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July 24, 2013
1998: Martin Roesch makes a program called Snort, which "sniffs out" network hackers and viruses , available for free online. 2001: Roesch founds Sourcefire in his Carroll County living room in order to produce a commercial version of Snort. October 2005: Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., an Israeli company, announces plans to acquire Sourcefire for $225 million. March 2006: Check Point abandons the acquisition after a federal panel begins investigating the deal. Federal officials opposed the acquisition, fearing it could result in the exposure of the government's network practices.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Whenever Baltimore-area companies sell themselves to out-of-state firms, economists and local leaders alike bemoan the loss. Another headquarters gone. Fewer corporate decision-makers here. Possible job cuts. But Silicon Valley's deals for two Columbia firms - the planned Micros Systems acquisition, announced last week, and Sourcefire last year - strike local entrepreneurs in an entirely different way. They want more California tech giants doing business here, more billion-dollar-plus acquisitions.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based cybersecurity company, said Wednesday it acquired for $21 million a California company that specializes in providing digital protection to users of Internet-based computing networks. Sourcefire said it was paying $21 million cash for Immunet, a Palo Alto, Calif.-based company. The deal included $17 million paid out immediately and $4 million paid over the next 18 months if Immunet reaches unspecified milestones for its software targeted for business use, which it plans to roll out this year.
NEWS
By Mike Denison, Capital News Service | March 16, 2014
High-profile cyber attacks on organizations such as Target and Neiman Marcus have drawn increased attention to the cybersecurity industry - an industry that continues to thrive in Maryland, and specifically in Howard County. Local cybersecurity experts who aim to thwart hackers say they are always being challenged, and at times seem to work from a disadvantage. "We have to be right 100 percent of the time," said Jim Close, federal account manager for Sourcefire, a Columbia-based network security company acquired by Cisco in October.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2010
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia cybersecurity company best known for its Snort intrusion-prevention technology, said Thursday that its net income nearly tripled in the fourth quarter of last year to $6.7 million, compared with a year earlier. Revenue was $35.3 million, up 37 percent from a year earlier. The company earned $8.9 million in profits in all of 2009, the first year since it went public in March 2007 that it wasn't in the red. One driver was a nearly twofold increase in sales to the federal government.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based cybersecurity company, reported it earned $2.2 million in the second quarter, or 7 cents per share. That compares with a $1.1 million profit, or 4 cents per share, a year ago. Revenue in the April-to-June period reached $65.1 million, up from $50.6 million a year earlier. Last week, Cisco Systems announced it planned to acquire Sourcefire for $2.7 billion in cash. Sourcefire's headquarters is expected to remain in Columbia after the sale, and Cisco said it did not plan to eliminate any jobs there.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based provider of cybersecurity technology to government and commercial clients, said its CEO retired earlier this week after taking a medical leave to be treated for colon cancer. John C. Burris, 57, led Sourcefire since 2008. Company officials credited Burris, a former top executive with Citrix Systems, Lucent Technologies and AT&T, with helping it achieve profitability and expand its product offerings. Burris had been on medical leave since July. Martin Roesch, Sourcefire's founder and chief technology officer, is serving as the company's interim CEO until a successor for Burris can be found.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A marquee name in the technology industry said Tuesday that it is buying Columbia-based Sourcefire - a homegrown player in the hot cybersecurity field - for $2.7 billion cash. Cisco Systems wants to bolster its security offerings with Sourcefire products, which protect the computers and networks of major businesses and government agencies. The Silicon Valley firm - eager to tap new talent and increase its footprint in the East Coast's major cyber hub - said Sourcefire's headquarters will remain in Columbia and it does not plan any job cuts.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III and WILLIAM PATALON III,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia developer of hacker-prevention technology for computer networks, will be acquired by network security leader Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. in a deal valued at $225 million, the two firms announced yesterday. The state of Maryland and a local venture capital firm are poised to be big winners when the deal is consummated late this year or in the first quarter of 2006. The Maryland Venture Fund, which invested $550,000 through its Enterprise Investment Fund in February 2002, will receive a payout of nearly $4 million, said Elizabeth R. Good, the fund's managing director.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | June 26, 2008
Sourcefire Inc. rejected a counteroffer from a California anti-spam firm that wants to acquire the struggling Columbia security-software company. The company said yesterday that Barracuda Networks Inc.'s sweetened $8.25-a-share bid - 10 percent higher than a previous proposal - is not in the best interest of the company and shareholders. The new proposal is worth $206 million. Sourcefire shares rose 45 cents, or 5.89 percent, to close at $8.09 yesterday. Sourcefire is best known for selling software designed to work with its open-source intrusion prevention technology, Snort.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based cybersecurity company, reported it earned $2.2 million in the second quarter, or 7 cents per share. That compares with a $1.1 million profit, or 4 cents per share, a year ago. Revenue in the April-to-June period reached $65.1 million, up from $50.6 million a year earlier. Last week, Cisco Systems announced it planned to acquire Sourcefire for $2.7 billion in cash. Sourcefire's headquarters is expected to remain in Columbia after the sale, and Cisco said it did not plan to eliminate any jobs there.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
Who would have guessed 15 years ago that Martin Roesch's free computer network-security program would turn into a $2.7 billion deal? Roesch used the no-cost software he developed in 1998 - called Snort because it sniffs out trouble - as the foundation for Columbia cybersecurity firm Sourcefire Inc. On Tuesday, the company announced that it had agreed to sell itself to tech giant Cisco Systems Inc. The price speaks to the business potential in...
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013
1998: Martin Roesch makes a program called Snort, which "sniffs out" network hackers and viruses , available for free online. 2001: Roesch founds Sourcefire in his Carroll County living room in order to produce a commercial version of Snort. October 2005: Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., an Israeli company, announces plans to acquire Sourcefire for $225 million. March 2006: Check Point abandons the acquisition after a federal panel begins investigating the deal. Federal officials opposed the acquisition, fearing it could result in the exposure of the government's network practices.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A marquee name in the technology industry said Tuesday that it is buying Columbia-based Sourcefire - a homegrown player in the hot cybersecurity field - for $2.7 billion cash. Cisco Systems wants to bolster its security offerings with Sourcefire products, which protect the computers and networks of major businesses and government agencies. The Silicon Valley firm - eager to tap new talent and increase its footprint in the East Coast's major cyber hub - said Sourcefire's headquarters will remain in Columbia and it does not plan any job cuts.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Columbia cybersecurity firm Sourcefire Inc. named John Becker, a longtime member of its board of directors, as the company's new CEO on Monday. Becker comes to Sourcefire from a position as CEO of ScienceLogic, a Reston, Va., company that sells network monitoring software and services. Before that, he led a series of information security companies that were each sold. He has served on Sourcefire's board since 2008. Becker steps in after Sourcefire founder and chief technology officer Martin F. Roesch led the company on an interim basis for nearly a year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based provider of cybersecurity technology to government and commercial clients, said its CEO retired earlier this week after taking a medical leave to be treated for colon cancer. John C. Burris, 57, led Sourcefire since 2008. Company officials credited Burris, a former top executive with Citrix Systems, Lucent Technologies and AT&T, with helping it achieve profitability and expand its product offerings. Burris had been on medical leave since July. Martin Roesch, Sourcefire's founder and chief technology officer, is serving as the company's interim CEO until a successor for Burris can be found.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | May 31, 2008
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia security-software company that has struggled with losses since going public last year, said yesterday that it has rejected a $186 million acquisition proposal from a California anti-spam firm. In a terse new release, the company said its board "believes that the proposal substantially undervalues Sourcefire." Officials declined to comment beyond the release. The unsolicited $7.50-a-share offer from Barracuda Networks Inc. is 13 percent above Sourcefire's closing price on May 23, the last full day of trading before Barracuda proposed the deal.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Shares of Sourcefire Inc. fell 8 percent Wednesday as the Columbia-based provider of cybersecurity technology reported that fourth-quarter earnings fell by a third compared with the previous year. The company's net income declined to $4.4 million in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, compared with $6.7 million a year earlier. Sourcefire's quarterly revenues rose by 8 percent, to $38 million, compared with $35.3 million in the fourth quarter of 2009. For all of 2009, Sourcefire's profit was $20 million, compared with $8.9 million in 2009, while revenues climbed more than $3 million to $38 million.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based cybersecurity company, said Wednesday it acquired for $21 million a California company that specializes in providing digital protection to users of Internet-based computing networks. Sourcefire said it was paying $21 million cash for Immunet, a Palo Alto, Calif.-based company. The deal included $17 million paid out immediately and $4 million paid over the next 18 months if Immunet reaches unspecified milestones for its software targeted for business use, which it plans to roll out this year.
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