of chaos," an official with the Baltimore company said yesterday. John K. Hoey, Sylvan's senior vice president of corporate operations, said 55 students had completed one semester at South Asia International Institute in December when the company put the college on hold. Sylvan estimated the cost of starting the institution and refunding students' tuition at less than $2 million.
NEWS
January 7, 2005
Congress' role in security still a divisive mess In a world aflame with wars and tsunamis, a contentious U.S. Congress is unable to agree on a plan to reorganize its critical homeland security oversight ("Homeland security turf war is likely," Jan. 4). On an issue as sensitive and important as combating terrorism, our lawmakers are squabbling over how to preserve their own turf instead of concentrating on how to protect American lives and property. As The Sun noted, there are 88 congressional committees that deal with homeland security issues, and all 100 senators and 412 of the 435 House members sit on those committees.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2004
NEW YORK - In what could prove to be the biggest relief operation in United Nations history, Secretary-General Kofi Annan said yesterday that the world organization had received pledges of $500 million to provide emergency assistance to victims of the South Asia earthquake and tsunamis. More than 30 nations have pledged $250 million, including a U.S. promise of $35 million, which Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday was "only the beginning." The other $250 million will come from the World Bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
NEW YORK - From the slums of Bombay, Akaash, a young and handsome wannabe actor and singer, crashes the nationally televised Miss India pageant and steals the spotlight, catapulting him into fame as a Bollywood film star. When we next see him, he's wearing a tight, gleaming white outfit, gyrating wildly and singing the infectious "Shakalaka Baby" with an ensemble of brightly clothed dancers and a glamorous diva co-star. Against a whirl of percussion-driven choreography, an explosion of water fountains and soaking-wet saris, Akaash, the "Diamond in the Rough," makes his bid to become a bonafide Bollywood breakout hit. These scenes, from the first night of previews for the new Andrew Lloyd Webber-produced Broadway musical Bombay Dreams earlier this month, brought roars of approval and bursts of applause.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., which operates universities around the world, has stopped classes at its startup engineering college in India because the regulatory environment is "in a state of chaos," an official with the Baltimore company said yesterday. John K. Hoey, Sylvan's senior vice president of corporate operations, said 55 students had completed one semester at South Asia International Institute in December when the company put the college on hold. Sylvan estimated the cost of starting the institution and refunding students' tuition at less than $2 million.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - More than two months after launching a campaign to draw at least 10,000 troops from the Muslim world and India to help stabilize Iraq, the United States has seen its plans founder on a combination of Iraqi opposition, anti-American sentiment, anger over the U.S.-led invasion and alarm over mounting violence. The Pentagon had hoped to gain an army division's worth of additional foreign soldiers as replacements for U.S. troops. Now, it is forced to use already-stretched American forces, including more than 20,000 Marines who weren't part of the troop rotation scheme.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
CHESTERTOWN -- They have seen the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, the National Aquarium in Baltimore. They've been to a minor league baseball game, and they saw the Fourth of July parade in Rock Hall. Now, they're eagerly anticipating trips to the United Nations in New York and the "shrines of democracy" in Washington. But the enduring memories that many in this group of young Muslims will take home are of a freewheeling session with Margo Bailey, the roll-up-her-sleeves mayor of this town of 4,100, and of the lush little campus of Washington College at the top of the hill.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 11, 2001
BEIJING - For the United States, maintaining good relations with both India and Pakistan has often been an impossible task. The hatred between South Asia's archrivals is so great that attempts to befriend one usually antagonized the other. Now, the war in Afghanistan has created a rare opportunity to break that cycle. The United States, Pakistan and India have found themselves on unfamiliar ground: the same side. And Washington probably has better simultaneous relations with the two nations than at any other time since their founding as independent states more than a half-century ago. This unexpected byproduct of the Sept.
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