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NEWS
November 25, 1993
Over the past two decades or so, National Public Radio and its daily signature productions -- "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition" -- have done much to alter America's listening habits. Instead of mere headlines and sound bites, millions of Americans have been able to get intelligent and penetrating analyses of their own country and the world on radio.Six years ago, a new weekly public radio documentary series hit the airwaves. Called "Soundprint," it is produced by WJHU-FM (88.1)
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NEWS
October 24, 2011
Why do I feel that opera talk show host Lisa Simeone is the sacrificial lamb after being fired for supporting Occupy Wall Street in her private life? ("Lisa Simeone confirms her firing from public radio's 'Soundprint' show," Oct. 21). Putting aside the question of whether anyone not in the top 1 percent has any integrity by not supporting Occupy Wall Street in some form, how is it that the Corporation for Public Broadcasting can tolerate a political hack like Kenneth Tomlinson who was running the CPB for many years but National Public Radio had to fire Ms. Simeone?
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The radio documentary series "Soundprint," founded at WJHU-FM (88.1) in Baltimore six years ago, is about to evolve into an independent production company to be known as Soundprint Media Center, Inc.Although listeners are not likely to discern any immediate on-the-air changes, the development means the program will move this spring from WJHU headquarters on North Charles Street to new studio facilities being built at WAMU-FM (88.5) in Washington."We are becoming our own non-profit entity, an evolution of 'Soundprint' that everyone has been looking forward to," says Moira Rankin, executive producer of the series and president of the new corporation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Five posts ago, I promised I would report the NPR-Lisa-Simeone-Occupy-DC controversy down the middle until it played out. With the news that NPR will no longer distribute "World of Opera" because of Simeone's political activism, both shoes have dropped. (She had already been fired Wednesday from the public-radio documentary series "Soundprint" because her activities with the protest group October 2011 violated NPR's Ethics Code, according to the show's producer.) So here's my take on the matter: I admire Simeone for her commitment and her willingness to put her salary and career on the line for what she believes.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 19, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* A two-part radio documentary about breast cancer, concluding on tonight's edition of "Soundprint" (at 6:30, WJHU-FM 88.1), is also being made available by mail on cassettes. "Soundprint" is produced at WJHU and airs nationally on stations of the American Public Radio network.The programs include: "Breast Cancer: A Primer," which aired last week, and "Reaching for Power Through the Pain," which can be heard tonight.The first show explores the newest medical research and treatment options, while the second includes profiles of women who have dealt with the disease, including poet Audre Lorde, who wrote "The Cancer Journals," the first book about breast cancer by a black woman.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
Radio can help span cultural differences, suggests a new project launched by the Baltimore-based documentary program "Soundprint."Broadcasters from five English-speaking nations -- the United States, Britain, Ireland, Australia and Canada -- met in Washington recently to lay the groundwork for "Crossing Boundaries," a series of documentaries scheduled to air in each country beginning this fall.Each participant will produce three programs, according to Moira Rankin, executive producer of "Soundprint," which recently affiliated with National Public Radio.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
The radio documentary series "Soundprint," produced in Baltimore at WJHU-FM 88.1, has been picked up by National Public Radio. The affiliation sharply increases the number of stations able to carry the program and helps the 5-year-old series overcome a funding crisis.NPR currently has 464 stations in the United States, carrying the NPR news and public affairs fixtures "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered.""Soundprint," heard here at 7 p.m. Wednesdays and 7:30 a.m. Sundays on WJHU, previously gained national distribution through the American Public Radio network, with less than half the number of NPR stations.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 12, 1990
There is something sad in hearing an old man say, when asked to describe the creation legends of his people, "We used to think we came from the stars . . . [but] I'm not sure now," because of exposure to the stories of Allah and Jesus.Such is the ambiguous nature of change as it comes to the mountainous island of Irian Jaya, north of Australia, whose native people have only recently been "discovered" by Western culture. For the next two weeks, one of the world's least known cultures is the subject of "Soundprint," the radio documentary program produced locally at WJHU-FM 88.1 (at 6 p.m. Saturday, repeating at 6 p.m. the following Friday)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 13, 1991
It may be hard to generate sympathy for anyone whose political message is of division and intolerance. But sadness may be appropriate for presidential candidate David Duke, as he emerges from a thoughtful two-part radio profile on the Baltimore-produced program "Soundprint" this weekend.In "David Duke's New Profile," at 6 tonight on WJHU-FM 88.1 (and distributed to American Public Radio stations around the nation), we get a glimpse of a lonely child whose friends were books and who joined the Ku Klux Klan to find a family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Public radio host Lisa Simeone Thursday confirmed a report published here and elsewhere that she was fired Wednesday by the public radio series "Soundprint. " The firing came as a result of what "Soundprint' executives saw an an ethical violation by Simeone for her work as a spokeswoman with October 2011, one of the groups involved in the Occupy D.C. movement. But Simeone also found support Thursday from another employer, North Carolina classical station WDAV, producer of the "World of Opera" show for which the Baltimore broadcaster serves as a freelance host.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Public radio host Lisa Simeone Thursday confirmed a report published here and elsewhere that she was fired Wednesday by the public radio series "Soundprint. " The firing came as a result of what "Soundprint' executives saw an an ethical violation by Simeone for her work as a spokeswoman with October 2011, one of the groups involved in the Occupy D.C. movement. But Simeone also found support Thursday from another employer, North Carolina classical station WDAV, producer of the "World of Opera" show for which the Baltimore broadcaster serves as a freelance host.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Baltimore broadcaster Lisa Simeone fired back Wednesday night after a National Public Radio spokeswoman told the Baltimore Sun that NPR was looking into her role as a spokesman for a group involved in the Occupy D.C. movement. The public radio veteran expressed puzzlement as to why NPR "objects" to her exercising her "rights as a citizen," and she questioned why such big-name NPR correspondents and hosts as Mara Liaason, Scott Simon and Cokie Roberts are allowed to operate under what appears to be a different standard than the one being applied to her. At issue is whether NPR feels her activities on behalf of the overtly partisan group are acceptable in light of her role as host of NPR's "World of Opera.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The radio documentary series "Soundprint," founded at WJHU-FM (88.1) in Baltimore six years ago, is about to evolve into an independent production company to be known as Soundprint Media Center, Inc.Although listeners are not likely to discern any immediate on-the-air changes, the development means the program will move this spring from WJHU headquarters on North Charles Street to new studio facilities being built at WAMU-FM (88.5) in Washington."We are becoming our own non-profit entity, an evolution of 'Soundprint' that everyone has been looking forward to," says Moira Rankin, executive producer of the series and president of the new corporation.
NEWS
November 25, 1993
Over the past two decades or so, National Public Radio and its daily signature productions -- "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition" -- have done much to alter America's listening habits. Instead of mere headlines and sound bites, millions of Americans have been able to get intelligent and penetrating analyses of their own country and the world on radio.Six years ago, a new weekly public radio documentary series hit the airwaves. Called "Soundprint," it is produced by WJHU-FM (88.1)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Radio producers from around the world arrive in Baltimore today for a conference aimed at fostering cooperative programs to help cultures better understand each other.Interconnect 1993, organized and sponsored by "Soundprint," the documentary series produced here at WJHU-FM (88.1), begins tonight with an opening address by Bill Siemering, the first program director of National Public Radio and founder of "All Things Considered," as well as of "Soundprint."Workshops and panel discussions continue through Monday at the Latham Hotel.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
Radio can help span cultural differences, suggests a new project launched by the Baltimore-based documentary program "Soundprint."Broadcasters from five English-speaking nations -- the United States, Britain, Ireland, Australia and Canada -- met in Washington recently to lay the groundwork for "Crossing Boundaries," a series of documentaries scheduled to air in each country beginning this fall.Each participant will produce three programs, according to Moira Rankin, executive producer of "Soundprint," which recently affiliated with National Public Radio.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Radio producers from around the world arrive in Baltimore today for a conference aimed at fostering cooperative programs to help cultures better understand each other.Interconnect 1993, organized and sponsored by "Soundprint," the documentary series produced here at WJHU-FM (88.1), begins tonight with an opening address by Bill Siemering, the first program director of National Public Radio and founder of "All Things Considered," as well as of "Soundprint."Workshops and panel discussions continue through Monday at the Latham Hotel.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 22, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Would-be kingmaker Larry King, whose talk show ushered billionaire Ross Perot onto and then abruptly off the presidential platform, tonight steps away from politics for his third show biz celebrity special."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
The radio documentary series "Soundprint," produced in Baltimore at WJHU-FM 88.1, has been picked up by National Public Radio. The affiliation sharply increases the number of stations able to carry the program and helps the 5-year-old series overcome a funding crisis.NPR currently has 464 stations in the United States, carrying the NPR news and public affairs fixtures "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered.""Soundprint," heard here at 7 p.m. Wednesdays and 7:30 a.m. Sundays on WJHU, previously gained national distribution through the American Public Radio network, with less than half the number of NPR stations.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 22, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Would-be kingmaker Larry King, whose talk show ushered billionaire Ross Perot onto and then abruptly off the presidential platform, tonight steps away from politics for his third show biz celebrity special."
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