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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 4, 1993
MENACE II SOCIETYOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Jive 41509)What would an urban violence flick be without a rap soundtrack? But if the packaging for "Menace II Society" looks like standard Hollywood rap-sploitation, the sound of the album is something else again. Because as much as the raps collected here might talk guns and violence, the music hits home with a palpable sense of place, and that lends added impact to tracks like "Pocket Full of Stones" by U.G.K., Ant Banks' searingly soulful "Packin' a Gun" or Too $hort's brooding and brutal "Only the Strong Survive."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1998
You've Got MailMusic from the Motion Picture (Atlantic 83153)While we're in the theater, the music in a movie soundtrack has a very specific job: to underscore the action on screen and create an atmosphere that would give the images maximum impact. In other words, the music is meant to manipulate our mood and make us feel the way the director wants us to feel.Outside the multiplex, movie music has a different, but not dissimilar, role. When we hear a soundtrack album, we should get a sense of the movie's mood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 15, 1996
The Crow: City of AngelsOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Hollywood 20472)Given the kind of response the Brandon Lee film "The Crow" generated, a sequel seemed inevitable -- if only to provide the excuse for another soundtrack album. But unlike its predecessor, which expanded the death-obsessed aura of goth culture to the full spectrum of alternarock, the soundtrack album for "The Crow: City of Angels" is much more hodgepodge in its approach. That's not to say it's any less listenable -- frankly, the first few tracks have more hooks than the whole of the first "Crow" soundtrack -- but it is markedly less consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine An American Werewolf in Paris | December 25, 1997
Jackie BrownMusic from the Miramax Motion Picture (Maverick 46841)Curtis MayfieldSuperfly (Rhino 72836)One of the best things about the "blaxploitation" flicks of the '70s was their soundtracks. Films like "Shaft," "Superfly" and "Slaughter's Big Rip-Off" may not have been masterpieces of the cinema, but the music that went with those movies often verged on the classic.That Quentin Tarantino would try to evoke that vibe for his latest film shouldn't be too great a surprise. After all, "Pulp Fiction" and "Reservoir Dogs" got major mileage out of their use of oldies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1998
You've Got MailMusic from the Motion Picture (Atlantic 83153)While we're in the theater, the music in a movie soundtrack has a very specific job: to underscore the action on screen and create an atmosphere that would give the images maximum impact. In other words, the music is meant to manipulate our mood and make us feel the way the director wants us to feel.Outside the multiplex, movie music has a different, but not dissimilar, role. When we hear a soundtrack album, we should get a sense of the movie's mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | September 18, 1997
Soul FoodMusic from the 'Soul Food' Motion Picture Soundtrack Album (LaFace)Considering the kind of success Babyface had with the "Waiting to Exhale" soundtrack, it would be hard to approach his latest attempt at movie music with anything but the highest of expectations. Don't be surprised, then, if "Music from the 'Soul Food' Motion Picture Soundtrack Album" ends up seeming somewhat less astonishing than hoped. Part of that has to do with the nature of the project. Unlike "Waiting to Exhale," where the new songs were all by Babyface and personally tailored to fit the action of the film, "Soul Food" has no overriding sense of conceptual or compositional unity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 3, 1992
THE ADDAMS FAMILYOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Capitol 98172)Whenever a box-office smash spins off a top-selling theme song, it's only natural that interested fans would look for it on the soundtrack album. But if you're hoping to snag a copy of Hammer's new hit, "Addams Groove," don't bother heading to the record store for "The Addams Family," because it's not on there. (Nor is it on Hammer's "Too Legit to Quit," unless you buy your copy on cassette). Instead, what you get is a smidgen of Vic Mizzy's original TV theme, a version of "Mamushka" sung by Raul Julia and Christopher Lloyd, and a whole lot of semi-dramatic orchestral music by Marc Shaiman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | May 29, 1997
John FogertyBlue Moon Swamp (Warner Bros. 45426)John Fogerty (pictured) is the kind of guy who would release no album before its time, and as such spent almost three years working on "Blue Moon Swamp," his first new album in over a decade. Yet there's nothing fussy or labored about these performances; in fact, when Fogerty and company find their groove, the sound is so effortless and offhand you'd almost think they were just jamming. Some of that can be chalked up to the inspired simplicity of his writing, as the album's best songs -- particularly "Rambunctious Boy" and "Bring It Down to Jelly Roll" -- are as rootsy and direct as those he wrote for Creedence Clearwater Revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine An American Werewolf in Paris | December 25, 1997
Jackie BrownMusic from the Miramax Motion Picture (Maverick 46841)Curtis MayfieldSuperfly (Rhino 72836)One of the best things about the "blaxploitation" flicks of the '70s was their soundtracks. Films like "Shaft," "Superfly" and "Slaughter's Big Rip-Off" may not have been masterpieces of the cinema, but the music that went with those movies often verged on the classic.That Quentin Tarantino would try to evoke that vibe for his latest film shouldn't be too great a surprise. After all, "Pulp Fiction" and "Reservoir Dogs" got major mileage out of their use of oldies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 1995
HIGHER LEARNINGMusic from the Motion Picture (550 Music/Epic Soundtrax 66944)What do Ice Cube, Tori Amos, Rage Against the Machine, Me'Shell NdegeOcello and the Brand New Heavies have in common? Musically, not much, and that's the problem with the soundtrack album from "Higher Learning." Like the students found in the film itself, the artists included on the soundtrack represent a wide range of excellence, from the guitar-driven alterna-rock of Liz Phair to the rumbling, bass-heavy hip-hop of OutKast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | September 18, 1997
Soul FoodMusic from the 'Soul Food' Motion Picture Soundtrack Album (LaFace)Considering the kind of success Babyface had with the "Waiting to Exhale" soundtrack, it would be hard to approach his latest attempt at movie music with anything but the highest of expectations. Don't be surprised, then, if "Music from the 'Soul Food' Motion Picture Soundtrack Album" ends up seeming somewhat less astonishing than hoped. Part of that has to do with the nature of the project. Unlike "Waiting to Exhale," where the new songs were all by Babyface and personally tailored to fit the action of the film, "Soul Food" has no overriding sense of conceptual or compositional unity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | May 29, 1997
John FogertyBlue Moon Swamp (Warner Bros. 45426)John Fogerty (pictured) is the kind of guy who would release no album before its time, and as such spent almost three years working on "Blue Moon Swamp," his first new album in over a decade. Yet there's nothing fussy or labored about these performances; in fact, when Fogerty and company find their groove, the sound is so effortless and offhand you'd almost think they were just jamming. Some of that can be chalked up to the inspired simplicity of his writing, as the album's best songs -- particularly "Rambunctious Boy" and "Bring It Down to Jelly Roll" -- are as rootsy and direct as those he wrote for Creedence Clearwater Revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 15, 1996
The Crow: City of AngelsOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Hollywood 20472)Given the kind of response the Brandon Lee film "The Crow" generated, a sequel seemed inevitable -- if only to provide the excuse for another soundtrack album. But unlike its predecessor, which expanded the death-obsessed aura of goth culture to the full spectrum of alternarock, the soundtrack album for "The Crow: City of Angels" is much more hodgepodge in its approach. That's not to say it's any less listenable -- frankly, the first few tracks have more hooks than the whole of the first "Crow" soundtrack -- but it is markedly less consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 1995
HIGHER LEARNINGMusic from the Motion Picture (550 Music/Epic Soundtrax 66944)What do Ice Cube, Tori Amos, Rage Against the Machine, Me'Shell NdegeOcello and the Brand New Heavies have in common? Musically, not much, and that's the problem with the soundtrack album from "Higher Learning." Like the students found in the film itself, the artists included on the soundtrack represent a wide range of excellence, from the guitar-driven alterna-rock of Liz Phair to the rumbling, bass-heavy hip-hop of OutKast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 4, 1993
MENACE II SOCIETYOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Jive 41509)What would an urban violence flick be without a rap soundtrack? But if the packaging for "Menace II Society" looks like standard Hollywood rap-sploitation, the sound of the album is something else again. Because as much as the raps collected here might talk guns and violence, the music hits home with a palpable sense of place, and that lends added impact to tracks like "Pocket Full of Stones" by U.G.K., Ant Banks' searingly soulful "Packin' a Gun" or Too $hort's brooding and brutal "Only the Strong Survive."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 3, 1992
THE ADDAMS FAMILYOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Capitol 98172)Whenever a box-office smash spins off a top-selling theme song, it's only natural that interested fans would look for it on the soundtrack album. But if you're hoping to snag a copy of Hammer's new hit, "Addams Groove," don't bother heading to the record store for "The Addams Family," because it's not on there. (Nor is it on Hammer's "Too Legit to Quit," unless you buy your copy on cassette). Instead, what you get is a smidgen of Vic Mizzy's original TV theme, a version of "Mamushka" sung by Raul Julia and Christopher Lloyd, and a whole lot of semi-dramatic orchestral music by Marc Shaiman.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 16, 1992
In the weeks since the Feb. 25 Grammys telecast, all sorts of acts have posted considerable sales gains.Natalie Cole, whose "Unforgettable" album earned seven Grammys, has done exceptionally well.Though "Unforgettable" had sold more than 4 million copies before the Grammy telecast, it was slipping on the pop charts. But in the March 7 issue of Billboard, the album jumped from an unbulleted No. 16 on Billboard's 200 Top Albums chart to No. 2 with a bullet following the show.The Commitments, the Irish soul band featured in a 1991 film of the same name, performed a short interpretation of Wilson Pickett's "Mustang Sally" at the Grammys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | February 19, 2014
10. 'Navy Blue,' Diane Renay I'm suggesting this as the Naval Academy's new fight song. 9. 'What Kind of Fool (Do You Think I Am),' the Tams Is there a more rational way to end a relationship than to say, "You build me up then you let me down"? 8. 'California Sun,' the Rivieras This one is popular, of course. It has been covered by, among others, the Ramones, Los Straitjackets and, yes, Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys (well, on the "Curious George 2" movie soundtrack album, but it still counts)
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