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By Michael Clough | September 28, 1995
JOHANNESBURG -- Recently, as I listened to South Africans describe the challenges their country faces, I sensed that something big had changed: The Nelson Mandela phase of the post-apartheid era is drawing to a close.It began when Mr. Mandela walked out of prison in February 1990 and continued on through his successful negotiations to end three centuries of white domination. High drama and miracles marked this phase. At times, the country was held together only by the sheer force of Mr. Mandela's personality.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Anne Arundel County Council unanimously passed a resolution honoring the late Nelson Mandela on Monday night, after Councilman Daryl Jones made a personal appeal. Jones recalled his time as a college student in the 1980s, when he lobbied the University of Maryland to cut its financial ties with companies doing business in South Africa, which operated under apartheid at the time. Around the same time, Jones said, then-Mayor Richard Hillman of Annapolis was arrested during anti-apartheid demonstrations in Washington.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | February 20, 1991
When breaking down racial barriers, meeting people is more effective than just hearing about them."When the kids could see the only real difference that existed was skin color, they could come out and share experiences," said Judy Bixler of her work with an interracial missionary group in South Africa, where segregation was mandated by the government."
NEWS
By David Horsey and By David Horsey | December 17, 2013
At the memorial for Nelson Mandela, President Obama gave those who pander to right-wing outrage two great opportunities to rattle the cage of Obama haters. The first was his handshake with Cuban leader Raul Castro; the second was the "selfie" he posed for with Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning Schmidt and British Prime Minister David Cameron. Taking the second one first, critics said that it was disrespectful for the president to be clowning around with the two PMs in the middle of a funeral.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
About a dozen black South African middle managers looking to climb the corporate ladder will be getting help next year thanks to an Anne Arundel Community College administrator.Gloria A. Holland, director of the college's Office of Business and Employee Training, visited Johannesburg this summer to get ideas for a program to train future black South African business leaders.South Africa, once torn by apartheid, is looking for ways to train black managers for higher corporate positions, said Ms. Holland.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
If you've ever spent time in South Africa, the latest sensation in herbal tea will come as no surprise. Red tea is finally showing up in American grocery stores, and it's gaining notice as much for its full-bodied taste as for its many healthful properties. Rooibos (pronounced roy-boss) is Afrikaans for red bush and has long been a favorite drink in South Africa, where the plant grows in the Cederberg Mountain Range of the country's Western Cape region. South Africans have brewed tea from rooibos leaves for centuries, discovering in this beverage a good way to calm rocky stomachs in adults or comfort colicky babies, soothe irritated skin or even ease the way into sleep.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1995
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Defying fears of anarchy or apathy, South Africans celebrated another level of democracy yesterday as long lines of voters snaked away from the polling stations in local elections.At one station near the Kruger National Park, voters reportedly had to outmaneuver an elephant grazing on berries in a nearby tree. At several stations in the township of Soweto, voters faced the wrath of supporters of the Inkatha Freedom Party, who claimed one of their candidates was not properly listed on the ballot.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 23, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Tokyo Sexwale was a political prisoner on infamous Robben Island during the apartheid era, a provincial governor after the arrival of democracy and is now a member of an emerging black elite. He is also being called the country's Donald Trump for his latest venture, as the future host of South Africa's version of The Apprentice. On each week's episode he will, Trump-style, "fire" another contestant vying for a big-money job with Sexwale's company, until a winner emerges.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | February 6, 1992
The South African Embassy sits nestled among the trees and broad green lawns of upper Massachusetts Avenue in Washington.It is a nondescript building in a quiet neighborhood on the edge of Rock Creek Park, just about two miles northwest of the White House.Three black South Africans are assigned to the diplomatic mission there."Why does this surprise you?" demanded Vernie Chetty, the third secretary and political liaison to Capitol Hill."Because you are black South Africans," I answered."And what of that?"
NEWS
June 8, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Australian, in New South Wales, which was published Wednesday.CHANGE of government anywhere can be risky but South Africa faces an extraordinarily delicate period in its development. Most South Africans still live in poverty, waiting for basic material living conditions that they believe are theirs by right.Nelson Mandela's government was one of transition and reconciliation. The need to build economic and social stability, while reinforcing political integrity and transparency, is just as crucial but the task requires a government and leader prepared to forge their own path.
NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
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By Stan Ber, howardcountysports@patuxent.com | December 9, 2013
This is what is commonly called a no-win situation. A fight at a football game on Sept. 21 between Mt. Hebron and Centennial resulted in the following: two coaches and four players ejected from the game. A Centennial player sustained a broken wrist and his father then sued an assistant coach at Centennial for injuring his son. The case went to court and the assault charge against the coach was dropped. But the coach was removed. So everybody essentially loses. The biggest losers unfortunately are the youngster who was injured, the players who lost a coach in the middle of the season, and coaches and future coaches who instinctively would attempt to break up a fight, but who might now have to think twice before wading in for fear of legal action.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Baltimore Rep. Elijah Cummings will be among 26 congressmen traveling to South Africa to attend memorial services for revered leader Nelson Mandela Tuesday in FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto. It was at that stadium in July 2010 that Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final. Mandela, who died Thursday evening at the age of 95, will be buried Dec. 15 in his hometown of Qunu, following a traditional 10 days of mourning. It was there that the first black president of the divided country spent his childhood years.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
NEWS
By Ronald M. Shapiro | October 29, 2013
I wondered, as the most recent congressional political convulsions came to a close, what lessons the leaders of our polarized political parties might learn from the example of Nelson Mandela. He did not succumb to pure partisanship as he led South Africa from the violence and repression of Apartheid to a multicultural functioning democracy. When Mr. Mandela was released from prison in 1990, South Africa's racial and political divisions were in many ways sharper than the economic divide that tore our Congress apart.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
With songs, stirring words and a cake, a group of Baltimoreans joined the worldwide party to celebrate Nelson Mandela's 95th birthday, an occasion made even happier by news that the health of the hospitalized former South African president was improving. "I was waiting for this day for a long time," said the Rev. Mankekolo Mahlangu-Ngcobo, a minister public health educator from South Africa who led a celebration at Sharp Street Memorial United Methodist Church in Baltimore. "I know people lost hope … but we can celebrate 95 years of Nelson Mandela's life - hallelujah!"
NEWS
By Samson Mulugeta and Samson Mulugeta,NEWSDAY | April 16, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Election results showed the African National Congress headed yesterday for a sweeping victory that would give it a two-thirds majority in Parliament and the power to unilaterally change the constitution. Nearly complete returns from Wednesday's voting showed the ANC winning seven of the country's nine provinces and leading in the remaining two, and enjoying even greater support than it did in the historic 1994 vote that ended white-minority rule and brought Nelson Mandela to power.
NEWS
By Laura Hambleton | September 21, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA -- The South African chapter of the Girl Scouts held a bake sale last week for victims of Hurricane Katrina at my children's international school. My 13-year-old daughter donated a pan of brownies for the cause, dusting them with powdered sugar. Selling chocolate chip cookies, brownies and Rice Krispies treats, the girls raised about $100, which they handed over to the Red Cross. Not much more has been forthcoming from South Africa, or from other African countries.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Kip and Harrison Hart sit at the kitchen table in their Towson home, along with their mother, Barb Cox, and their South African "brother," Phinius Sebatsane, pondering how they're going to handle the massive amount of donations filling the dining and living rooms. Through the doorway looms 1,400 pounds of donated lacrosse shoes, uniforms and equipment, coming from Friends School and Hereford High, as well as other schools around the country. In Wisconsin, the St. John's Northwestern Military Academy collected another 2,500 pounds of donations, packed in 50-pound boxes.
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