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By Matthew Durington | February 22, 2013
As details continue to emerge about the killing of Reeva Steenkamp by the Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius, one fact appears to be certain: The man known as the "Blade Runner" did fire four bullets through a bathroom door in his South African home, killing his girlfriend. Thus, it might appear that this will be an open-and-shut case when Mr. Pistorius goes before a judge in a trial that will inevitably become a media spectacle in South Africa and beyond on the scale of the O.J. Simpson trial.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
As thousands of Baltimore-area college students accept their diplomas this spring, many will have found themselves profoundly transformed by the experience. Members of the Class of 2014 include a woman with cystic fibrosis who was told she would never live to see graduation. One is a South African who had her son while in college and hopes to return home to teach schoolchildren with special needs. One will fly to Kenya this summer to finish work on a clean drinking water system. Another had a turbulent childhood in foster care and spent time in jail before joining a church and enrolling in college.
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By Grahame L. Jones, Tribune Newspapers | June 17, 2010
JOHANNESBURG — There is an undertone of disquiet about the 2010 World Cup. It is difficult to pin down exactly, but the feeling is pervasive and clues to its identity seem to surface daily. It would be too much to blame it on the country's sad and complicated history, but the legacy of apartheid did come into play Wednesday. Readers in Johannesburg awoke to see the headline "History is on Bafana's side" emblazoned across the front page of the Star. The reference was host South Africa's game against Uruguay and also to June 16, 1976, when thousands of schoolchildren in Soweto staged a protest march.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
What a dreadful experience for the Stevenson University students who were robbed in South Africa ( "Stevenson students return after being robbed in South Africa," May 14). They were lucky former Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III was on the bus. Even though he and the other chaperon considered grabbing the robber's weapons, they refrained. Others might not have, and by grabbing a weapon, the kids could have been badly injured or killed. The story horrified me because a similar incident happened to a family member during a college-sponsored trip to an African country.
NEWS
May 14, 1991
The conviction of Winnie Mandela for kidnapping and being an accessory to assault was one more blow to the internal peace process in South Africa. It was probably both inevitable and called-for by events of a radically different, though very recent, past. And it is probably not trumped up. The sentencing of the convicted -- a child welfare expert who was South Africa's first diploma'd black social worker 36 years ago -- is awaited.Through South Africa's history, the just and the unjust, the corrupt and the incorruptible, have coexisted.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Despite war in the Persian Gulf, in South Africa this week there was progress toward peace. After a day-long meeting on Tuesday, African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi announced a major breakthrough toward ending a split that in recent years has turned violent and deadly. Since 1986, fighting between rival factions of South Africa's black community has claimed as many as 5,000 lives.The meeting, the first between the two leaders in almost three decades, may not immediately end the vicious rivalry between the followers of the two men. But the cordial atmosphere of the meeting and the two men's acknowledgment that their differences had been fully addressed without acrimony are reasons to hope that the healing process has truly begun.
NEWS
December 11, 1993
As Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk, the odd couple of historic destiny, received their well-deserved Nobel Peace Prizes Oslo yesterday, South Africa was not the country it had long been. During the week, it changed utterly.On Tuesday in Cape Town, exclusively white minority rule ended. Mr. de Klerk promulgated the Transitional Executive Council (TEC) -- 32 members (only seven of them white) from 16 parties -- to oversee his government. Unfortunately, groups of black and white conservatives under the rubric of the Freedom Alliance stayed out after negotiations to include them had failed.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
South Africa is moving so swiftly on some fronts that its biggest need is to catch up with itself on others. Nigeria's President Ibrahim Babangida, chairman of the Organization of African Unity, welcomed South Africa's President F. W. de Klerk as "the man who closed the book on apartheid." It will be hard for any government's sanctions to remain in place long after that.But for South Africa to move into economic leadership of all Africa, its peoples have to share power with each other. And that is becoming more difficult as the violence between Xhosa-African National Congress people on one side and Zulu-Inkatha Freedom Party people on the other grows worse.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
President Bush was premature in lifting sanctions against South Africa. Given a little more time, the Pretoria government headed by F.W. De Klerk and the African National Congress headed by Nelson Mandela seemed destined to settle the question of releasing all political prisoners, the only one of five preconditions still in dispute. It would have been better if the South Africans, black and white, had worked out this matter among themselves.Nevertheless, U.S. action to terminate the psychological, political and economic isolation of South Africa was a recognition of reality.
NEWS
By The Providence (R.I.) Journal | July 24, 1991
PRESIDENT BUSH'S decision to lift economic sanctions against South Africa is good news -- especially for black South Africans, who have been materially hurt more than anyone by the effects of these penalties.Pretoria has made extraordinary strides toward democracy and the removal of the ghastly system of apartheid.Much more needs to be done and the democratic world is obligated to keep pushing. But the reform process is far advanced..It is doubtful that sanctions ever had quite the effect in pushing South Africa toward liberalization that proponents asserted.
NEWS
Kelly Virginia Phelan | May 13, 2014
In light of the recent kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls and the worldwide call to #BringBackOurGirls, it is important to note that the difficulties facing young females in Sub-Saharan Africa extend far beyond this tragedy. Last week Jean Waller Brune, the Head of Roland Park Country School, wrote a moving piece about the challenges of girls' education around the globe ("Bring back our girls," May 8). I am a proud alumna of RPCS and remember Mrs. Brune fondly. Her words affected me profoundly, now more than ever, as I am a resident of Africa and witness these types of atrocities daily.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
A group of students on a tour of South Africa led by Stevenson University was robbed on Sunday while traveling in Pretoria, a school spokeswoman said. No one was injured in the incident, which occurred about 1 p.m. local time in the South African capital, spokeswoman Glenda LeGendre said. College officials said Monday that the students and chaperones will be returning home by the end of the week. The university made the decision to cut the five-week tour short to ensure their well-being.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Anne Arundel County Council unanimously passed a resolution honoring the late Nelson Mandela on Monday night, after Councilman Daryl Jones made a personal appeal. Jones recalled his time as a college student in the 1980s, when he lobbied the University of Maryland to cut its financial ties with companies doing business in South Africa, which operated under apartheid at the time. Around the same time, Jones said, then-Mayor Richard Hillman of Annapolis was arrested during anti-apartheid demonstrations in Washington.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
I agree with Sherman Howell, "Nelson Mandela showed powerfully how one person can improve the world" [Dec. 12], but I think that it could serve a useful purpose to point out that, as far as the current adulation of Mandela by the U.S. is concerned, it was not ever thus. Did you know that Mandela was, until 2008, on the U.S. terrorist watch list, no doubt because of his perceived leanings toward communism? Did you know that the CIA was involved in his incarceration at Robbin Island?
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is in South Africa for Nelson Mandela's memorial, but that doesn't mean he's abandoned domestic policy. In fact, Cummings said he and other Democrats in the official delegation have used the trip to debate with Sen. Ted Cruz on Obamacare. "He got an earful from many of us -- I mean it was a very good conversation, nothing negative," the Baltimore Democrat said in an interview from Johannesburg. "I just reminded him that I'm concerned about the many people in my state and his state who have no health insurance.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Baltimore Rep. Elijah Cummings will be among 26 congressmen traveling to South Africa to attend memorial services for revered leader Nelson Mandela Tuesday in FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto. It was at that stadium in July 2010 that Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final. Mandela, who died Thursday evening at the age of 95, will be buried Dec. 15 in his hometown of Qunu, following a traditional 10 days of mourning. It was there that the first black president of the divided country spent his childhood years.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
In the Christmas season, it is natural for men and women of the Christian faith to ponder the lessons of the Gospel and particularly the forbearance of their savior who made the ultimate sacrifice so that others might be free. Few political leaders who have walked the earth inspire comparisons to Jesus Christ and the love he held for mankind. Nelson Mandela, the South African leader who died Thursday night at the age of 95, would be the exception. For many, Mr. Mandela will be remembered for ending apartheid rule, for fighting against racism and oppression, leading a revolution and for surviving 27 years as a political prisoner.
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