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By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,The Evening Sun York Inn The Sun Uncle Lee's The Sunday Sun | December 8, 1990
Bamboo HouseYorktowne Plaza Shopping Center, Cockeysville. 666-9550. This is a comfortable, soothing oasis set incongruously in a shopping center off York Road. It is also a successful oasis, having recently grown from one room to three. The Bamboo House is more sophisticated in its approach to food and service than many Chinese restaurants. The food is flavorful and plentiful; the Szechuan Green Beans were outstanding. $$ 1/2 moderately expensive.(Last visited 11/90).10010 York Road, Cockeysville, 666-0006.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
Be sure to give this vegetarian hot and sour soup a chance. Beth Hunter of Timonium requested it for her teen-age daughter. "She is a vegetarian and likes Chinese hot and sour soup, which is usually made with chicken and pork," she wrote.Her request was answered by A.T.M., no other name, of Baltimore who wrote, "I am enclosing an experiment that has been a success with my vegetarian daughter." Chef Gilles Syglowski liked the experiment.A.T.M.'s vegetarian soupServes 44 dried Chinese mushrooms3 1/2 plus 1/2 cups hot water3 packets G. Washington Rich Brown Broth, ("a meatless powder available in the bouillon section at Giant supermarket")
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 2, 1992
5513 Harford Road. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. (410) 426-8282 or (410) 426-8288.We knew, the minute the sign went up, it was the start of something good. "Coming soon," it said, "Chinese carryout."Sure enough, when Fast Wok opened a year or so ago, it was everything we hoped for and more. Talk about location -- it's right next door to the major video-rental store in Hamilton. You can place your order, pop over and pick out a movie, and return to pick up a steaming, fragrant and very reasonably priced meal.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | October 3, 1992
Bohager'sBohager's, 515 S. Eden St., (410) 563-7220. Bohager's has two things going for it before you ever get to the food: enough parking and a great deck out back. Inside, the restaurant is fashionably stark, but the open grill makes it too smoky for my taste. You'll love the results of that smoke, though: the succulent ribs, flavorful steaks and fat hamburgers with that good, smoky edge. Not all of our meal was as good -- thumbs down on the guacamole and a beer and Cheddar dip. And a salad with grilled tuna fillet was the worst of the lot; the tuna was ice cold and tasted fishy.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | October 3, 1992
Bohager'sBohager's, 515 S. Eden St., (410) 563-7220. Bohager's has two things going for it before you ever get to the food: enough parking and a great deck out back. Inside, the restaurant is fashionably stark, but the open grill makes it too smoky for my taste. You'll love the results of that smoke, though: the succulent ribs, flavorful steaks and fat hamburgers with that good, smoky edge. Not all of our meal was as good -- thumbs down on the guacamole and a beer and Cheddar dip. And a salad with grilled tuna fillet was the worst of the lot; the tuna was ice cold and tasted fishy.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 5, 1991
584 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville. Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Phone: 667-4200.This unpretentious Chinese restaurant and carryout is located ia narrow storefront in the busy Cranbrook Shopping Center, where, teeming with traffic at 5 o'clock on a Saturday evening, you're lucky to make it out of the parking lot without getting run over.Let's get the bad news out of the way first. The egg rolls ($1.15) are only fair. It is almost impossible to screw up egg rolls, but somehow the folks at China King succeeded.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 15, 1992
The dish that epitomizes Joey Chiu's Greenspring Inn for me is a house specialty: broiled sirloin steak, served with sauteed snow peas and fried rice, for $17.95. The large cut of prime-quality beef comes charred and rare, sliced through to save you the trouble of cutting it yourself and handsomely arranged with the snow peas and rice. It's about as Chinese as the restaurant's name itself, or the Key lime cheesecake offered for dessert. But with -- say -- bowls of hot and sour soup as a first course, it would make a fine dinner for two.My point is that in the newest of his three Baltimore-area restaurants, Mr. Chiu has outdone himself with what he does best: offering the kind of food Americans love with an Oriental accent to it -- and offering that food in swanky, comfortable, have-a-glass-of-chardonnay-with-your-egg-rolls surroundings.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
Be sure to give this vegetarian hot and sour soup a chance. Beth Hunter of Timonium requested it for her teen-age daughter. "She is a vegetarian and likes Chinese hot and sour soup, which is usually made with chicken and pork," she wrote.Her request was answered by A.T.M., no other name, of Baltimore who wrote, "I am enclosing an experiment that has been a success with my vegetarian daughter." Chef Gilles Syglowski liked the experiment.A.T.M.'s vegetarian soupServes 44 dried Chinese mushrooms3 1/2 plus 1/2 cups hot water3 packets G. Washington Rich Brown Broth, ("a meatless powder available in the bouillon section at Giant supermarket")
NEWS
By JOAN WHITSON WALLACE | October 7, 1990
Perhaps you haven't noticed, but I have -- almost every week a new restaurant opens in Anne Arundel County. One of the newest, Lee's Szechuan Restaurant, was our destination this past week.Lee's has several attributes in its favor to make it a winner in our family. For starters, the specialty cuisine is Szechuan, a favorite in the Wallace household. Another positive is, as they say in the real estate business, location, location, location.Situated in Northway Shopping Center at Route 3 and Old Mill Road, Lee's is very convenient to our Severn home.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | November 25, 1990
Uncle Lee's was born in 1979, on the site of a progressively deteriorating Eddie's grocery store. At the beginning, the building was half restaurant and half an excellent Chinese market that sold jasmine teas and gyoza wrappers, and less familiar products like almond powder, Chinese sesame paste and jars of fermented rice. (Such things were not available all over the city then.)The store didn't take, but the restaurant did. Its interesting dishes tasted of ingredients that had been freshly assembled and cooked, the peppers were hotter than any around, and tastes were surprising, often explosive, and authoritative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | September 11, 1992
By the extremely scientific method of counting the names under S in the telephone book, I came up with 12 Chinese restaurants called Szechuan something. (Of course, these didn't include restaurants called something Szechuan, as in the "Hunan-Szechuan Dragon Palace" or whatever.) My point is that owner Paul Chao was smart to change the name of his restaurant on Charles Street near 25th from Szechuan Gourmet to Paul Chao's Shangri-La. Just don't get it confused with his place in Severna Park, known simply as Shangri-La.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 2, 1992
5513 Harford Road. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. (410) 426-8282 or (410) 426-8288.We knew, the minute the sign went up, it was the start of something good. "Coming soon," it said, "Chinese carryout."Sure enough, when Fast Wok opened a year or so ago, it was everything we hoped for and more. Talk about location -- it's right next door to the major video-rental store in Hamilton. You can place your order, pop over and pick out a movie, and return to pick up a steaming, fragrant and very reasonably priced meal.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 15, 1992
The dish that epitomizes Joey Chiu's Greenspring Inn for me is a house specialty: broiled sirloin steak, served with sauteed snow peas and fried rice, for $17.95. The large cut of prime-quality beef comes charred and rare, sliced through to save you the trouble of cutting it yourself and handsomely arranged with the snow peas and rice. It's about as Chinese as the restaurant's name itself, or the Key lime cheesecake offered for dessert. But with -- say -- bowls of hot and sour soup as a first course, it would make a fine dinner for two.My point is that in the newest of his three Baltimore-area restaurants, Mr. Chiu has outdone himself with what he does best: offering the kind of food Americans love with an Oriental accent to it -- and offering that food in swanky, comfortable, have-a-glass-of-chardonnay-with-your-egg-rolls surroundings.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 5, 1991
584 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville. Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Phone: 667-4200.This unpretentious Chinese restaurant and carryout is located ia narrow storefront in the busy Cranbrook Shopping Center, where, teeming with traffic at 5 o'clock on a Saturday evening, you're lucky to make it out of the parking lot without getting run over.Let's get the bad news out of the way first. The egg rolls ($1.15) are only fair. It is almost impossible to screw up egg rolls, but somehow the folks at China King succeeded.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | August 4, 1991
Ding How is Fells Point's only new Chinese restaurant (if a place open about a year comes under the heading of "new"). Ding How is also Fells Point's only Chinese restaurant (unless I've overlooked some secret won ton stash). It is not small, or large, or hectic, but attractive, peaceable and comforting, and serves plausible and familiar Chinese food.Most restaurants I visit once. When they're not at a distance, and when they lend themselves to ordering every which way, however, I sometimes like to go a couple of times.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | July 7, 1991
John Liu takes his Sichuan crispy beef very seriously. "I personally eat it at many places," he says. "They cook it American-style but it doesn't come out right."Sometimes," he continues, "you can overcook and it has a burned flavor. If I serve it that way, you're going to come back and tell me, 'Hey John, I want my money back. I don't want to eat charcoal.' This crispy beef Sichuan, you have to have a very good chef, very skilled."Mr. Liu thinks he has found such a "very good chef, very skilled" -- just the right person for the delicate crispy beef -- in Cheng Yu Huang, his partner in their new restaurant, First Wok, located in Glenmont Towers off Loch Raven Boulevard in Towson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | September 11, 1992
By the extremely scientific method of counting the names under S in the telephone book, I came up with 12 Chinese restaurants called Szechuan something. (Of course, these didn't include restaurants called something Szechuan, as in the "Hunan-Szechuan Dragon Palace" or whatever.) My point is that owner Paul Chao was smart to change the name of his restaurant on Charles Street near 25th from Szechuan Gourmet to Paul Chao's Shangri-La. Just don't get it confused with his place in Severna Park, known simply as Shangri-La.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | August 4, 1991
Ding How is Fells Point's only new Chinese restaurant (if a place open about a year comes under the heading of "new"). Ding How is also Fells Point's only Chinese restaurant (unless I've overlooked some secret won ton stash). It is not small, or large, or hectic, but attractive, peaceable and comforting, and serves plausible and familiar Chinese food.Most restaurants I visit once. When they're not at a distance, and when they lend themselves to ordering every which way, however, I sometimes like to go a couple of times.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,The Evening Sun York Inn The Sun Uncle Lee's The Sunday Sun | December 8, 1990
Bamboo HouseYorktowne Plaza Shopping Center, Cockeysville. 666-9550. This is a comfortable, soothing oasis set incongruously in a shopping center off York Road. It is also a successful oasis, having recently grown from one room to three. The Bamboo House is more sophisticated in its approach to food and service than many Chinese restaurants. The food is flavorful and plentiful; the Szechuan Green Beans were outstanding. $$ 1/2 moderately expensive.(Last visited 11/90).10010 York Road, Cockeysville, 666-0006.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | November 25, 1990
Uncle Lee's was born in 1979, on the site of a progressively deteriorating Eddie's grocery store. At the beginning, the building was half restaurant and half an excellent Chinese market that sold jasmine teas and gyoza wrappers, and less familiar products like almond powder, Chinese sesame paste and jars of fermented rice. (Such things were not available all over the city then.)The store didn't take, but the restaurant did. Its interesting dishes tasted of ingredients that had been freshly assembled and cooked, the peppers were hotter than any around, and tastes were surprising, often explosive, and authoritative.
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